New answers tagged

2

The brain is very quick to adapt to varying weights and sizes of keys. The first thing though is to have an ergonomic technique. Then the brain can make the proper adjustments to abduction, weight and elbow movement. If there are flaws in your technique your brain won't be able to overcome the differences. It is like walking barefoot, with heavy boots, in ...


1

I think it's different from person to person, depends on how opened we are, how adaptable to different things. Most people I know, doesn't have any problems switching from one to another, and even different instruments. I just bought a Roll up piano for my boyfriend's birthday gift. It has 81 tones, a little bit smaller tiles than standard piano, but with a ...


3

It will be the same as when you are climbing up 2 stairs with different degrees of steps. If the difference of the steps inside the scale are equal but different between the two stairs you'll be easily adapting the new distance when climbing the other stair. But when the distance is changing on the same stair you will stumble and struggle like a wanderer ...


6

can you switch easily between normal and mini key sizes like it was two different instruments, or do you feel that your playing on a real piano is badly impacted with the bad habits you constructed playing on the mini keyboard? I haven't noticed anything bad caused by playing mini keyboards. Mini keys are a little awkward to play, so I won't try to play any ...


2

It appears that there is no definitively correct answer, with various sources indicating different approaches. So I submit the following argument for the use of accidentals for D Dorian, G mixolydian etc. as pure opinion with no claim to authority. The most important information to immediately glean from a key signature, it would seem to me, would be tonal ...


4

In short, definitely not. For several reasons: Human speech is more often weakly pitched or unpitched, and when it is pitched, the pitches or partial pitches do not progress in a musical way, but instead in a way that serves speech. Music that followed verbal pitch patterns (at least those of English speakers) would be very jarring. As noted elsewhere, even ...


9

Human speech (including dialogue in movies) has a certain pitch. Well, this is true MOST of the time. As counterexamples, whispers wouldn't have defined pitch, and neither would certain other ways to vocalize dialogue (vocal fry in a delivery tends to obscure the fundamental, for example). Breathing sounds like sighs don't have strong observable ...


4

It's an interesting thesis, but I don't think that vocal pitching in speech is either harmonic or melodic. In short-- I don't think it will really be a very meaningful matchup That being said, I can think of two examples where a movie tried to coordinate speaking and singing explicitly. The first is from the movie Amadeus, which is an absolute MUST watch ...


6

This is a little hard to answer, because Hindemith was (somewhat famously) idiosyncratic, inconsistent, and unclear with his own theories and analyses. But I’ll answer the best I can. Throughout this answer, I’ll reference three texts in addition to Hindemith’s own Craft of Musical Composition (Unterweising im Tonsatz): The Music of Paul Hindemith by David ...


4

When the motif is sequenced in mm. 3-4 the joinings result in a descent of a fifth between beats... ...one way to explain the countersubject descending a fifth instead of ascending a fourth in m. 5 is it reflects the descending fifths of the preceeding sequential line. For the dotted rhythm you can look at it like this... ...the main motif starts with an ...


1

(As mentioned in other answers) the triplet sounds like a smooth 3-beat bar; because it's written as a triplet (rather than as a 3/4 measure with a slightly slower tempo), this structure is useful as a contrast to a piece written in 4/4 with a 4-beat bar (or 2-2 with a 2-beat bar.) The other measure sounds more like a 3+3+2 additive measure than a division ...


13

Beyond the obvious - the two rhythms are different - it helps to have some context on the history and use of the second rhythm. The second rhythm is often known as the tresillo and is historically popular in Latin American (particularly Cuban) music. It is however African in origin, having been bought to the Americas by slaves. More recently the tresillo has ...


1

Based on your comment (Bosendorfer piano, Yamaha silent system), if you record your piano from the headphone jack you will not be recording your actual piano sound but a digital piano sample (although I’m sure a very good one) that Yamaha has built into its silent piano. This question is borderline off topic (gear recommendation) but I will try and provide ...


9

I don't know why we're getting such complicated answers/comments to this simple question. The triplet is a smooth rhythm with three equal notes. The other is a more jerky, syncopated rhythm. They're not just different 'in theory'. They're similar but different, period. Like apples and oranges are both round fruits, but they're DIFFERENT round fruits. ...


7

I'm confused by some answers. These are different rhythms entirely. Triplets have three evenly-played notes, and two dotted eighths + 1 eigth = 3 + 3 + 2 beats. I'd use the first if I wanted 3 identical notes. I'd use the second if I wanted a more syncopated feeling.


-1

The difference is: they are not the same at all, like you say in the triplets the length values are equal while the dotted example the 2 first notes are longer than the third! When apply the different notations? In my ear I hear two different stiles: The triplets I’d use to indicate for a legato or tenuto interpretation, extending to rubato in a slower ...


17

The following are the exact same rhythms you posted, but each one is divided into smaller values and they are placed on top of each other to make the comparison easier. As you can easily see, the two notes you said don't fall at the same beat. They are slightly off. This is because in the case of the triplets, you divide the beat by 3 (and play the first ...


7

Maestro, many cities have societies for composers, such as the Melbourne Composers' League, which have links with performers who are interested in performing new music. If I were a composer I'd look for a group near where I live. In New Zealand there is an annual Composers Workshop, which has performers "on tap".


18

A few avenues you could pursue: There are many competitions for composers, and these are a primary way to gain recognition. Prizes can include monetary award, performances of the piece, and/or commissions for future work. Competitions are sponsored by local, national, and international organizations. A basic internet search will give you an abundance of ...


4

There are two especially important implications of Bach's choices here: The lower D in the right hand (labeled [1]), serves to provide a continuation of the stepwise motion initiated in the previous measure's left hand. Harmonically, the C is being transferred to the right hand (beat 2) for resolution downward to B (beat 3). The dotted C is because Bach ...


2

Seems to me tha verse has actually gone into key E. There are A and Am, both of which are commonplace in key E, and using Bm instead of E7 is a not unusual way to get to IV, A. The Bm has B, D, F♯, so sounds somewhat like E9. On the 2nd question - modes will and do appear in some songs, although nowhere near as common as the 'main' modes of Ionian and ...


0

This has been discussed since the 1200s without coming to a unanimous conclusion. In practice, the minimum rather than the breve seems to be the main pulse note. I have read various places that the big revolution (really a 200 year or so evolution) was the improvement in musical notation. As notation became able to show more complex rhythms and pitches, the ...


-1

I recommend looking at music as an alternation between the influences of Apollo and Dionysus (look up this term, it's very important in the arts). Apollo is the sun god, and the god of music. In art, Apollo represents formalism, intellect, and artifice. Apollo represents GREEK ideals. Dionysus is the god of wine, and of nature. In art, Dionysus represents ...


2

This is a potentially broad question but I think a good answer can be summarized in a reasonable amount of text. Any of the traditional dimensions of music can be used to evoke imagery, and it could be argued that essential all music is more or less evocative of images. That said, some pieces (Pictures at an Exhibition comes to mind) seem to be particularly ...


3

Start by copying more than emulating. For example, do a thorough chord analysis of a piece you want to emulate, come up with your own subjects/motives/themes that are the same length and character as the piece you are going to almost-copy, then develop your new material following the exact same chord progression as the original. Make your almost-copy the ...


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