4

Is there perhaps a technique I can use to lower the pitch of the E to Eb while blowing a C triad? No there isn't. For minor key chord stuff people tend to play chromatic harmonicas in D minor or Eb minor (and in that sense they become partially diatonic instruments). I saw a video the other day that I now can't find, of Jason Ricci playing a chromatic live ...


3

So it's blow/draw for C/D E/F G/A, and draw/blow for B/C. This seems to fit with the standard tuning for a chromatic, "solo" tuning, which is the following repeated pattern: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10… etc. ------------------------------------ blow: |C |E |G |C |C |E |G |C |C |E...etc. draw: |D |F |A |B |D |F |A |B |D |F...etc ------...


2

I went a bit down the rabbit hole with this one, I had some idea but in the end I ended up reading quite a lot about early chromatic harmonicas and diatonic harmonicas, so see if my ideas were in fact justified. I hope you'll excuse the long answer, but in my opinion it's all relevant to why the instrument is the way it is today, and imho it's pretty ...


2

Pretty sure you can't. Blow gives C major orC# major. Draw gives G9 as the full chord - orG#9. The button obviously raises D to D#/Eb but that comes on a draw while C and G are blown. So not only is it a draw-back but also a bit of a blow,so to speak... It may be possible to blow a C chord triad and partially block the middle E hole but can't explain ...


1

I'm not actually really a chromatic player, I'm much more a diatonic player. Having said that, here's the answer: there is no hard and fast rule, it's simply whichever one is more convenient for a given passage. Practically, for the 2 blow notes, it makes very little difference. Obviously, if you're about to play an A or a G then it's easier to play the ...


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