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21

Yes, that's a bass clef / F-clef. They've had many different versions in the past, as indicated in the Wikipedia article you linked to. It mentions French and British publications but it looks like Spanish music used it as well. So the first notes in the first example are D and A, and in the second example they're both B♭.


15

Switching clefs is not uncommon. It can provide notational convenience when a part shifts to a higher or lower range than the current clef easily encompasses. However, the piece you've posted is an exercise in reading clefs and quickly shifting between them. It's highly unusual, but useful for training as a conductor, for example, where switching from clef ...


13

The sheet music you posted is a solfege exercise, that's why it contains all those clef changes. (etude de solfege = study of solfege = solfege exercise) And note that there are not only clef changes, but also time signature changes all over the place. Again, it's an exercise. In actual practice, clef changes are not frequent, but can be found occasionally. ...


12

Can the bass clef be transformed to the treble clef in piano music? Yes but please don't. It seems like it would be much easier to read. No. You will be making Middle C be a line in one staff and a space in the other. Bass cleff continues directly from treble with middle C being the one ledger line between them. Is there a compelling reason not to do ...


10

It may look a bit like a question mark, but it's not the same thing, and they aren't related. To understand the evolution of the clefs, we need to go back a bit in music history. Because of this, I'll actually be showing you some four-line clefs (as opposed to our modern clefs with five lines). But we begin with the notion of a C clef: this literally puts ...


9

It is common for piano staff to change clefs. There can be passages with both hands playing G clef or passages with both hands playing F clef. You really need to read both clefs, and getting familiar with C clef is a good idea too. Can the bass clef be transformed to the treble clef in piano music? How can you do this with printed music without re-...


9

This is definitely bad type setting. I'm not aware of any conventional C clef that sits between two lines (although you can of course roll your own), but even if this was supposed to be between two lines, the answer would still be: Bad type setting.


9

It's an "F" clef. Summary of historic clef signs including bass clef... ...from Stanford, A History of Music You might want to get away from calling them "bass" or "soprano" etc and use the letter they indicate like "F" clef, "C" clef, etc. because the history starts with literally writing the letter on a ...


8

That bass clef is necessary -- to indicate that the clef changes from treble to bass at the start of the second volta. Your argument that "any decent pianist is going to know" isn't valid, I'm afraid -- the change back to bass clef must be indicated. And that bass clef doesn't affect the Alberti bass because the bass clef was in the first-time section, and ...


8

As noted, this piece is an exercise designed to help students learn to switch between clefs with ease. For "real" music, here's what Elaine Gould has to say in "Behind Bars" (a common reference for music notation): For performance material, stay in one clef for as long as is practicable, using up to at least three ledger lines rather ...


8

Wikipedia says: Varying shapes of different clefs persisted until very recent times. The F-clef was, until as late as the 1980s in some cases (such as hymnals), or in British and French publications, written like this: Old bassclef But even if we couldn’t consult wikipedia we can derive from the key signature that this must be the F clef and F is on the ...


7

It might be drawn a bit scribbly but it certainly looks like a K-clef, (a stylistic variant of the C-clef). In particular it's an alto clef (which makes sense for viola). So those first few notes in the image are at the pitch of E above middle C. (With the two treble G-clefs directly above, the chord made (E, G, B) is an E minor chord in close position.


7

If you really want to learn to read bass clef, do the opposite of what you are suggesting. Rewrite the treble clef parts in the bass clef, and learn by total immersion. Any music notation software can do this easily. But spending time playing only the left hand parts of pieces will probably work just as well. Choose pieces where the left hand has plenty of ...


7

Since generally speaking the bass clef is played with l.h. and treble with r.h., and the hands are different, it makes sense that music for piano is written using both clefs. I imagine nearly all piano players would understand and appreciate that. However, if you wanted to transcribe the bass clef notes so they sat in a treble clef, you could do that. A lot ...


6

Actually the bass clef seamlessly fits below the violin clef, which means, you will recognize a cross-system scale easily. If you are prepared to write all your scores yourself, this may be an option, but fairly few will be able to play from that. The bass clef is not that difficult, and it is worth the effort to learn it.


