11

By the way you're framing the question, it looks like you're assuming "expression of a topic" is the leading impetus of the Romantic movement. It was certainly part of it, but the Romantic was so much more than that: it dealt with individuality/autobiography, a oneness with Nature, expression of the mystic/religious/supernatural, bucking conventional musical ...


10

You're looking for the Biamonti Catalogue. An online version with MIDI versions of some works is available here.


8

This is indeed a very itchy question: It is obviously quite difficult for contemporaries to compose like Haydn or Mozart without appearing to be mere imitators - or worse: just nasty forgers! Unfortunately, there are indeed quite a lot of strange examples for the latter: Remember the counterfeits made by the famous violonist Fritz Kreisler (1875-1962) who ...


7

I'm going out on some limbs here because I'm not an expert in early music keyboards. But here are some observations: From the very start, harpsichordists are expected to be able to participate in dynamic contrasts. Most often, a skilled continuo player knows how to alter their interpretation and technique as dynamics come and go, e.g. playing more or fewer ...


7

We typically classify these chords by what their bass notes do. Thus a passing six-four is so named because the bass functions as a passing note; the same is true for the arpeggiating six-four. Your auxiliary six-four is also often called a "pedal" six-four, and once again that term describes the bass. The cadential six-four, a subset of this pedal ...


5

Yes. The slur just indicates that the note should touch the preceding note, but it's still played on time and ended according to the staccato dot. Basically, a slur does not change the last note it reaches but only the notes before it.


4

There is another excellent use of the metronome in learning technically challenging passages that I can recommend. To wit: Play the passage at whatever speed, however slow, that you are absolutely sure you can play it correctly. Raise the metronome one tick and play it again. If you play it correctly, raise it again. If you don't, take it back down one. ...


4

In counterpoint, "chords" are incidental - the result of proper voice-leading rules and carefully controlled dissonance. What matters more is whether or not all of the intervals are consonant, and if they are not, how you are controlling the dissonance (whether or not it is being handled appropriately.) Because the rules are the way they are, then lend ...


3

Just because the four seasons can be summarized as program music, i.e. containing some extra-musical narrative (found in many eras), is simply not enough, to qualify. There are some composers, which are somewhat on the boundary between two eras, but Vivaldi is none of them. After baroque follows classical, and on classical follows romantic, so the eras are ...


3

See: Using historical accounts of harpsichord touch to empirically investigate the production and perception of dynamics on the 1788 Taskin (2015) This article investigates the extent of production and perception of dynamic differences on a French historical harpsichord, extensively revised in 1788 by Pascal Taskin. A historical review reports on the ...


2

Linking between the renaissance and baroque periods you could say that Monteverdi was a pivotal figure, and also of importance, Giovanni Gabrieli. Monteverdi's Vespers is a great example of mixing the old style with the new. To usher in the classical via late baroque or rococo, I agree with the above comments about CPE Bach. Not sure that I can single out ...


2

There must be examples of this sort of thing? Not particularly functional, but if you count the passing result of an Alberti Bass as a second inversion, I guess this qualifies too?


2

If by "known" you mean renowned, then no. Too much has happened in the 200 years since, and a professional composer simply couldn't bear ignoring a huge part of the possibilities which we now know to exist. It can be done, sure, for instance when a director wants an authentic-sounding but non-authentic soundtrack for a period movie. Any competent ...


2

David Cope in "Computer Models of Musical Creativity" points out (rare) cases where Bach used parallel fifths in his chorales. In analysis, the alternatives are less satisfactory than Bach's use of the parallel fifth. Students of counterpoint, however, will very likely be expected to find some other way to resolve such a case that does not involve simply ...


2

I agree with much of the answers. For me they are great but yes it can get tricky with modern key changes, but if you think of modulations as phrases that arrive at a goal (unless abruptly jumping right into a new key with out prep) then thinking in terms of common harmonic patterns into the new goal key as I can be useful. Let's say I'm in Cmajor and now ...


2

Even if you don't use metronome regularly, it is always a good practice to play with metronome at least once after you become fluent with a piece. You will find many passages that you are unconsciously changing the tempo that you were not aware of before and feel a steady tempo. This practice helps learning when and why you swing tempo throughout a piece and ...


1

I'd say the main difference between rondo and ritornello is one of emphasis. In a typical rondo, the 'refrain' carries the main musical interest or idea, with the 'couplets' providing relief and variety between its repetitions. In a baroque concerto allegro, on the other hand, the ritornello tends to serve as a brief 'appetizer' or 'motto' for the more ...


1

One meaning is, of course, music from the 'Classical era' - whether you see this as European 'art music' written between 1750 and 1810, or lay the chronological boundaries slightly wider, the meaning seems fairly clear. At the other end of the spectrum, 'classical' seems refer to an approximate, and somewhat arbitrary, sociological boundary around a range ...


1

1) At its most specific, classical refers to music specifically written between 1730 and 1820, what we call the Classical era. This usage is pretty limited and is most common in actual discussions of music history and related topics. 2) Getting a little more general, we can include music from the boroque era to the romantic era, or roughly 1600 through 1850....


1

Cyclic integration is making the movements of a multi-movement work more similar to each other. This is typically done by having later movements quote themes from earlier movements--the start of the last movement of Beethoven's 9th Symphony is a great example, as it starts off by semi-quoting the first 3 movements. This paper tries to argue that cyclic ...


1

I think your observation is correct. In the Baroque period, although the solo instrument(s) were generally scored in the tutti sections, there are a few works where they are in the habit of laying out until their featured entry.


1

Haydn: Baroque to Classical Cage: Serialism to Aleatoric Webern: Romantic to Serialism


1

Roman numeral analysis (RNA) has a variety of limitations — such as in analyzing non-Tonal music — as outlined in other answers. However, there is a specific and ongoing "controversy" among music theorists with regard to RNA. Beginning in the mid 1980s, a number of influential theorists began constructing what is now known as neo-Riemannian theory, ...


1

Pianists who practice by themselves sometimes have trouble playing in time with others. Time is so important in a musical group, that members can be fired for just not having the right "feel", even if their time is technically correct. e.g. Pete Best If a pianist wants to work on their group playing skills, and they don't have a group, practice with a ...


1

If you take a look at the St John's Passion by Bach, it is surprisingly operatic with its use of turba choirs and the kind of introductory chorus and the dying scenes. It is true that Bach was employed by churches for large stretches of his time (as opposed to his time in Köthen, for example), including his final years. But if you take a look at his magnum ...


1

The Classical Style: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, by Charles Rosen (2nd ed., 1998, W. W. Norton) is very highly regarded. Worldcat link. A greatly expanded edition of the National Book Award-winning masterpiece by a world-class pianist and writer on music. This outstanding book treating the three most beloved composers of the Vienna School is basic to any ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible