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Two leading music scholars of our generation, Jim Hepokoski and Warren Darcy, formulated what they call Sonata Theory (note the capital S and T!) to better understand the sonata process. They list five types of sonatas. The Type 3 Sonata is the sonata that you describe, with exposition, development, and recapitulation. The Type 1 Sonata, however, is a ...


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some people only know Dvorak's 9th. And when they hear a film soundtrack with orchestra sound and timpani they are reminded of this symphony. As my students always said when I was demonstrating how Renaissance music would sound: but this is music for christmas... as they had no other concept of this style. If you want that I don't have to listen the whole ...


5

It's not uncommon for melodies to include notes that aren't in the chord, especially on weak beats of the bar. The article linked is not really a good way to understand popular music or jazz music (and my common practice music theory isn't really good enough to give an appraisal of it's usefulness to analyse classical music in an explanatory way). The ...


3

A sonata that has only the exposition and the recapitulation or only a very short development section can be called a sonatina. Early sonata forms from the transition between the Baroque and Classical periods can be based on a two part form. Essentially the material of the first half will move from the tonic key to the dominant key. Then the second half ...


3

The term Sonata can be used for any instrumental piece. The Sonata that you're thinking of is the classical Sonatensatz and needs to have these 3 section to be called as such. The classical Sonata includes apart of the Sonata-Satz form a Menuet or Scherzo and other forms like Adagio-Satz, Lied-Satz, (AB: a form made up of two contrasting sections, each of ...


3

I'm wondering if chords usually move down by fifths. A ponderous question. It is simple in presentation but difficult to answer depending on the OP's background. In order to properly answer this question it needs to be properly unpacked: First, I take it that the OP intends to ask if chord roots usually move by fifths. Supposing this is true, we need to ...


3

There is a perfect fit for this chord: CM7b9 with interval set 0,1,4,7,11 Double Harmonic: C Db E F G Ab B chord: C Db E G B There is one inversion without clashing note functions GM6b5add11 with interval set 0,4,5,6,9 Asian (5th mode of Double Harmonic): G Ab B C Db E F chord: G B C Db E


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"Usually" is arguable. Not every chord progression is downwards by fifths only, but there is something to be said for that sound of a descending fifth. Lots of common chord movements do follow this pattern. The ii-V-I, ubiquitous in jazz music, is two consecutive root movements down by a fifth. In general, resolutions downward by a fifth seem more final ...


2

Do chord progressions usually move by fifths? No. I think you are overlooking an important part of that flow chart: the curved arrow to the right of I means "the tonic chord can move to any other chord." So, that results in a super common progression I ii6. The rest of the flow chart does display descending fifth progressions with some options variations ...


2

There are two melodic clauses - probably the most usual: soso lati dododo (and its minor relative: mi fi si la sofa mire do ... ( miredoti la) Both are leading a fourth up or fifth down. also the usual bass-line that goes do re mi do, fa so la fa or so la ti so, do re mi do etc. They are developed by counterpoint as well they are basic for harmonic ...


2

Yesterday a young American choral director said that the difference between ¨rallentando¨ and ¨ritardando¨ was that the first implies a diminishing of the volume as well as a slowing down of the tempo. I kept myself back from telling him that he was wrong, that I'm fluent in Italian and lived 20 years in Italy, that I've sung with prominent conductors (e.g. ...


2

There are some goofy, sprawling answers here. I’ll give you some bullets of the things I myself find most helpful in developing my craft: 1.) Write music every day. Doesn’t matter if it’s good or not, you just have to do it. 2.) Get outside your listening comfort zone: listen to unfamiliar music, find cool sounds or new ways of thinking, put them into your ...


2

Only if the singers can sing the parts. My main argument would be the range. The range of the violin is way wider than that of the average soprano; thus, if the violin part goes on a really high note, a soprano might not be able to reach that one. There are many things that can easily be played by a string instrument that can't be sung. So, some string ...


2

Generally, the chords are not spread over the sections as you describe in your question. What arrangers do is use the 3 sections (sax, trombone, trumpet) as 3, well... sections, which have their own part in the melody of the tune (sometimes the trombones and trumpet will be merged in one brass section, as per need). The goal is that each section is self ...


1

This passage of music is more modal than tonal. What this means is that the harmony is directional. Traditionally, tonal music travels from tonic to dominant and back. This section of four chords repeated is harmonically static. For instance, tonal music will often use a major V chord even in minor, but this piece uses the minor v chord, which doesn't have ...


1

Yes, you can. Samuel Barber did this with his famous Adagio for Strings, which itself is a string orchestra arrangement of a movement from his String Quartet, resulting in his (standalone) Agnus Dei. As Shevliaskovic notes in another answer, and indeed you acknowledge in your question by saying "transpose as needed," there will usually be some adaptation ...


1

Okay, there is a lot to unpack here. Let's take it step by step: One of the main problems with computers is that it is difficult to achieve a flow of writing. First, I'd like to signal that this statement is projection. Many composers (including myself) work best / fastest with computers. I find writing by hand to be tedious because when I write, I know ...


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Try researching those great masters to get more than anecdotes. You can find books on composer's methods like https://books.google.com/books?id=zaZ8mAysMeUC, in a university music library you can also find complete scores for great composers and these sometimes include transcriptions from sketchbooks, also you can find some sketchbook autograph images ...


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You can have a fugue in 3 or 4 voice while keeping the widest interval for each hand to an octave or less. Pachelbel, Magnificant, Primi Toni Unless I missed something the whole fugue does not go beyond an octave in either hand. The texture is mostly 3 voice and a full 4 in some places. Bach, WTC I, Fugue XI The part boxed in red presents a trouble spot ...


1

I'd like to say that your scheme will help you avoid parallel octaves in your 4-voice solo piano contrapuntal works, and intuitively, it should (at least IMO), but I cannot guarantee that you will not continuously trigger parallel octaves at 3-voice works. 3-voice works fall prey to many of the same triggers for parallel octaves as 4-voice works (assuming ...


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It would help if you explain a bit about the notation you provided. Where did it come from what exactly is it transcribing from the song? There aren't any lyrics, it it an instrumental part? Etc, etc, etc. Why make us guess at all these points? I assume this is your transcription of the main melody sans lyrics. If that is the case, one point up front: I don'...


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The vast majority of chord progressions in the classical theory move, four forward, one forward or three steps back. That is the easiest and best way to move between chords.


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THIS IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND MAY CONTAIN FACTUAL ERRORS WITH RESPECT TO THE LAW. PLEASE CONTACT A LAWYER SPECIALIZING IN COPYRIGHT FOR LEGAL ADVICE. Normally we don’t answer legal questions here but I think this one is simple enough to give basic context. Music in the public domain may be used by anyone for any purpose. Want to arrange JS Bach 24 preludes ...


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(ignoring the fact that the song's in E♭ minor) I think a better way to describe this progression is: B7 C7♯11 B7 B♭7♯11 A7 B7♯9 V7 subV7/V V7 subV7/V IV7 V7♯9 These passing chords just seem to be tritone substitutions for the dominant that slide up and down in a chromatic manner. Since 7♯11 chords are enharmonic respellings ...


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I absolutely view certain lyrics as breaking the fourth wall, just as mentioned previously. A couple of examples: "Every day's a Saturday" by Bowling for Soup: "Monday was manic / Tuesday was worse / I've gotta say Wednesday for the sake of this verse" "Life after Lisa" by Bowling for Soup: "Listening to House of Pain / Having headaches in my brain / ...


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