14

When what we think of as the classical guitar was normalized, it was just after luthiers switched from friction pegs like you would see on violins to the geared open-backed pegs, which were the advanced cool new tech at the time. They hit an optimized form early, and couldn't make it better without making an large departure, like steel strings with higher ...


10

This slur is only on the second string, with the "p" denoting a "pull off" from 1st fret of second string. So yes, you need to do a "pull off" on the second string, while plucking the third open string.


7

A bit more detail following piiperi's good suggestion. First play a good clean chord. Try to have at least some fingers touching others. Then release pressure, but still keep fingers touching the strings. press down again, and strum, to check the sound is still clean. Do this with each chord several times. Next, play a chord, but this time, take your ...


7

If I understand you correctly, you might have a score like this... ...and because there are only two voices notated and no guitar chord symbols in the score you aren't sure what chords to play to ad-lib a fingerpicking accompaniment. If the music you are dealing with is Baroque or early classical style (my example above is from Handel), I think you could ...


6

Play the low E, then the C on 2nd string, 1st fret. Then, as you play the 3rd string open, you carefully pull off from 1st fret to open, 2nd string. The slur denotes legato, and the 'p' denotes how the writer wants that played legato. There are other ways to play legato, so he's being specific.


6

It's because the strings are different. If you look at the shafts that strings are wrapped around, on classical guitar they are plastic and have much larger diameter than on acoustic. Nylon strings have lower tension than steel ones, and stretch much, much more when pulled into tension. The shaft has to be larger so that more string can be wrapped around it, ...


6

Does anyone know anything about the dynamics of the notes generated with this 'reversed guitar neck technique'? Any references about it? It's basic physics. The frequency of the note played on nth fret can be calculated as fn = f0 · l0 / ln where f0 is frequency of the open string, l0 is length of the open string and ln is length of vibrating part of the ...


5

More than likely you've been fortunate, and no damage has occurred. The areas where it would manifest itself are around the bridge, where the body itself may be lifting, or the bridge itself is being ripped from the body. The bracing inside the body may have been affected or loosened by extra strain. The neck may be not as straight as it originally was, ...


5

In my opinion, if you're playing it as fast as you want and your hand does not hurt, then it's absolutely okay. (I think that when I played this piece (a couple of years ago), I actually used only one finger for the B string, most probably m. Alternating p-m-p-m-... is quite natural.) Alternating two (or more) fingers is very good if you want to play some ...


5

The main reason is that nylon strings need to be stretched much more than metal strings to raise the pitch by the same amount. For this reason classical guitars need thicker pegs with larger circumference, allowing to reach the desired pitch faster, with less rotations. Metal string guitars need thinner pegs for better control of the pitch while tuning. Some ...


5

Not a complete answer, but a bit long for a comment. In mechanics, a rectified tube has less tolerances (on its diameter for instance): the diameter alongside its length will be more uniform than a standard one. Obviously, this depends on the precision of the rectifying process… For a string, as its oscillation frequency depends on the weight by unit of ...


5

The bass line should imply the harmony; normally, strong beats will get the root or third and perhaps the fifth (or even the seventh in some cases) of the implied chord. Weak beats can have any note but usually are either tied to the bass of the previous beat or fill in with other notes to make a walking bass line. Normally the bass moves more slowly than ...


4

Practice the instantaneous pressing-down of the chord shape with your left hand fingers, without doing anything with your right hand. The pressing-down of strings makes a "hammer-on" sort of sound. It can't be as loud as fingering normally with your right hand, but try to make it reasonably loud, or at least loud enough to hear each of the fingered strings ...


4

When you ask about having two E notes on the guitar, did you mean why are there two E strings on a guitar, the high and low E strings? If so, the reason is that most music, especially before 1900 consisted largely of triads (3 note chords) and sevenths (4 note chords). Because the guitar has six strings and it's easier to play duplicated notes (perhaps in ...


4

I think the clearest analysis of the first three measures is: m1: Amin7 m2: Amin6 m3: Amin(b6) This reflects the presence of the pedal tone A and the chromatic descent G-F#-F in each measure. The B natural, being in a rhythmically weak position, serves primarily as a decorative lower neighbor to the C, rather than as part of the harmony.


