7

Composers of the past few centuries have settled on a compromise: they tended to use staff paper with five-line staves already written in, like so: They then wrote in everything else with pencil: key signatures, time signatures, accidentals, pitches, etc. This way, any erasing they did preserved the staff lines. Although, in my experience with manuscript ...


5

There is, thankfully! This answer assumes MuseScore 2 or higher. (It may also work on MuseScore 1, but I can't verify that.) Find the group of pitches where you want to add the optional lower octave. Select the entire group of pitches by clicking on the first pitch and Shift+Click-ing on the final pitch; the group of pitches should now be boxed in blue. ...


4

It is not possible for a software program to identify harmony mistakes because it can't know what you want to do. A "mistake" is what sounds wrong to you. In other words, you need to be able to identify your own mistakes. Some composers want more dissonance, some less. What you can do is get a software program so you can input your ideas and then listen ...


3

I agree with Richard's way, but there is another way. I myself very often do this, be it for orchestration or to add an octave variation to a theme. Here is what I do to add an octave below an existing melody or bass line: Click first note and Shift + Click last note of desired selection, rests at the end of the selection don't need to be in there because ...


3

This is a bit of an addition to Richard's answer: I do compose semi-regularly, and when I do that, I often handwrite the music first. So you may find my procedure useful. I write into music notebooks (= notebooks with pre-printed staves, a bit like what Richard shows). These should be easy to buy, as well as individual sheets of paper, if you don't like ...


2

You can prepare the sheet with the staffs, names of instruments ore voices, clefs, key signs (and even the measure lines), then you make a copy of the empty original sheet (grand staff for piano or full score for band or orchestra). I did so when I wrote for brass bands or a quartet by hand. I never started with a pen, there were too many corrections. Only ...


2

There are various opinions about this. The "ultra-orthodox" view is that dotted rests are not even a thing. They don't exist. So you can't use them anywhere! The fact that people write music using them (and computer music notation software permits them) just demonstrates that many people don't know (or don't care) what they are doing. But you don't need to ...


2

Although what Heather states is true, music notation software can usually check for some correctness. The most basic check I can recall is for parallel fifths and octaves. Depending on which notation software you use, you may need to install some extra plugin to get that functionality. Hope this helps!


1

You somehow missed the Paganini Étude No. 4 by Liszt, which is a one-staff transcription of the Paganini Caprice No. 1. Enough additional notes are placed so some sections have to be played with both hands.


1

Yes; rests aren't any different from notes here. There are situations where a dotted quarter is preferred; there are situations where a quarter + an eighth (or the other way around) is the more natural notation. I don't have a concrete example from existing music, but consider the following example, a 6/8 time signature, where the rhythm is such that (most) ...


1

I'd suggest using manuscript paper marked with pre-printed musical staves. Or you can buy a five-nibbed pen for drawing your own staves. If you're reasonably confident about the bar lengths then you can prepare the page by drawing in the vertical barlines in black pen. That way you're less likely to run out of space at the right-hand end of the stave. ...


1

It is not true that the key of a song has to be the same as the starting (or ending) chord. This may be common in some styles of music, and may be a good starting point for teaching music theory and composition (since you have to start somewhere, and there are a lot of rules, and the rules are meant to be broken). At first glance I would also not be ...


1

What is the purpose of identifying the key? If you are writing it out and need a key signature, pick the one that matches the notes used most frequently. If you have mostly unaltered notes, and only a few accidentals here and there, use a key signature with no sharps or flats ("C"). If not, use one that matches the altered notes most used. If you are not ...


1

As user5747140 answered, some prose is required to explain whichever notation you choose. Messing around with the damper pedal won't damage anything. The dampers individually move extremely quickly. The pedal mechanism normally goes for years without needing professional adjustment. You could rig up a robot to "snap" the damper pedal every second for ...


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