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4

The arpeggio continuously plays in E minor while the chords in the progression change. Should I adapt the arpeggio on the progression? Music is art. You can do whatever you want. But, it seems clear to me you are trying understand some basic harmony concepts like combining chord tones and non-chord tone to follow a harmonic template (chord progression.) ...


3

You are allowed to do exactly what you like in music! As long as no-one gets hurt. There are many people like yourself who think there is a set of rules that must be followed. Please rid yourself of that notion. A lot of those 'rules' came about through certain things seeming to work well, but they're guidelines rather than rules. It's your music, you can do ...


7

Chord progressions don’t typically get names. There are a few exceptions like “blues” and “rhythm changes” (songs based on Gershwin’s “I Got Rhythm”) but even those can be played in a variety of different ways so even by saying “Let’s play a blues” there’s not a universal progression that you will get from different players. Sometimes musicians use numbers ...


1

Start with the KEY of C major CDEFGABC There are 3 functions that everything do do represents. These functions are based on the key center point. Tonic is low dissonance, relaxed [Home] Subdominant is medium dissonance, meaning motion or journey away from home. Dominant is high dissonance or the most motion rhe farthest away from home. So the first step ...


0

Start with a simple song of any key you feel comfortable with. Identify the tonic(I), Sub-dominant(IV) and dominant(V) of the key. These three degrees have the easiest chords. Practice the tune/melody with your right hand and note down to which degree each of the notes in the melody belong to. Then you can build patterns like this: If the note in the tune is ...


1

There are many eras and styles of country music, and each has characteristic rhythms, instrumentation and techniques. The Origin: Ralph Peer goes to Bristol, TN, to record local musicians, including Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family. Instrumentation is acoustic instruments, like acoustic guitar, autoharp, and fiddle (books have been written about old-time ...


0

Schoenberg could have said even more clearly: most phrases and motifs start with an up-beat (and have their measure crossing ending, logically).


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He's basically saying that most phrases are "irregular" or, better, they're not that round as we may think when study this set of rules; you'll see what I mean when you get on the part of period/sentence/hybrid structures. We first see these 8 bar patterns and may think "a phrase must start on downbeat measure 1 and end upbeat measure x", ...


2

...Are metrical subdivisions each beat of a measure? That is my understanding of the text. But the wording is really awkward. The only thing crossed would be barlines. I supposed you can say a dividing line between beats is crossed, but that would be true of anything longer than one beat! Something like "phrases may start or end with incomplete ...


4

The "metrical subdivisions" he's speaking of are whole measures. He's saying that phrases usually cross barlines and end mid-measure.


1

If the piece is a vocal, the stress pattern of the lyrics generally indicates the rhythm. There some options as to the number of unstressed syllables between stressed syllables. For example, dactyls can be represented by a long note and two short or an accented note and two unaccented or something similar. A choice may be chosen based on tradition (makes ...


1

It totally depends on the mood you're going for, and honestly I'd say deciding a time signature, a key, a melody, and a concept are all things that are a part of your decision when composing a piece of your own and there shouldn't really be an answer. That being said, here's my personal tip: start with trying to find a basic melody, or at least a subject / ...


2

I would rather analyse the progression in G♯-minor, not B-major. Then it's ⅰ5 - Ⅵ | Ⅶsus9-Ⅶsus4 - ⅴ-Ⅴ/7add4 This is quite similar to ⅰ - Ⅵ | Ⅶ - Ⅴ7 which I'd consider a bit of a film-music-cliché progression. Omitting the minor tonic's third is common for getting a minor key's dramatic properties without bringing in the melancholy ones. The Ⅶ, which ...


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