4

Not knowing what instrument this was written for I found a recording and discovered it is guitar. This is important because guitarists will often let the notes of arpeggios ring out when played. I think the Am9-Am6/9 is justified for bars 1-2. @Aaron makes a good point about the B as a lower neighbor but since this is guitar music and the B’s are sustained ...


3

Unlike a violin, where intonation ios determined by left had finger positions, On a guitar, intonation is largely controlled by the positioning of the frets relative to each other and to the bridge. To a limited extent, intonation can be altered by, say, pressing down too hard on a given fret and taking the pitch sharp. In non-classical music of course, (...


3

The bridge with its intonation step for the B string says it's designed for steel. Maybe try lighter gauge strings. There is possibly a trussrod accessible inside the body, through the soundhole. Sight down the neck, and decide if lowering the saddle would work. Not a big job if so. Pics don't show the relief, and that's crucial. If the neck's not pretty ...


3

Thank you for including more information, it is very important to see and hear things in context, like knowing the key and time signatures in order to be able to give an accurate answer. The notes happen at about 3:56 and are at the top of page 4. The arrows indicate shifting the positioning so the 1st finger extends towards the nut and playing the F and Eb ...


3

In the note numbering system for octaves and registers the starting point is C, not A so B3 is followed ascending chromatically by C4 and G#3 is followed ascending chromatically by A3.


3

The open-source notation program LilyPond is really helpful in this respect. You can input music in normal notation: \new Staff \relative { a,8 a' <c e> a d,8 a' <d f> a } And by changing \new Staff to \new TabStaff, LilyPond automatically compiles it in tablature notation: \new TabStaff \relative { a,8 a' <c e> a d,8 a' <d f&...


3

Aquila has a "low A" string set for baritone ADGCEA tuning, and even a "low E" set for EADGBE - one octave lower than standard (same as Bass VI tuning). Both are intended for normal scale classical guitars. All strings are wound in both sets. I think the low-A set sounds better, which shouldn't be surprising given the instrument being ...


3

My first thought was the same as the other answers: input into a notation program then add a tab staff. But, that's not much of a shortcut, because the input is time consuming if done manually. Personally, I've only added tab staff in MelodyAssistant. It was good, but sometimes chose frets that I didn't like. You might face the same issue in another program. ...


3

"Lazy" notation like this is very common in solo works. To be theoretically correct, there should be some sort of tuplet to squeeze the notes into the available space. In this case, that would mean making the notes one duration shorter and writing a 19:16 tuplet. However, that would make it seem as if the composer intended that precise rhythmic ...


3

I have a theory that many guitar manufacturers leave good looking wood finishes for natural guitars, and those which have blemishes, or don't look as good, are painted, often black. Either won't really affect the sound of the particular guitar, but it means more guitars can be made and sold - in fact, some players prefer coloured guitars. Could be that this ...


3

I agree mim imi may feel unnatural, and also may make articulation more difficult to control. Consider: aim aim or mia mia. If the purpose is building technique, that will certainly help to activate the a finger and let you work on useful patterns.


3

You really need to provide a definition of long for the question to make any sense. If you look at a classical method book from one of the greats, like Pepe Romero or Christopher Parkening, you will see that the nails of the "strumming hand" should not be very long at all maybe a millimeter or two beyond the flesh. The string should touch the ...


3

My advice - additional to other answers - is to play hundreds of Baroque and classical pieces arranged for Guitar or Keyboard with thorough bass notation, there you‘ll have the chords and a musically written bass line. From this examples you will be able to derive your own theory for good voicing and counterpoint. https://www.pdfdrive.com/search?q=Bach+...


2

If you know the chords well that is a plus. When changing chords during strumming, quickly lift all your fingers simultaneously off the strings of the first chord and with the shape of the next chord in your head try and make your fingers change to the new shape all at once and land simultaneously on the next chord. The idea is to make it one consolidated ...


2

One can pick using any number of right hand patterns. For really fast tremolo it is usually better to alternate because it makes no sense to think that one can use the same finger twice at a high speed. Of course there are exceptions to every rule. I would request that you post a picture of the sheet music so we can see what you are doing. It is diffcult ...


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