5

I would say that E minor seems to be the clear prevailing tonality in this example. You have B chords going to Em chords, and that's quite common in minor (theorists call it harmonic minor when they raise the seventh note to the leading tone). Every note in the chords you wrote actually fits into E harmonic minor. Even the C minor chords have that E♭ = D♯ ...


5

There is a study of the subject here: https://www.gmth.de/zeitschrift/artikel/513.aspx There are also others. Some are used to build Markov chains for music simulation. Quinn's work referenced supra are a bit detailed. Just looking at major and minor triads, the split is about 63% root position and 32% first inversion and 5% second inversion.


3

I'd look up under the doctrine of the affections in music. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctrine_of_the_affections Below you have the literature and bibliography of this theme. The book you are looking for could be the one cited of Mattheson or Mersenne. Mattheson: Capellmeister In der Capellmeister by Mattheson look for “Affecten” and “Modulation”. ...


3

As noted in comments, it's impossible to know this without hearing John Williams's thoughts on the matter. My sense, based on just the evidence of the music, is no. First off, note that the "citation" is actually not just from The Penitent Man Will Pass, but is actually the "Grail theme" of the entire movie which occurs numerous times at references to the ...


2

Here are three possibilities. I think I'd rather read B. The LH should really keep the same notation it's had from the beginning.


2

There could be a thing as secondary subdominants, but we can also explain this particular progression a bit more simply: we talk about V–I resolutions creating a large descending circle-of-fifths progression. G–C–F–B♭, for instance, is one such descending circle of fifths. But here, we're going in the opposite direction: B♭–F–C–G! As such, this is ...


2

Augmented chords are good for key changes, as one set of notes can represent more than one augmented chord. Take C+. C E G♯. That's the same harmony as E+, E G♯ B♯. That's the same harmony as A♭+, A♭ C E. Three for the price of one! Diminished chords get used in the same sort of way, too. Co, C E♭ G♭ B♭♭ ...


2

Without knowing the voice leading, rhythm, or anything about phrasing it's hard to say what will "work." Em -> B7 -> B+ -> Cm -> B°7 -> Cm The whole point of this seems to be leaving off the cadence in E minor and then chromatically shifting around to C minor. Omitting the Cm in the middle seems to help make that clearer. Em B7/D# B7#5/D# B°7/D Cm That'...


2

I wouldn't try to explain it with anything fancy, the G major is the only small surprise there, bringing D Dorian taste, as opposed to, say, a Gm or Dm chord. If the chords were just Bb - F - C - Dm, I guess you wouldn't feel a need for any sort of analysis? I think the G major is the "money chord" there, bringing some recognizable character to the harmony. ...


2

In my experience I would say the high level categories are: Who will be performing it, as in the musicians themselves, their ability and any personal preferences. What instruments are used, which has already been mentioned. Obviously certain keys are easier on certain instruments. The character of the key so that it matches with the character of the piece, ...


2

Some keys are easier for some instruments. Wind instruments are generally more comfortable to play in flat keys while strings tend to be more comfortable in sharp keys. There's one orchestral piece (I forget what, but someone will doubtless say in the comments) where the composer made a point of picking a key where G, D, A and E are all sharped so that the ...


1

Here are some options. The definitions of these terms seem to overlap a lot. I don't know the nuances: con dolore: with sorrow. dolente: doleful, sorrowful. dolore: grief. doloroso: sorrowful. lacrimoso or lagrimoso: tearfully, sadly. lamentando or lamentoso: lamenting, mournfully. lugubre: lugubrious, mournful. malinconico: melancholic mesto: ...


1

Richard's answer already points out the possibility of a harmonic sequence. I just want to elaborate on that a bit. As you pointed out roots by descending fifth are the well known circle of fifths progression. As a two chord gesture it starts like this... ...if you sequence that down a step, you get the beginning of the circle, but also notice that each ...


1

@Richard gave a fulfilling answer; Another approach you can take is that, after a listen to this intro, you can hear that they play Bb and C chords in the second inversion. So, there is a triad 'sliding' into third and fifth of F and G chords from the top. To me it feels more like a IV - I movement, so it sounds more like two plagal cadences, one after ...


1

This works well, to my ear. Using Em -> B7 -> B+ -> Cm as your modulation, and then resolving a cadence, whether it is G7 -> C or B°7 -> Cm, is a great way to do this modulation. An augmented chord has an unsettled feel to it that "wants" to resolve. A common way for it to resolve, as you have found is for the root to move by a half-step to create a minor ...


1

There are no C chords in the first four bars. What you have is a single F chord, plus some non-chord tones including the Gs in the left hand. To repeat the old, old advice, stop looking at the notes on the staves and LISTEN to what you wrote! Your first four bars sound perfectly fine, but your analysis of them is misguided. In fact when you do attempt to ...


1

In the Key of F min C is the V. If you are trying to create a resolution (you'd be in harmonic or melodic at this point) then you'd want to use the C maj, or more appropriately C7. Otherwise moving to C minor in the key of F min is fine. You wrote it so you must make that decision. If you are avoiding the E, Eb in the first 4 bars I'd look at the melody. ...


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