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14

What is happening starting at 8:32 is what jazz players often refer to as an ending vamp. In this case it is a loop of 4 bars, one chord per bar that they are improvising over. This is basically the progression they are playing: Cm/E♭ D7 D♭maj7 Cm Although it seems like they speed up in fact they keep the same tempo but play more rhythmically and sometimes ...


11

Coda means tail, ending. Most pieces will (obviously) have an ending, and it's usually the point where the music comes down to its final resting place - using a cadence that indicates this. Here, there's a perfect cadence (V>I) so it feels like it's the ending. A coda is often a separate part of a piece, several bars long, that gets played after repeats ...


8

Codas are separate-sounding ends of pieces. They are generally found in more sectional pieces like sonata-allegros, ternary-form pieces, rondos, and even theme and variations. They are generally split off from the rest of the piece by a perfect (a.k.a. authentic) cadence. They also do not tend to precisely mirror any earlier sections (unlike the rest of the ...


2

If this should be a coda some how you could interpret each final group as a coda: repeating the same chords V-I, the same motif - only in different octaves like your example). But what does it matter ... except as a help to the members of an ensemble as orientation from where to start in a practice hour? Surely not to the audience! So this question seems ...


2

In general, a coda is merely a concluding section of a piece. When a coda sign is used, it's often just a section that is not part of previous repeats and only occurs once at the very end of the piece. A coda in that sense does not necessarily have any distinguishing or specific features other than being labeled as the final section. However, as other ...


1

Tim's and Dekkadeci's answers explains correctly what a coda is, but to add: the coda symbol is more of a way to shorten the length of the score by omitting the "da capo" repeated part (traditionally) or some other repeated section. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with the "actual" coda, as part of the structure of the piece.


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