37

According to the notes given at the beginning of my score: In large orchestras, from rehearsal [94] on, wherever the letter D appears in the 2 Flutes, Oboes, E♭ and C Clarinet parts, these parts are to be doubled. (EDITOR'S NOTE: The doubling ceases where the letter E appears in these same parts.) I've personally never seen this particular notation ...


14

Saxophones and oboes are conical, and behave like closed conical pipes. They are closed at the reed, just like the clarinet. Flutes are cylindrical, and behave like open cylindrical pipes. The sound is made by blowing across the opening at the head joint, and it is not closed like in other woodwinds. Clarinets are cylindrical like the flute, but closed ...


14

My response will be in part influenced by the information I gathered from reading your profile. My first suggestion to you is to strongly encourage you to learn an instrument. If you're serious about writing music and about having it played by live performers, having a working knowledge of the instruments is important. It is paramount to be technically ...


10

With a fast enough tempo, it could be quite a few! :-) Necessarily, you would need to time it out at your score's tempo to find a number, but the clarinet in general has a lot of resistance compared to other wind instruments, so the amount of airflow is relatively small. Depending on the range of the instrument in which this note occurs, a good clarinetist ...


10

In this admittedly limited study, they record one oboist using more than double (over 110 cm H2O) the blowing pressure to play fortissimo compared to two different clarinetists (both around 50 cm H2O), also playing fortissimo. The other oboist in the study blew a peak pressure of about 80 cm H2O for fortissimo playing. A better graphical comparison is ...


9

I play all 3 instruments. Saxophone is simply an easier instrument than clarinet overall, and is more commonly used in rock music. It's the natural choice. That being said, oboists often find clarinet easier because the embouchure is a bit firmer, which they're used to. Sax embouchure can feel awkwardly loose, especially on tenor and lower saxes. I know ...


9

The point of transposing instruments is to be able to play different sizes of the same instrument (such as an A and a B clarinet) without learning a new set of fingerings. An A clarinet is slightly longer than a B clarinet, therefore whenever you use the same fingering to play a tone as on the B (or C) clarinet, the result sounds a second (or a third) ...


9

The bass clarinet is a transposing instrument: the Bb bass clarinet sounds a full major 9th below what is written for its sheet music. For example, that written G in the OP sounds like the F in the octave below. The bass clarinet is nowhere close to being the only transposing instrument, though: for example, the regular Bb clarinet sounds a major 2nd below ...


8

Disclaimer: former clarinet and sax player, never double reed. As Edouard points out, the sax goes in octaves just as an oboe does. However, it doesn't take long to get the "feel" of the octave+fifth that the clarinet uses. The clarinet requires a somewhat tighter embouchure than the sax, so you may find it less of a jump from the extremely tight oboe ...


7

I am assuming for this answer that you are wanting to adjust commercial reeds made from cane (not synthetic materials), and that you are not trying to make your own reeds from blanks or from stalks of cane. I have always felt that my time with the saxophone was too limited as it was. So, I always wanted to keep the reed work as simple and quick as possible ...


7

It really depends on where it was taken, who it was taken to, and how much needed to be done to it. If it was taken to a small, local person with little demand and all it needed was new corks / pads, it wouldn't be too much. If it was local or taken out of state to someone in high-demand / highly regarded and needed a lot of work, it could also have cost a ...


7

As tuning up is difficult for any wind-instrument it is better when it comes with a slightly higher 'base' tuning already. If you pull the mouthpiece out you can tune the clarinet down but you couldn't tune it up when your mouthpiece is already fully stuck on the instrument. You had to do all tuning corrections with your mouth - which might be difficult ...


7

Both are extremely common in orchestral music, and any professional musician (or even a serious college student or hobbyist) who plays classical music should have them. And even if they don't, they should be adept at transposing. I wouldn't classify the higher pitched trumpets as "harsher", but rather "brighter". The C trumpet is noticeably brighter than ...


