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18

Certainly not the first. The second is unobjectionable. But why not the third? It's the standard notation, and is just fine.


12

Can the bass clef be transformed to the treble clef in piano music? Yes but please don't. It seems like it would be much easier to read. No. You will be making Middle C be a line in one staff and a space in the other. Bass cleff continues directly from treble with middle C being the one ledger line between them. Is there a compelling reason not to do ...


11

There are three modern pitched clefs: , the G-clef , the C-clef (less common) , the F-clef Note that I didn't call them treble, alto, and bass. That's because the meaning of the clef depends on where it appears horizontally on the stave: For the G-clef, the line passing through the middle of the swirly bit (technical term) is G4. For the C-clef, the line ...


9

This is definitely bad type setting. I'm not aware of any conventional C clef that sits between two lines (although you can of course roll your own), but even if this was supposed to be between two lines, the answer would still be: Bad type setting.


9

It is common for piano staff to change clefs. There can be passages with both hands playing G clef or passages with both hands playing F clef. You really need to read both clefs, and getting familiar with C clef is a good idea too. Can the bass clef be transformed to the treble clef in piano music? How can you do this with printed music without re-...


8

I'd go with the second or the third, depending on the clef that you need before and after this passage. The first one feels more uncomfortable that the others.


8

As reported by Borland in The Journal of the Society of Arts Vol. 53, No. 2727 (FEBRUARY 24, 1905), pp. 349-374, the double treble clef was conceived by Otto Goldschmidt and published in the “Bach Choir Magazine”, a publication of the Bach Choir music society. The double treble clef was used for the tenor voices, but the symbol did not gain a very wide ...


8

It is the same as the "standard" notation for tenor voices, written using the G clef and sounding an octave lower than written. The vestige of a C clef on the 4th line (i.e. a "tenor clef") is an indication that this isn't a standard treble clef. The more common notation is a small 8 below the clef. Looking at the music in the score makes it clear that is ...


7

I came up with my own mnemonic, having recently encountered some automotive-themed phrases for learning the Alto Clef. Dodges, Fords And Chevs Everywhere (for the lines) Ethanol Gas Breaks Down (For the spaces) Yeah, I know not the best, but even this would have gotten me on my way had it come up in a search.


7

Since generally speaking the bass clef is played with l.h. and treble with r.h., and the hands are different, it makes sense that music for piano is written using both clefs. I imagine nearly all piano players would understand and appreciate that. However, if you wanted to transcribe the bass clef notes so they sat in a treble clef, you could do that. A lot ...


7

If you really want to learn to read bass clef, do the opposite of what you are suggesting. Rewrite the treble clef parts in the bass clef, and learn by total immersion. Any music notation software can do this easily. But spending time playing only the left hand parts of pieces will probably work just as well. Choose pieces where the left hand has plenty of ...


6

If you can read piano parts from a grand staff, all you need to do is remember that the "clef line" is middle C. Read the lines above that as the bottom of a treble clef staff, and the lines below as the top of a bass clef staff. This works for all the C clefs - soprano, mezzo, alto, tenor, and baritone. Working with orchestral scores, you usually get ...


6

This isn't exactly a mnemonic, but I've always found it helpful to think of common chords being notated in a clef. Once I have those images in my mind, I learn the pitches very quickly. It's very convenient in alto clef. In that clef, a clear IV–V7–I in C is just "bottom three lines," "spaces," and "top three lines": We can adapt a similar process for ...


6

Actually the bass clef seamlessly fits below the violin clef, which means, you will recognize a cross-system scale easily. If you are prepared to write all your scores yourself, this may be an option, but fairly few will be able to play from that. The bass clef is not that difficult, and it is worth the effort to learn it.


5

Guido de Arezzo invented the line system around 1025. He used a "c" or "f" to originally describe half steps. The drawing seems a little bit inaccurate, as in the beginning the top of "f" or "F" was positioned right at the second line, while later the two dots encompassed this line (which is the f.) Also - the "f" key was originally derived from the Bariton ...


