4

^2 and ^6 in minor [...] from what I understand, if resolved inward to scale degreees ^3 and ^5 it will sound like the mediant chord is now the new tonic. When played in isolation, perhaps, but in the context of a full realization of the harmony, I have serious misgivings about that hypothesis. For a counterexample, what about when ♮vii°7 resolves to i? I ...


3

Keep in mind that the scale degree functions change when that tritone is in the major or minor position. In major the degrees are ^7 and ^4 associated with the dominant chord, but in minor they are ^2 and ^6 associated with the subdominant. In major the ^7 would move up to ^1 like in V6 I, but that ^7 becomes ^2 in minor and it would be held when a ...


2

It's interesting you cite these two keys, B♭ and F♯, because these are famously the two keys used in the first movement of Schubert's D960 piano sonata (although he sometimes spells the second key as G♭). You may check this piece out to see what he does; once it's a direct modulation, and another time he uses an enharmonically spelled fully diminished ...


2

Yes, you can use the tritone between 2 and 6 of the natural minor scale to lead all sorts of places! As you can with any tritone. If we're in the world of functional harmony we must also consider the harmonic minor scale, which contains the same 4-7 tritone as the major scale. And (as mentioned in your other thread about the picardy 3rd) it can take the ...


1

There's no 'answer' to your question. But let me throw some ideas at you. If your second subject doesn't grow organically out of the first subject it might be the wrong one for THIS sonata. But 'sudden and abrupt' is good too. Just try to choose two themes that are in the same ballpark - that CAN follow one another in the same musical flow. (Maybe what ...


1

First harmonise the melody. Decide what chord goes with each melody note. Then stack notes below the melody using the notes of THAT chord. Big Band style will, indeed, probably use a lot of 7th, 9th and 13th chords, secondary dominants and the like. And a tonic function chord may well be spiced up with an added 9th (2nd), 6th or major 7th.


1

According to Schoenberg's comments on modulation, one needs to "neutralize" the previous key; by that, he means emphasize the notes that are different between the keys to confirm the modulation. Simple example: going from C major to G major entails making sure an F# stands out early (thus the idea of entering a new key from its dominant or at ...


1

Not that distant. If you spell it as B♭ to G♭ majors, the modulation looks a lot less violent! There's no common chord, but there's a common note, the tonic of B♭ major becomes the 3rd of G♭ major. And "chords with roots a third apart that share only one common tone and have the same quality (both are major or both are minor)" are so pleasing ...


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