4

The "metrical subdivisions" he's speaking of are whole measures. He's saying that phrases usually cross barlines and end mid-measure.


2

...Are metrical subdivisions each beat of a measure? That is my understanding of the text. But the wording is really awkward. The only thing crossed would be barlines. I supposed you can say a dividing line between beats is crossed, but that would be true of anything longer than one beat! Something like "phrases may start or end with incomplete ...


2

I would rather analyse the progression in G♯-minor, not B-major. Then it's ⅰ5 - Ⅵ | Ⅶsus9-Ⅶsus4 - ⅴ-Ⅴ/7add4 This is quite similar to ⅰ - Ⅵ | Ⅶ - Ⅴ7 which I'd consider a bit of a film-music-cliché progression. Omitting the minor tonic's third is common for getting a minor key's dramatic properties without bringing in the melancholy ones. The Ⅶ, which ...


1

If the piece is a vocal, the stress pattern of the lyrics generally indicates the rhythm. There some options as to the number of unstressed syllables between stressed syllables. For example, dactyls can be represented by a long note and two short or an accented note and two unaccented or something similar. A choice may be chosen based on tradition (makes ...


1

It totally depends on the mood you're going for, and honestly I'd say deciding a time signature, a key, a melody, and a concept are all things that are a part of your decision when composing a piece of your own and there shouldn't really be an answer. That being said, here's my personal tip: start with trying to find a basic melody, or at least a subject / ...


1

To someone who's proficient at playing full chordal accompaniment by ear and creating backing chord progressions for melodies, chord changes can be improvised. Melodic lines, rhythms, lyrics, dance moves, etc. all aspects of music can be improvised. All degrees of freedom are open, and any order of process steps, or a mixture of them, is possible. Maybe ...


1

There are many eras and styles of country music, and each has characteristic rhythms, instrumentation and techniques. The Origin: Ralph Peer goes to Bristol, TN, to record local musicians, including Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family. Instrumentation is acoustic instruments, like acoustic guitar, autoharp, and fiddle (books have been written about old-time ...


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