30

Marching bands are about volume, projection, and power. A violin can't possibly match the projection of a brass instrument, and thus why they aren't included. That said, some bands have employed amplified string instruments, like electric bass, particularly for jazz and rock pieces.


19

These are both shorthand notations that refer to music occurring simultaneously in other staves. The first notation (the slashes) simply tell the performer to "do exactly what the other violins (the staff above you) are doing." This is especially clear when you consider, for instance, the following two portions of the score: This is just a practical ...


12

Actual marching bands don't have strings - I'm sure you could extend this list of reasons: Where would string players put sheet music? String instruments are expensive and fragile. Whilst you can buy a professional trumpet for a couple of grand, that doesn't buy you a professional quality violin. And although you can repair a dented trumpet, a snapped neck ...


5

Are some scales used more than others within a genre of music? Short answer: yes! I think an exploration of the relationship between genre and tonality could probably fill several very large books - partly because the term 'genre' itself can cover many different axes. For example, we can look at genre from a geographic point of view, and see that many ...


4

As Brian Thomas pointed out, there's a huge difference between a marching band and a musical composition called a "march." Marching bands are called that because, well, they march. Or in the case of Yale Univ., gyrate madly around the field. You won't find string instruments (mostly), double-reeds, and a few other oddball instruments in a fielded band. A ...


4

You are right. A point is the length of the piece: Bagatelles are short. One of Beethoven‘s pieces was too short to be edited by Peters. So he called it a Bagatelle. Originally Bagatelles had been written for piano. the character and style is light and lovely, mild. Translation of the German version of this link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagatelle_(...


3

I wrote this simple meoldy in A melodic minor but I can't seem to be able to find any appropriate accompaniment chords and corresponding 'bass' notes that would give me this Classicism Period feel that I'm going for. ...PS: I've never written any 'classical' music before Set that melody aside for the moment. If you have never written anything in classical ...


3

The instrumentation in a march and the use of wood wind instruments can be compared with the registration of an organ. The different instruments are employed in respect of their pitch level (SATB), as group of a family (brass section/woodwind section, or they are mixed together depending or in purpose of the color of the sound you want to create. Flutes ...


2

The simplest way to answer the question is for the OP to actually look at some marching band scores. There are two "minor" problems with that, of course: one is that there is a lot of garbage published on the web, and the second is that traditionally, marching band scores were often written in a very condensed form and the OP would most likely not be able ...


2

The answer to this is captured in the phrase De gustibus non est disputandum - "In matters of taste, there can be no disputes". In general, there's nothing theoretical that can tell you whether one piece of music is better than another piece of music in an artistic sense. A piece of music that I might think is good, you might think is terrible. Or I might ...


2

This type of harmonization is essentially what you would learn in the first one or two semesters of most music theory courses. So I recommend looking into some theory training. Depending on where you live, you may be able to take these courses at a local community college. EDIT: There are certainly other ways to learn these skills besides going to school. ...


1

You're not going to get the full range of any stereo signals in the final mix. That is, even if you plug L and R out into two inputs on the bar p.a., it's only going to produce mono, with exactly the same sounds coming from each of the p.a. speakers. Which is a shame. A lot of the sounds I use on keys are much more effective when listened to in stereo. ...


1

So I have some gears and instruments and they say that one Synthesizer I have should be connected in Stereo and not Mono, so I want to connect it in Stereo but the sound-system in the bar I want to jam in is working in Mono. So what's the point in connecting in stereo if the output is going to be in Mono anyway? Your synthesizer should work fine in mono. In ...


1

The output of your synth is sending two channels, left and right, and depending on what effects or settings you are using, different parts of the signal will be on one side or the other. If you record the output of just one side you may miss signal that you need. If your synth does not have a mono out in addition to the stereo output and you want to ...


1

Because stringed instruments are fragile and not very loud. And, traditionally, just because they don't. In the same way that brass bands don't have woodwinds and string quartets don't have trombones. If marching bands wanted strings, they'd find a way. Either some harness contrivance, or they'd put them in the 'pit' with the heavy percussion. And there'...


1

Some things in common practice are circumscribed like harmony, counterpoint, and non-chord tones. A lot of people like to say there aren't rules. Perhaps. But, Aloysius did tell Josephus when he made mistakes. A good cheat sheet can be used to check your handling of non-chord tones. But do I really have to stick to the rules of Bach and Mozart for ...


1

Absolutely. 2 bars is enough for a fugue subject. You might even say it's a 'happy medium' for subject length. In addition to The Well Tempered Clavier take a look at: Fischer, Adiadne Musica Pachelbel, Fugues on the Magnificant Both have some similarities with The Well Tempered Clavier, they are collections of fugues moving systematically through ...


1

I think the reason the fugue is considered a standard for demonstrating theory/composing skill is because it is very process oriented. Fugue is often described as a process rather than a form. The standard definition of form is essential about the layout of keys and to a lesser extent themes. The hallmark of sonata form is the 'second theme group' usually ...


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