9

In English, it's called closed score. Open score means one instrument or voice per staff, as with most SATB choral music. Open score is easier to analyze, but often harder to sight-read because the shape of the fingering hand (guitar) or each hand (piano) isn't immediately visible on the page. Open score also occupies more space on the page, so it ...


8

You fell victim to the horrible inconsistencies of harmonics notation. There are lots of ways of notating them, for example: Notating the actual sounding pitches (which is, in my humble opinion, the only good way to do it). Notating the empty strings that need to be sounded, and placing a number that says at which fret the harmonic needs to be sounded ...


5

This can be a rather complex process. If you want to infer something about the geometry and materials of the bracings and the quality of the tone produced you had better make sure you have all the guitars in the exact same set up in the lab and that the microphone or other device is mounted at the same location relative to the guitar. The acoustic field ...


4

It's not really fretting two fingers on the same string for any purpose. The chord at that point has four notes (that's what I hear), and the index finger is easier to use if it strays onto the 3rd string as well. No reason other than convenience and comfort. It could have been put on the top/second string with the tip lower, but that didn't happen.


4

NH and <> both mean the same thing. They're natural harmonics


3

Fluorocarbon have a harder, more direct response and feel, and less of a “singing” tone. In some sense, switching from nylon to FC has a similar effect as switching to a longer scale length. For an electric-guitar analogy: it feels like switching from a Les Paul to a Strat (though obviously the difference is not so extreme). Most of that difference is just ...


3

I'm assuming you're talking about fretting-hand information here, since picking fingers are usually as p-i-m-a, not numbers. Given the size of the internet, there surely must be some resources, but a generalized one? Doubtful. It's more important to keep in mind that all fingerings in sheet music are partly hints & guidelines. No two hands are the same,...


3

The top package has silver and/or nickel windings on the bottom three strings, the bottom package has 80/20 bronze windings on the bottom three strings. That’s why the packages have those words on the front. I’m not sure but I expect the top package has a brighter tone and is intended for classical style guitar. The bottom package probably has a darker ...


3

No advantages for guitarists. They are used to reading everything on the treble clef, even though they play an octave lower than written. If they had to read bass clef as well, te notes would only go as low as the third space up, so there's no advantage.


3

Oh boy, this is a can of worms. I suggest trawling around youtube for advice. There is also the Delcamp classical guitar forum which has various long disussions about nails. The best shape for the nails depends on so many factors that little general advice is possible. For most players it's a long process of experiment. If you're using standard flamenco ...


3

Can't think why any string needs to go through the hole twice! Difficult to describe in words, but here goes. Put one end of a string through the hole in the bridge, pushing away from the soundhole. Pull 3-4" through. take that end over the bridge, round the long part of the string, and wrap it round itself a couple of times. One more wind takes the end ...


2

Please, please, please, take the steel string off the classical. You will destroy it quickly. Classical guitars usually have a soft wood top and different bracing pattern inside. Steel string acoustics have a hard wood top and stronger bracings. I have personally seen this at a middle school in Chicago where someone decided to put steel strings on a ...


2

Something that took me a long to realise but helped me in the end was to realise that a slow piece of music is still music. Before that I'd seen practising slowly as a tedious mechanical way to get to be able to play fast. For me,'slow enough' is the speed at which my mind is able to listen to and interpret the music as I play. The notes remain the same but ...


2

I have the same problem. I see this is a very old post, but thought I may contribute anyway. It may help someone. I have the problem not because of a lack of calluses. I have played for 40 years, and for the past several have played for hours every day.I have had well developed calluses for a very long time. But I also have an autoimmune disease which has ...


2

It's not essential that you go through the tuning roller twice - that's just a general instruction, and the gauge of your string might prevent you from doing it. The purpose is to increase the friction so the string doesn't slip. If you can't go through twice, go once with enough of a 'tail' to place under the next wrap or two of strings - then the string ...


2

When played without an accent on the second 3/4's downbeat, then you're right in hearing it as 4/4 + 2/4 or, more pedantically, 3/2. That accent may often be omitted because it would distract from the melody, which is more interesting than the straightforward harmony. Why do "they" still notate it as 3/4? Because how it progresses from teacher to pupil ...


2

When you hear the buzzing, try touching small bit of string between the bridge and the peg. If this is the case, you can install a dampener (bit of rag) or restring that string (do an image search to find different ways of tying a classical string). Another possibility is the string between the nut and tuning pegs, but that shouldn't be as loud. Last, it ...


2

The harmonics on fret 7 give notes that are the 5th of the open string. So - on 6th string, tuned to D, the harmonic sounds like an A note. The 7th fret harmonic on the A string will sound like an E, and theat on the 4th string will be another A note. One finger across all three strings will do it, unless you favour 3 fingers. I guess the piece is in D ...


2

You look at the notes in the scale. Whichever of them happens to be E, A, D, G or B, (or an enharmonic equivalent) can potentially be played with an open string, at least from the one octave. And assuming that your guitar is tuned to regular E A D G B E tuning. The C major scale doesn't have any sharps or flats, and its notes are: C, D, E, F, G, A, B From ...


2

Most proper classical guitar music, arrange by guitarists for guitarists, will contain numerical indicators in the sheet music for (1) the position, (2) which left hand finger to use for a note, (3) which string the note should be played on, and (4) which right hand finger should be used to pluck the note. This is a lot of information and is essentially TAB....


1

Unless the guitars are individually built guitars and not "shop" produced, then they likely follow standard, traditional construction. I have personally never run across building instructions that take into account different string tensions in regards to the face and bracing, although I am not a classical guitar maker, and things may have changed or be ...


1

Best approach is the conservative one. Find a luthier and have them evaluate the instrument. Using high-tension strings on older instruments can possibly cause irreparable damage.


1

It's not possible to generalize, since the overall tone is shaped by many different variables (as Tim mentioned in the comments), and in the specific case of spruce vs cedar, the difference seems to be subtle. Given two identical guitars, one with spruce tonewood, and other with cedar tonewood, there will be differences in tone, albeit small. Spruce is the ...


1

It is very difficult to generalize, and you surely can find many counter examples. Advanced musicians often go beyond the basics of their primary style. I will try to answer anyway, based on my experience in classical guitar education and performing classical repertoire. Training in classical music puts large emphasis on continuity of the melody, or even ...


1

There are basically three different vibrating structures in a guitar (or any other stringed instrument). The first is the strings themselves, and second is the body of the instrument, and the third is the air inside the instrument, which is affected by the volume of the guitar and the area of the sound hole. If you simply record "notes played on the ...


1

What is the number of more-or-less independent voices that can be simultaneously played on a classical guitar by reasonably skilled players? Two? Three? Four? I don't think you can pick a particular number here; rather, I think the answer is that the more independent the voices are, the lower that number is going to be. One voice is always going to be ...


1

Barre (chord) and (possibly) Hammer-On. In the photo the index finger is holding down G and B strings. The ring finger is also fretting the G string. The index is making a barre across two strings. The ring is fretting on the G as well ... and would be removed and replaced perhaps with the index in place. If repeated that could be a hammer-on (and off). ...


1

For an acoustic guitar, Try lighter strings and brass bridge pins. Lighter strings cause decrease in volume and the brass pins will make up for that.


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