6

There are generally a few levels of "reconditioning" that could have been done, depending on the quality of the clarinet and how badly it had been neglected. Re-Pad - All padded keys have their pads replaced. Typically also includes cleaning and lubrication of key hinges. Some shops will also replace felt and cork key silencers and any corked key pads at ...


6

What makes this complicated is that different brands of mouthpiece makers use different labeling methods for these characteristics. Generally speaking though, you can make the following deductions: Tip Opening: This is the distance from the tip of the reed to the tip of the mouthpiece (when a reed is in place). The wider the tip opening (or higher the ...


6

The basic answer (which applies to carbon fiber stringed instruments too) is that our current understanding of materials science is insufficient to produce a material which exhibits as "flat", i.e. uniform frequency resonance curve as wood. Keep in mind that it takes a lot of skill to select proper wood -- there's a reason reed instruments are made ...


6

I want to get better, yet not play for more than 45 minutes because I can't fit that into my schedule. What would be the best about of time to practice clarinet between 15 and 50 minutes? 45 minutes per day is plenty for a non-professional player. There are a few points you would want to take into account when planning your session. How to spend the ...


6

This is what the top two side keys are for. From a throat A, adding the top side key results in a B.


5

Much like the strengths of different brands wooden reeds, plastics reeds also vary - a number 3 is not always a number 3! You'll need to find an appropriate comparison chart (like below) for whichever brand of reed you choose to buy. (I'm not sure what's available in Canada, apologies.) I have two Fibracell reeds, and haven't been especially impressed by ...


5

I can generally hold a note for 16 counts at quarter note = 60. It leaves me huffing though. I've known other players who can do more and most young players can do far less.


5

Have you considered a brass instrument like trombone or euphonium? For me, the embouchures share some important characteristics, while still being distinct enough that one shouldn't mess up the other. If you are an advanced player and plan on pursuing music as a career, I would highly recommend continuing to practice bassoon throughout marching season, ...


5

The clarinet has a cylindrical bore, which makes it behave as a closed tube, odd harmonics. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bore_(wind_instruments)


5

Disclaimer: I’m a fellow sax player and have more or less never blown into a clarinet. As you probably know a clarinet does not have an octave key (it has a key which makes the clarinet jump to the fifth of the octave/twelfth instead). Because of that, you shouldn’t expect fingerings between saxophone and clarinet to be related at all. Other than that, I’m ...


5

Yes, reeds do need breaking in. It's only after breaking a reed in that you can decide if it is up to the job or not. Normally you end up with a number of broken in reeds so you can choose which one is best to use.


4

Reed strength is more of a personal preference in terms of sound, but according to the Vandoren website, they recommend anywhere from a 3 1/2 to a 5 in reed strength for that mouthpiece.


4

My sister in law was playing sax, but needed to switch to clarinet to be accepted in our wind orchestra, since the sax was well covered but we needed clarinets. She used about six months before she felt good enough to start in the orchestra (her instructor felt she was ready sooner).


4

If you hear an air-rushing sound, it's almost certainly due to reed strength, as you are finding out. Leaks in pads or body joints are more likely to produce squeaky notes, or make it difficult/impossible to play notes which expect the given pad to be closed. But far more important: please take some lessons from a qualified instructor. It's all too ...


4

The snorting means that you probably have a weak soft pallet towards your nasal passage. It is totally normal. I know because I have it too. Once you start snorting, it could be embarrassing. I don't know how much you practice, but for me, after practicing several hours a day, I get tired. So I take mini 30 min breaks in between. On the day of the concert, ...


4

I hate to be negative, but there isn't a sax in a Dixieland band. In ensemble choruses trumpet takes the tune, clarinet arpeggios over the top, trombone fills in the middle with plenty of trademark glissandi. And if you want the Dixieland style, that's it. I've just spent some time on YouTube hoping to prove myself wrong. I couldn't find a Dixie band with ...


4

One of the beginner issues with clarinet is covering the 7 main tone holes cleanly. If your finger isn't covering it fully, the gap will act like a leaky pad. I think this is the most likely source of your problem. It could also just be a leaky pad somewhere. The side keys (especially the top two) and the G#/A keys are very common culprits. The tech ...


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