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4

This is some sort of old style tenor clef. Basically you have a G-clef with a tenor-C-clef superimposed, just to indicate that this is for tenor voice and thus transposed an octave down. So this is bascially the same as an octavated G clef. It would be much more plausible if the C-clef actually were one note lower at the actual middle C, but I suppose this ...


5

I'd say trust the position of the flat and call it a G-clef. You can tell this is correct because the C instruments in the score are also in F. A quick perusal through the score also shows that... The tenors sing the same lines as the sopranos an octave lower on pages 125-126. The tenors sing pitches that make sense with the orchestration (see tenors and ...


2

Occasionally, this can be a useful and clear way to notate something which would otherwise look messy. I don't think it's a particularly 'old' way. Any notation program that supports clef symbols as simple, non-functioning graphic objects could notate this. Playback would be another matter! (Though easily enough achieved by muting the displayed notes and ...


5

3 alternatives to that notation that I can notate with Musescore are these: Cross-staff the lower staff's uppermost B so the slurred beam in the lower staff of the 3rd last measure connects a chord in the lower staff with a note in the upper staff Use 3 staves instead of 2 (heck, this also looks appropriate for the 4th last measure) Notate the lower staff's ...


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