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4

Flamenco requires very crisp response for fast, powerful melodic play even in the bass register (as well as for parts that would in other styles be played on specialised bass instruments). That requires high-tension bass strings: lower tension strings would clatter a lot against the frets, which would obscure the actual notes played. On the other hand, for ...


2

"Anon" here does not imply there is no "exact version." The composer or copyist referred to as "Anonymous of Schwerin" was most certainly a particular individual from that town. The only "anonymous" thing about him (almost certainly him, not her) was that we don't know his name. I would guess that the original manuscript was written in tablature. The piece ...


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This parantheses mean ghost notes: Ghost notes and optional notes The best description of a ghost note, is a note that is felt but not heard. You will play the note softer, and without emphasis. The note is usually in-between 2 parentheses. In addition, notes in parentheses could mean optional notes. For instance, if a particular riff is repeated, but ...


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My guess would be that the parentheses indicate that something is optional. Since most of them occur on a dot before a lower note I'd say that they indicate that its up to you to decide whether to hold the first note over the lower one or not. Also since the piece is Anon, probably there's no exact version and so on the top line in your example the parenth ...


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Unless the guitars are individually built guitars and not "shop" produced, then they likely follow standard, traditional construction. I have personally never run across building instructions that take into account different string tensions in regards to the face and bracing, although I am not a classical guitar maker, and things may have changed or be ...


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Best approach is the conservative one. Find a luthier and have them evaluate the instrument. Using high-tension strings on older instruments can possibly cause irreparable damage.


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You look at the notes in the scale. Whichever of them happens to be E, A, D, G or B, (or an enharmonic equivalent) can potentially be played with an open string, at least from the one octave. And assuming that your guitar is tuned to regular E A D G B E tuning. The C major scale doesn't have any sharps or flats, and its notes are: C, D, E, F, G, A, B From ...


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