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According to Schoenberg's comments on modulation, one needs to "neutralize" the previous key; by that, he means emphasize the notes that are different between the keys to confirm the modulation. Simple example: going from C major to G major entails making sure an F# stands out early (thus the idea of entering a new key from its dominant or at ...


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There's no 'answer' to your question. But let me throw some ideas at you. If your second subject doesn't grow organically out of the first subject it might be the wrong one for THIS sonata. But 'sudden and abrupt' is good too. Just try to choose two themes that are in the same ballpark - that CAN follow one another in the same musical flow. (Maybe what ...


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First harmonise the melody. Decide what chord goes with each melody note. Then stack notes below the melody using the notes of THAT chord. Big Band style will, indeed, probably use a lot of 7th, 9th and 13th chords, secondary dominants and the like. And a tonic function chord may well be spiced up with an added 9th (2nd), 6th or major 7th.


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Not that distant. If you spell it as B♭ to G♭ majors, the modulation looks a lot less violent! There's no common chord, but there's a common note, the tonic of B♭ major becomes the 3rd of G♭ major. And "chords with roots a third apart that share only one common tone and have the same quality (both are major or both are minor)" are so pleasing ...


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Gb (=F#) is the lower mediant key to Bb and is often used without any modulation: bVI -> I. bVI becomes the tonic of the new section.


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It's interesting you cite these two keys, B♭ and F♯, because these are famously the two keys used in the first movement of Schubert's D960 piano sonata (although he sometimes spells the second key as G♭). You may check this piece out to see what he does; once it's a direct modulation, and another time he uses an enharmonically spelled fully diminished ...


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Keep in mind that the scale degree functions change when that tritone is in the major or minor position. In major the degrees are ^7 and ^4 associated with the dominant chord, but in minor they are ^2 and ^6 associated with the subdominant. In major the ^7 would move up to ^1 like in V6 I, but that ^7 becomes ^2 in minor and it would be held when a ...


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Yes, you can use the tritone between 2 and 6 of the natural minor scale to lead all sorts of places! As you can with any tritone. If we're in the world of functional harmony we must also consider the harmonic minor scale, which contains the same 4-7 tritone as the major scale. And (as mentioned in your other thread about the picardy 3rd) it can take the ...


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^2 and ^6 in minor [...] from what I understand, if resolved inward to scale degreees ^3 and ^5 it will sound like the mediant chord is now the new tonic. When played in isolation, perhaps, but in the context of a full realization of the harmony, I have serious misgivings about that hypothesis. For a counterexample, what about when ♮vii°7 resolves to i? I ...


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Tritones and diminished 7th chords have this in common-- they divide the octave equally. Composers VERY often use this fact to do just what you're talking about-- for example modulating to A major instead of resolving to E-flat or c minor. A nice way to move forward might be something like this: C minor--> d + a-flat (=g#) --> A major --> d minor --...


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The question seems to be about two different things. The title question says, "Is partimento a good way to learn how to write a trio sonata in the style of Corelli?" Sure, if you want to learn how to imitate the specific style of that particular period, using historical pedagogical methods is probably the best approach, though you'd likely need a ...


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It makes sense to learn partimento since it is the method which Corelli used to write his sonatas. I have half a year to develop my partimento skills (following the steps from Dr John Mortensen ).While it will be a slow process, it will be the best method to being able to compose in the style of Corelli's trio sonatas.


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Partimenti are a perfectly fine way to learn Corelli's style, but not as good a way to learn "counterpoint and harmony for classical music generally." Counterpoint and harmony teaching has advanced somewhat since the 1700s. Partimenti might be a fun project, and it might teach you want you want to know about counterpoint and harmony, but efficient ...


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It isn't clear what you mean by "convincingly" or "smoothly" change scales. It sounds like you're using "scale" to mean "key." The technical word for changing keys is modulation. The typical thing to do which is covered in most basic harmony textbooks is change to a related key, the dominant, subdominant, or relative. ...


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Firstly, don't conflate or confuse between scales and keys. The two are connected, but generally we write in a key, and use the scale notes basically from that key diatonically - but often other notes tend to creep in too, so it's not made from a scale any more. Several ways work and are used regularly. Moving to the key either side of the existing one in ...


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The technique is called "phasing", and is often attributed to Steve Reich, who wrote a series of phasing pieces. Two examples of Reich's phasing pieces can be found in this answer: What's “species counterpoint”? Are there any other types of counterpoint? A similar-sounding technique, but not "phasing", because it's not intended to be ...


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