5

So, here we have a clef change. The line before the line in question has the bottom staff in the bass clef, and in our first line here, the music begins with the treble clef. This change of clefs happens of on the first bar of the new line. So, why do we write a bass clef, only, only to have it immediately change to a treble clef? Why not just start the next ...


4

Making up ones own mnemonics is probably easier in the long run, as they're more personal. I do that with guitar string names - like Elephants And Donkeys Grow Big Ears, although I prefer going 1st string to 6th. Since the tenor clef moves C to the second line down, the letter names, rising, are D F A C E - same as treble clef spaces, with D underneath. 'D(...


4

I'd guess you're trying to improve readability by reducing the use of ledger lines? below or above? The thing is, the piano is an instrument which is notable for it's range (on paper, a wider range of pitches than a standard orchestra). So pianists have to handle these a lot, and most will be used to reading off either end of the score (depending on their ...


3

Every other C clef I've seen in the assignment puts middle C squarely on a line, not a space In some old scores, the C clef is used in the third space (not the second) in tenor voice parts. Apart from the clef, the notation is the same as writing tenor parts an octave higher than they are sung using the treble clef. Some scores have the treble and "octave ...


3

In the Musescore edit view just press "i" to open the "Instruments" dialog. Then you can rearrange the staves.


3

It's the same advice (of course) I give and adopt for most things. Lots of practice. Play or sing lots of music using bass clef. I still don't read the alto and tenor clefs (not to mention the soprano clef) that well. However, when composing music for viola, I always leave in the C clefs to force myself to read these. None of these are too hard. The G clefs ...


3

In MuseScore, click 'Show MIDI import'. You'll see that the Left Hand piano stave is above the Right Hand one. Select it, click the down arrow, click Apply. The RH and LH staves will now be the right way round. Or do it in the Instruments page.


3

There is a lot of speculation in other answers, but this question actually has a very specific and exact historical answer, at least regarding the F and C clefs. To summarize, the basic answer is that Guido of Arezzo decided to use F and C as anchor notes in the early to mid 11th century, mostly to indicate that these notes had a semitone below them. The G ...


3

Check out Norman Weinberg’s Guide to Standardized Drumset Notation. http://www.normanweinberg.com/uploads/8/1/6/4/81640608/940506pn_guildines_for_drumset.pdf Weinberg's guide is used as a starting point for other publishers, like MIT's Audio Graffiti drum notation guide: Typically in the multi percussion literature there is a legend beside the clef, as in ...


2

It would be more usual to have a (small) cautionary treble clef at the end of the previous stave, start the new one with a normal, full-size clef. You sometimes see it done the way shown in hand-written scores using pre-printed 'piano layout' manuscript paper. But the example looks like it's been prepared in Sibelius. It is actually quite hard to make ...


2

In my opinion, an experienced euphonium player should be able to read tenor clef. It's expected of trombone players, and plenty of euphonium plays also play trombone music, so they should have spent the time learning tenor clef. And if you're writing something that's this high so consistently, I'm assuming it's written for a more advanced player. Ergo, ...


2

There is a fairly good correlation between the standardization on treble and bass clefs, the standardization of the compass of keyboard instruments at 5 octaves symmetrically about middle C (i.e. F to F or G to G, not C to C as with most modern 5-octave keyboards), and the growth of the music printing and publishing industry. 16th century keyboard music was ...


2

You could try thinking of it in this way. Concentrate on middle C. In the treble clef it is of course on the first leger line below the stave. Imagine handing over the same note to the bass clef, so it's now on the first leger line above the stave. The bass clef is just a continuation of the treble clef in this way. Once you understand that concept, you ...


2

A method I employed was to start with what I would call "anchor notes." Based on what @Jomiddnz suggested, perhaps begin with C, as middle C is the first ledger line above the staff (when the F-clef is notated), and know that the second space from the bottom of the staff is also C. From C, I used perfect intervals because they were approximately in the ...


1

With regard to an example, which user45266 requested in a comment above, I just came across this situation in a score yesterday, which is what prompted me to investigate, and, ultimately, led me here. Unless this joint was ghostwritten by Ives, the clef is unambiguously indicating that the third space should be middle-C. The full score is here.


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