6

I like to think one can compose music, songs, jingles, etc. without "formal" training, but ... There is so much to each of the arts that it takes a mysterious and marvelous mental and emotional facilities to produce a decent creation (that has anything extra above the commonplace work) in any art. This includes music. There is always a possibility ...


5

The ♭VII chord is a very common dominant substitute, especially in popular music. It's relatively uncommon in the 18th century, but starting around the time of Dvorak or so we start to encounter it more often. (Perhaps it's not completely unrelated that Dvorak liked incorporating popular music of the day into his compositions.) As such, your progression is ...


3

I agree with Gary and would just add that for me, as a composer, the most fantastic thing about music college was having an orchestra you were encouraged to write for. Mixing with other musicians was important too: finding out what's possible on a harp, which trills are best avoided on bassoons and why you should never smile encouragingly at the brass. ...


3

A lot of things are going on in the song! The verse is in A minor, it starts with a simple Am/E vamp. Then it plays Dm/ Bb/D / C / G. The only "strange" chord is Bb/D, Bb in first inversion that is. It is the bII chord of the A minor scale and is called the neapolitan chord. It creates a very beautiful sound, because it encloses the A note between ...


3

I would advise you to start drinking heavily. I wouldn't bother with inspiration. Deadlines are more useful. Ideas come if they have to. Give yourself deadlines. What type of songs do you want to write? [Let's leave "compose" out of it for the time being.] How many types of song do you know? Do you want your songs to be unusual ones or the usual ...


2

I hope I understand your question correctly ... Practically every bass melody can be used and composed as canon. Many canons are built by a) bass line and 2 or 3 upper parts like this canon: Finally the canon is just a linear row of the chained voices: Dona nobis pacem: Alleluja: If you have a cadence I IV V I or the progression I vi ii V you’re already ...


2

I'm going to disagree with a lot of the existing answers: On a string instrument, there are some note patterns that can't be played - at least not neatly or quickly. Double stops - playing two notes at once - have been mentioned; It's not possible to simultaneously play more than one note on the same string (although you can usually use different strings ...


2

I think you will find lots of information by reading about poetry and meter. Scansion is the "scanning" of a line of text to determine its meter. That is probably an important thing for you to look into. The basic idea is poetry (lyrics) can be written to fit into regular metrical patterns like iambic which is short/long or weak/strong. There are ...


2

Using a simple chord E7 works well. Being a little more subtle, you could use Bm7 or Bm7♭5 before E7, then on to Am.


2

I hear the Db chord as part of a modulation, the IV chord of Ab major. Going back two bars, to the Eb chord, that functions as a pivot chord: I in the original key of Eb and V in the modulation key of Ab. The subsequent Ab then is I, Db is IV, and Eb is now established in my ear as V. You then reestablish the key of Eb with the subsequent chord progression. ...


2

There is no rule on music composition. All rules are made to be broken. Songwriting is a Decision Making process. You create, you listen, you like it/deslike it then keep it or change it. There are many songwriting thecniques and approaches. The more you try, the more you learn what works for you. I advise reading 101 Songwriting Wrongs And How To Right Them,...


2

What you can't do is follow a chord progression that someone suggests! There are millions of songs out there already, and millions of chord progressions to match them. Until you listen to 'Axis of Awesome'... Just about any chord could follow any other chord to become a sequence, so that's not a bad place to start. A lot of songs have started thus, and ...


1

Ever since the Beatles ♭VII has been a frequent visitor in popular music. Sometimes it's acting as IV of IV (Get Back). But very often it just exists on its own terms. It's become an Honorary Diatonic Chord. Accept this and move on. Not everything is tonic, subdominant or dominant. Not everything is Cycle of Fifths. Insisting on forcing ♭VII into ...


1

I suspect that this question might not met the standards of stack exchange in that it would be opinion based. That being said, I looked back at my reading diary (http://don.dream-in-color.net/books/archive.php4?iSubject=83 ) to see what I'd read and thought about books on counterpoint. I started with Counterpoint: The Polyphonic Style of the Sixteenth ...


1

The solution to your problem is quite simple. The reason is: When you play the clashing tones you are concentrated on this clashing sound and you try to avoid this clash like you describe it, but then you aren‘t satisfied anymore about the arpeggios and the chord sound. Good music is living from consonances and dissonances. Don‘t care about the rules of ...


1

I'm not sure this is what you are looking for, but it might help get to the point about determining the potential for canon, or you might say understanding the rule for a canon. This video is where I first learned about a "rule" for canon at the fifth... I also found this article that gets into the same idea in ...


1

The general answer To start, it's worth making a distinction between a tone center and a pitch center. I infer from your use of "tone center" that you're looking for a "tonic" pitch -- that is, "what key/mode am I in?" Nevertheless, one way to attempt to figure out the key and mode is simply to take each unique pitch in your ...


1

Something like below may suffice. You're going from C minor to G major. You want to cancel the flats. Bar 10 is a transition or bridge to G major. It's in modulation. B11 creating some rhythmic momentum as there has been before, without this momentum will sound too dead. B13 creates an authentic cadence where the modulation to G is very solid.Clef change to ...


1

The First Problem: This might just be a notation issue. It's somewhat unclear what is intended by the triplet marking under the group of blue notes. As written, the problem is that since our ears are attuned the preceding A-flats, the sudden appearance of A-natural creates a natural accent. By itself that's not an issue, but it comes in an especially weak ...


1

Try to listen to Hungarian rhapsody 6. It has both c# and d flat


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