15

How much does it take to learn how to play the triangle? 10 seconds. How much does it take to know how to play the triangle? Hundreds of hours of practice, years of experience. Just like many "simple" activities (such as taking a photo), while the concept is simple (just push the button on your camera), it takes knowledge and experience to get it ...


11

This is common in high school, non-conservatory college, and community orchestras and bands. In a professional group, or in a conservatory where the students are working towards being professionals, percussion parts will always be played by percussionists. But outside of this, personnel may be limited, and particular pieces may call for more players than are ...


7

As a trombonist who also played piano I used to get a lot of this in my Youth Orchestra days. A triangle part, a few notes on a glockenspiel. It's hardly advanced technique, you can learn how very easily. But I was sometimes surprised by my capability of messing up such a simple job! Possibly because I was laying too much importance on it. Playing a ...


4

French composers at that time were writing for smaller, tenor trombones. Remember, too, that Franck was not writing for a bass trombone, but, as most French composers of the time, for three tenors, which makes his foray into the high range more understandable. Even Berlioz wrote rarely for bass trombone (the only example I have found is in his "Funeral ...


3

Playing a triangle is not difficult: playing a triangle at the right time is rather more complex. Most musicians are playing a large part of the time, with relatively short rests: it is not too difficult to keep track of where you are in the score. Percussionists often have dozens of bars of rest. If you only have the percussion score, it requires a rather ...


2

Without a picture, I'll try to narrow things down. Start with the position of the guitar. The lower the whole guitar is against your body, the worse the problem will become. Sitting or standing, to alleviate your problem, hold it as high as possible. That means your hand can wrap under the neck more easily. If it's on a strap, it is where it is. Sitting, ...


2

It's all about proper posture & technique. Practice is important, but only if you practice the right thing. Here is quick summary Most important: wrist position. Shove out the wrist as far away from as possible and make sure the wrist is bent inwards as far as you can and then some more. The palm of your hand should be above the fret board as much as ...


2

It might take all of five minutes for a cello, violin, oboe, double bass player (not ignoring others!) to acclimatise themselves with a triangle. Especially if it was to be a single 'ting' at the appropriate moment. A tremolo may take a little longer, but basically, like all in the percussion section, all players have to be able to count really well, so any ...


2

Perhaps the clarinettist in your first clip provides a clue. Berlioz made great use of the brass. But was the required sound as heavy as would be produced by today's wide-bore instruments? The clarinettist would have been blown out of the room! Those instruments are reasonably authentic for Berlioz's time. More interesting, perhaps, is the lack of a ...


1

This piece is a romantic-era throwback to the earlier style. Here is a broad outline of how one can determine the style for this and other pieces. Begin with the title The title of a piece is clearly the first clue, in part because it suggests the era, but even more so because it suggests the style. A waltz in any era can be expected to be in 3/4 time, for ...


1

Many classical guitarists fret the strings on part of the finger tip that is closer to the nail. My father did this and developed calluses that sloped back from the tip towards the nail. This is a little extreme but his playing was exceptional in his youth. I tend to be right on the tip and I only go a little off in extreme cases, but not as a regular ...


1

Maybe you have unusually large fingers. So choose a guitar that has a wider fret-board. But guitarists come in all sorts of shapes and sizes, most of them get around this problem, either by technique or by adjusting the action of the guitar. You have a classical guitar and say it seems set up well enough. 99% certain it's a technique problem then. You ...


1

It’s impossible to judge without seeing the guitar, but maybe your action is way too high. The further your string needs to move to contact the fret, the deeper your finger needs to go beneath the plane of your open strings, and the more difficult it then becomes to avoid touching those open strings. Take it in for an inspection by a luthier, and leave it ...


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