Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
16

As luthier Chris Larkin explains for this 9 string bass monster - To get suitable tension on the huge variation of string sizes it required different scale lengths for each string and so needed fan frets. I managed to find a 7-string fanned fret guitar I really liked (The Ormsby HypeGTR), so I thought I'd buy it and experiment to see exactly what the ...


14

Just to be clear, what you have are ball-end nylon strings, right? Because if you're planning on putting steel strings on a classical guitar, I'll have to advise you against moving forward. The instrument is not built for steel string tension. If they are nylon strings, on a standard classical guitar, Frets.com has a tutorial on the right way to restring ...


14

I do see why you prefer the imiimi fingering, you are following a pattern where your fingers are used to three notes on each string, and that feels good. There are some rare but serious classical guitarists that use a three finger technique (imaima) that get a similar feeling without the problems that I discuss below and @Matt also stated. It can be an even ...


14

Some parts of the shopping are the same as with all acoustic guitars. Look for wood quality (Considering your price range...) Solid top beats laminate. You'll notice the biggest improvement in sound here. Solid wood back and sides beats Solid top only. Guitars with purfling and binding are more expensive, and should sound better than guitars that are ...


12

When you hold a guitar the fretboard looks like that: The thickest string at the bottom and the thinnest at the top. Some people prefer to represent chord diagrams in this way, other people prefer to represent chords as they can see the fretboard in a mirror on the wall. It is only a personal preference.


12

I think you've got a good list already, but I'd quibble with the in order part. I'd recommend splitting up your practice time to work on each of these fronts every day. So for a 1-hour practice, you might do Practice yesterday's scale a few times, pick a new scale and practice it. ~ 10 min. Put on your new favorite pop song and try to transcribe the chord ...


12

There is nothing wrong with using a capo, if it makes the sound you want. Having said that, the barred shapes you are using are pretty simple ones, and it will be worthwhile learning to play them without a capo. In your example you are raising the pitch of the whole song by 5 semitones. So: The Am becomes a Dm The E becomes an A The A7 becomes a D7 The ...


12

I think the B means Barre, and the roman numeral is the position. So B VII would be barre on the 7th fret. I don't know what the 6 means. If you look at bar 37, we see: BVIII6, and this is a chord of C, and in bar 63 we see BII5 for a chord on B and in bar 67 BIII6 for a chord on G. All these other chords confirm my assumption that the B means Barre and ...


11

This is a positive thing. Studies have shown the positive effect music has on unborn babies, see: Whitwell, Giselle E. "The importance of prenatal sound and music." Journal of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Health 13 (1999): 255-262. http://intraspec.ca/music.pdf


11

Yes, Black (and sometimes Red) nylon strings have more of a treble/high end sound and are more distinctive in tone than the classic nylon. Sources: Wisegeek article on classical strings JustStrings overview of classical strings


11

I think that a well-rounded guitarist should use both. Regarding negative effects, my answer is no, provided that you continue to occasionally go back and practice the other style. For example, if you've been using a pick for a long time, and then decide to play fingerstyle for an extended period of time, don't hesitate to go back to using a pick every ...


10

My guess is that the direction the finger is moving is not perpendicular to the fretboard. And so you are in effect plucking the string with the small bit of flesh caused by the indentation of the string itself. When you fret the string, the string frets you, so to speak. The string creates an indentation in the surface of the fingertip which will recover ...


10

Classical guitar truss rods are not designed for steel strings - I learnt this as a child when my classical (with a truss rod) ended up with a bent rod and cracked neck.


10

It's an octave clef. It's telling you all the notes written are actually down an octave. Since the guitar is already a transposing instrument where everything is transposed down an octave, it's essentially showing you the actual notes being played instead of the implied octave transposition. So for simplicity's sake you can just ignore it and play as you ...


9

Valentin is right, keeping your nails a bit shorter is probably one of the most useful things to do. But, let me add a few things. I am primarily a guitarist, and I play the piano, but wouldn't consider myself a pianist; so, much of my advice is from a guitarist's perspective. Even though most of the classical guitarists I know (including me!) use nails, ...


9

The top of an acoustic guitar (steel-string or classical) is also referred to as the table. This is the flat piece of wood making up the front of the guitar's body when in playing position (which is a bit confusing!) It is the flat piece of wood which has the sound-hole in it, and which has the bridge stuck to it. This part of the guitar is also called the ...


9

In English, it's called closed score. Open score means one instrument or voice per staff, as with most SATB choral music. Open score is easier to analyze, but often harder to sight-read because the shape of the fingering hand (guitar) or each hand (piano) isn't immediately visible on the page. Open score also occupies more space on the page, so it ...


8

The stretch from 8 to 12, while barring all strings is indeed tricky. Depending on the song and the emphasis on certain notes in this chord, I would not play the complete chord. I would focus on playing the notes which are most emphasized. I'd try: %8/T.X/X.8/1.9/2.8/1.12/4[C7] $8.X.10.9.8.12 This will strain your fingers less, and keep the high E note ...


8

On a purely practical level, I would suggest having another guitar player play the guitar - preferably someone with some experience playing nylon string guitar, but any acoustic guitar player will do. If you have a friend who plays guitar fairly well that's perfect - have your friend check the guitar out for you. Failing that, you could take a guitar ...


8

Pick the one that you will have most use for. To use the classical guitar as a stepping stone to electric guitar, which many do, is an overrated approach in my mind. (I did this myself, since that's how it was done in school). Playing techno on a nylon acoustic sounds like a stretch, so that would imply an electric guitar. I assume it's monetary reasons ...


8

The 'BII' is instructing you to bar your finger across the second fret like you would with a barre chord. The 'B' stands for bar and the 'II' represents the second fret. You can even see in the sections where the 'BII' occurs the lowest notes on your fret board are on the 2nd fret. This is just a another instruction similar to that of a fingering that isn'...


8

It looks as though the cracking is in the lacquer only. If that's the case, then it will probably be o.k. However, if the wood itself is cracked, the sound may well be compromised, and will reflect in the fact that the guitar could only be worth 1/3 of its value, as it will need expert repair. The best way to tell is to tap the soundboard to hear if the ...


8

If you can learn to play without fret markers, you will have a tremendous advantage over those who have learned to rely on the fret markers. When I first began learning to play guitar I relied on the fret markers to help me find my place on the fretboard. But when I started playing for audiences on dark stages, I recognized the limitations of not being ...


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