4

Flamenco requires very crisp response for fast, powerful melodic play even in the bass register (as well as for parts that would in other styles be played on specialised bass instruments). That requires high-tension bass strings: lower tension strings would clatter a lot against the frets, which would obscure the actual notes played. On the other hand, for ...


3

I suppose you might scratch the back of the neck if using a clamp-on that is too small (i.e. meant for thin neck, used on thick neck). But that might happen anyway if you are not careful. As you say, the curvature of capos is different for different applications. So when using a capo meant for a curved fretboard (e.g. electric) on a flat fretboard (e.g. ...


3

Using a curved capo on a flat fretboard or a flat capo on a curved fretboard may not damage the instrument, but it definitely will not work correctly as previous answers have detailed. For others who may read this post seeking the answer to the same question who are like me (visual learners), I have provided some pictures below to illustrate the problem ...


3

"Anon" here does not imply there is no "exact version." The composer or copyist referred to as "Anonymous of Schwerin" was most certainly a particular individual from that town. The only "anonymous" thing about him (almost certainly him, not her) was that we don't know his name. I would guess that the original manuscript was written in tablature. The piece ...


2

My guess would be that the parentheses indicate that something is optional. Since most of them occur on a dot before a lower note I'd say that they indicate that its up to you to decide whether to hold the first note over the lower one or not. Also since the piece is Anon, probably there's no exact version and so on the top line in your example the parenth ...


1

Most listeners can't tell the difference between bronze-wound strings and silver-wound. It is often said that the silver-wound strings (actually silver-plated copper) sound warmer, and that the bronze-wound strings are punchier. I say 'silver-plated copper wound' because pure silver winding would be prohibitively expensive. It all comes down to that ...


1

It's going to depend on what sort of capo. There are several different designs on the market, some of which rely purely on a spring to work. On a classical guitar with a beefier neck, they may be too tight. This isn't going to be a problem for the neck, but the tuning will suffer. The bigger problem is the shape of the fingerboard. A capo meant for a ...


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