6

To answer the 1. part of your question: If you think it looks like a question mark this your personal impression and association, and it can't be answered like you were asking: Why looks the letter F like a flag? The second part is the conclusion of the 1. point: Not at all! They are not related and have nothing to do with each other. Like Richard has ...


6

It looks a bit like a hand-written C-clef. Reading as such seems to make sense harmonically.


5

I don't really know the history enough to be certain, but I imagine it comes out of the Medieval hexachord system where the three hexachord types were based on F, C, and G. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guidonian_hand#The_hexachord_in_the_Middle_Ages


4

Like Michael says the C- and F-clef come from the Guidonian hand ans show where the semitone lies: below C or F When F was altered to the lead tone F# the semitone was lying below G. If we look at the 5 lines of the staff we couldn't see the semitones (without the clefs) as all lines have the same distance. Riemann writes in his CATECHISM OF MUSICAL ...


3

The logical way to get rid of the bass clef is to get rid of the treble clef two bars before, but some editors think pianists can't read leger lines. Then, a treble clef can go after the repeat barline, where it belongs. That is was done in the first NMA edition (1878). However the editorial policy of the second NMA edition is more strictly "urtext", ...


3

There is a lot of speculation in other answers, but this question actually has a very specific and exact historical answer, at least regarding the F and C clefs. To summarize, the basic answer is that Guido of Arezzo decided to use F and C as anchor notes in the early to mid 11th century, mostly to indicate that these notes had a semitone below them. The G ...


3

It's the same advice (of course) I give and adopt for most things. Lots of practice. Play or sing lots of music using bass clef. I still don't read the alto and tenor clefs (not to mention the soprano clef) that well. However, when composing music for viola, I always leave in the C clefs to force myself to read these. None of these are too hard. The G clefs ...


3

Every other C clef I've seen in the assignment puts middle C squarely on a line, not a space In some old scores, the C clef is used in the third space (not the second) in tenor voice parts. Apart from the clef, the notation is the same as writing tenor parts an octave higher than they are sung using the treble clef. Some scores have the treble and "octave ...


3

Depends what you mean by common, but yes clef changes are common. It seems to me clef changes were more common in the past. When I compare various pkeyboard editions of music at IMSLP.org it seems older editions that use clef changes where a newer edition will apparently avoid them. I particularly notice a modern avoidance of C clef. In an exercise I wouldn'...


3

It's the bass clef. Standard. Often called the F clef because the two dots are either side of the F note line. It has various incarnations, but it's still the basic bass clef. Whatever strange sign is there, the two dots will tell 'F clef'. So, the two sharps will always be F and C.


2

You could try thinking of it in this way. Concentrate on middle C. In the treble clef it is of course on the first leger line below the stave. Imagine handing over the same note to the bass clef, so it's now on the first leger line above the stave. The bass clef is just a continuation of the treble clef in this way. Once you understand that concept, you ...


2

A method I employed was to start with what I would call "anchor notes." Based on what @Jomiddnz suggested, perhaps begin with C, as middle C is the first ledger line above the staff (when the F-clef is notated), and know that the second space from the bottom of the staff is also C. From C, I used perfect intervals because they were approximately in the ...


2

"Common" requires some criterion like "as often as not". I would not say it's common but it does happen. It is an accepted regular practice. I can cite an example right now, the sheet music for Papagena/Papageno that I am working from has the soprano and tenor on the same line in the beginning, switching back and forth rapidly. This ...


1

It looks like an Ut3 clef: C (Do) e.g Ut is on the 3rd line. So I read 4xE 8th twice and 4xB 8th twice. As ttw points out this makes sense harmonically: first chord is B G E (from top to bottom): G major chord G-B-E.


1

No. A bass clef is not a question mark. They are two completely different things, and not related whatsoever. A bass clef is a music symbol placed at the beginning of a music staff to indicate that the following notes are low-pitched and are written in the bass clef. The bass clef is also called the F clef, because it evolved from the capital letter "F&...


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