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There are a few different reasons that might be given to follow counterpoint "rules." Stylistic emulation. While this tends to be less valued today by some, for the past few centuries, beginning composers (and teachers of composition) often valued the study of imitating classical composers that they admire. If you want to learn to compose like Palestrina ...


11

There are two basic paths leading to the goal of writing "music that works". And they are the same basic parts that lead to being able to cook food that other people can eat without complaining too much about it. The easy way is to learn a set of "tricks" that work pretty well, and practice them until you can use them successfully without much thought. ...


11

When you say "counterpoint rules" I immediately think "Fux" and species counterpoint. Species counterpoint is a teaching method. One of the goals is for the student to demonstrate an understanding of the musical elements and the discipline to follow the rules. If you have the understanding and control, writing in the species shouldn't be a problem. After ...


9

If there are multiple valid interpretations of a piece of music, but the composer of the music states that only one of those interpretations is what they intended, are other interpretations still valid? This concern is known in literary theory as the intentional fallacy, though some people have discussed it in reference to music as well. The "fallacy"...


3

Your melody isn't too elaborate to be the theme in a theme and variations. Take the theme of Paganini's Caprice No. 24, for example. (OK, I took this picture from Wikipedia, but my point still stands.) This is the theme for an infamous theme and variations you've probably already heard before. It's fast, it's filled with 16th notes, it's got loads of ...


3

I think Pensato and Melodic Expectation may indeed be what you're looking for. Maybe also look into Ghost Notes (although they are more muted notes so they are "actually there"). The idea behind the missing notes, I think, is to - after the melody has been established - engage the brain of the listener even more by having it fill in the blanks and maybe ...


3

There is nothing unusual happening in the strings, unless you regard staccato as a special technique. String players have a number of different ways of playing staccato but it's normally their choice which one they'll use for a particular phrase.


3

An amorphous question, but interesting. In the case of harmonic analysis, the more correct interpretation would be the one that more accurately reflects the chord's function. The function is usually made clear by its resolution. Take a fully diminished 7th chord, for example. Heard in isolation, or seen as a set of pitch classes, it is impossible to know ...


3

Modal mixture versus tritone substitution seems to be about harmonic analysis. That is fairly specific compared to meaning of..., significance, interpretation. I would expect at a minimum that a harmonic analysis should be fulfilled in some way by the music. For example, if someone labels a chord a tritone substitution, there should be some kind of ...


3

This question is probably too subjective in its nature than what SE is looking for but here are my thoughts: The music is what the music is and we don't get to decide what is "correct". Theory is a framework used to analyze music and find ways of describing what is happening. In most situations, there is a fairly standard way of interpreting things, which ...


2

A "theme and variations" is typically just that -- a theme, and then variations on that theme. If you have multiple other sections (B, C, bridge) that have no clear relationship as a variation on that theme, then it wouldn't typically be a theme and variations. That's not to say that modern "theme and variations" don't take more liberties with the form. ...


2

The answer by "guest" is perhaps a bit extreme, but it does have a bit of a point. Music needs to be composed such that it flows together in time, and I think the view of "thematic" sections vs. "transition" sections tends to create a false sense of prioritization, as if the "theme" sections are primary and the "transitions" just "fill in" between them or ...


1

One of everything, between the staves. (waffle to reach 30 characters)


1

1) You shouldn't use multiple decrescendos so use just the one, but if that looks awkward because 4 measures is wide use staff text decresc. after the fortisimo. 2) Sforzando is an accent, not a dynamic mark, so put it on both hands' notes. 3) Yes do this. Consider using staff text cresc. instead of a 4 measure crescendo.


1

Ableton Live has quite nicely working audio-to-MIDI facilities, for melody-to-MIDI, harmony-to-MIDI and drums-to-MIDI. Check out examples from Youtube. And there are separate plugin products like MIDI Guitar 2, which is incredibly good. And if you want to write songs, why not record your acoustic piano as an acoustic piano? Many song writers record their ...


1

I’ve already several times cited D. De la Motte’s foreword to his Harmonielehre. Now I’ve found the English translation and I will poste some longer passages and then write a summary. First a link: https://www.scribd.com/document/325180105/Diether-de-La-Motte-The-Study-of-Harmony ... the later chapters focus on the innovations of specific composers and ...


1

Like all rules, from the 'rule of thirds' in pictorial composition to the Ten Commandments, they lay down a framework for reliable results in an environment where there are SO many ways to mess up! Then you start finding the exceptions... :-)


1

It all starts with connecting the dots. One simple way that you could adopt is by looking at both part A and part B that you are trying to connect; then use any of the common turnarounds - ii-V-I or I-IV-V - to move from the last chord of part A leading to the beginning of part B. You could also use passing tones, chromatic notes to connect the two parts. ...


1

Most of B themes carry within some information about A; if not, even with smooth transition and/or many structural directions taken, they will sound unrelated. You should "glue" musical stuff the same way you compose them: with meaning. There must be a "why", at least only in your heart.


1

While I wouldn't call it a Rondo That Is Also A Theme And Variations at this point, you can easily write a rondo where every return of the A section is varied. The 4th movement of Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 3 in B Minor is one such example (heck, the first return of its A section is in E minor instead of B minor, and the movement has aspects of sonata-rondo ...


1

If it's a pop video, the music keeps a steady tempo (probably), and the video is cut to fit it. But when it's the other way round - you scoring to existing video - it's quite likely you won't be able to find one tempo that puts a beat on each hit. But musical hits don't have to be on the beat. If you feel the action needs a rock groove behind it for a bit,...


1

Well, it comes down to basic math. If you have a gap between two events of T seconds, and you want to score so that there are B beats between those two events : 1 beat = T/B seconds BPM = 60 / (T/B) = 60 B / T for example : you have 6s between two events and you want 8 beats between them, then BPM = 60 x 8 / 6 = 80bpm. But when you have a bunch of ...


1

There's no straight forward answer and there's no formula - otherwise robots will write chart-topping songs for humans based on some algorithm. Some melodies sound so "good" and timeless as if they were from creation. Other melodies are just sweet for a moment but disposable with time like bumblegum. Most modern day music is like that. As a pointer or ...


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