Hot answers tagged

6

It may look a bit like a question mark, but it's not the same thing, and they aren't related. To understand the evolution of the clefs, we need to go back a bit in music history. Because of this, I'll actually be showing you some four-line clefs (as opposed to our modern clefs with five lines). But we begin with the notion of a C clef: this literally puts ...


5

I don't really know the history enough to be certain, but I imagine it comes out of the Medieval hexachord system where the three hexachord types were based on F, C, and G. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guidonian_hand#The_hexachord_in_the_Middle_Ages


4

To answer the 1. part of your question: If you think it looks like a question mark this your personal impression and association, and it can't be answered like you were asking: Why looks the letter F like a flag? The second part is the conclusion of the 1. point: Not at all! They are not related and have nothing to do with each other. Like Richard has ...


3

Like Michael says the C- and F-clef come from the Guidonian hand ans show where the semitone lies: below C or F When F was altered to the lead tone F# the semitone was lying below G. If we look at the 5 lines of the staff we couldn't see the semitones (without the clefs) as all lines have the same distance. Riemann writes in his CATECHISM OF MUSICAL ...


1

The bass clef is a letter F, for "Fa", which is the note on the line between the two dots, i.e. the second line from the top. In a similar way, the treble clef is a letter S, for "Sol" (G) which is the note on the second line from the bottom, i.e. the position encircled by the large loop of the symbol. In other words, the bass clef is a letter F which ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible