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3

There is, thankfully! This answer assumes MuseScore 2 or higher. (It may also work on MuseScore 1, but I can't verify that.) Find the group of pitches where you want to add the optional lower octave. Select the entire group of pitches by clicking on the first pitch and Shift+Click-ing on the final pitch; the group of pitches should now be boxed in blue. ...


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It is not true that the key of a song has to be the same as the starting (or ending) chord. This may be common in some styles of music, and may be a good starting point for teaching music theory and composition (since you have to start somewhere, and there are a lot of rules, and the rules are meant to be broken). At first glance I would also not be ...


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What is the purpose of identifying the key? If you are writing it out and need a key signature, pick the one that matches the notes used most frequently. If you have mostly unaltered notes, and only a few accidentals here and there, use a key signature with no sharps or flats ("C"). If not, use one that matches the altered notes most used. If you are not ...


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If you want to understand what a Polonaise is, Chopin is not a good place to start from. He was writing "Polish Nationalism for ex-pats in Paris", not "dance music." The Polonaise is a very simple dance. It is just a walk, with the third beat of every the bar a bit longer than the first two to make time for a slightly longer step. If you want to ...


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One characteristic of a polonaise is the use of "feminine" endings in phrases; the tonic (or cadence-ending chord) often occurs on the second beat of a measure. (I don't know the provenance of the terms masculine and feminine endings. Masculine and feminine for phrase beginnings are funny in the masculine and feminine are often used reversed; sometimes one ...


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You could try following the model of a fugue with a similar melodic pattern. After looking around I found this one from Pachelbel's Fugues on the Magnificant... ...the ending to make clear the key... The important thing is that the subject matches the same melodic series of ^5 ^3 ^4... The answer is ^1 ^7 ^1... I couldn't quickly find an example with ...


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I guess you've written your chart by now, @ahuhm! May we see what you ended up with? Here's a good resource. Followed by a possible approach to 'Wine and Roses', blatantly stealing Tom Kubis' idea :-) http://jazzarrangingclass.com/how-to-write-a-big-band-shout-chorus-part-1/


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Not a complete answer because I don't really know how to do this myself yet. But I do have a few pieces of advice. For an amateur, getting on paper (or in the computer) something which you can hear in your head is hard. In fact, my general piece of advice for someone who's only just starting out in any musical capacity who has something stuck in their head -...


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I'd like to share two different potential answers to your issue: Train perfect pitch: Even relative pitch can help you here, but the goal in this scenario would be learning the sounds of the notes closely enough to be able to transcribe a melody from your head into notes, with or without the assistance of an instrument. Don't be mistaken, this is definitely ...


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