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Since nobody has come up with anything better, my suggestion is: "A singer accompanying themself".


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The guy in the Hotel California is playing a 3 guitar song on one guitar. Try to play it, it's not easy reading. Jeff Beck does a solo guitar cover of the Beatles' entire Sergeant Pepper album. So maybe "Beck style solo guitar cover arrangement."


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Space, repeated phrases or loops, slow transitions, atonal effects, long reverberation or delay/echo times, lack of surprise, slow attack (instruments, crescendo). Ambient music can be surprisingly complex and combine different forms. However, it is the emotional and imaginative response of the listener to the sound that will define what is ambient or ...


2

I haven’t heard about Meyer’s theories before. But it seems obvious to me that all composers of Renaissance and the common practice era (if not since Josquin or earlier) - have been “playing” with these patterns and expectations. Also in composers of today do so, maybe one has heard or read about Meyer’s theory. But this might just have been a coincidence. ...


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I think variation is the term to use. Ground bass is a specific kind of variation where the bass part repeats as the melody on top changes. While that description seems apt for the track you linked, ground bass suggests Baroque music, like Bach or Handel. Some may think it an inappropriate term for that reason, this isn't 18th century music. In the track the ...


2

Sound design serves almost exactly the same purpose in electronic music that instrumentation does in orchestral music. Orchestral composers will play with elements like giving different lines to different instruments, giving instructions for articulation and dynamics, and using unique techniques like pizzicato strings or brass mutes to create a specific ...


2

Yes, whether using traditional instruments or designing your own - and any sound used in a musical composition can be considered an 'instrument' - a composer chooses a sound that suits the music. If you need a pad, don't score pizzicato strings. If you've written a sprightly melody, a slow attack isn't going to be much use. Incidentally, your timpani ...


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Apart from - don't play the notes you named! It's in 3/4, but could have been called 9/8, as there are plenty of triplets around. Looking at the stem direction, it's written in two parts for the r.h. and sort of two parts (missing rests) for l.h. As such, the top part r.h. has a minim, followed by a crotchet's worth of triplet quavers. That adds up. Stems ...


1

You have made a couple of errors here I'm afraid. You have misnamed a few of the notes. The right hand part is in the treble clef at this point I think and, if I remember correctly, its in D flat major so there is a key signature of 5 flats. Also you have referred to something as a "whole note", which means something else in music. Now to your ...


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The best way would be, well, take a grab in the piano and play an actual bisbigliando on the strings! But that's hardly practical. Short of that, I don't think there's much better you can do than using both the sustain and una corda pedals and then using a regular pianissimo trill. If you have the option to prepare the piano, or use a digital one, there are ...


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I would say the best single English word is catalogue.


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Output. Oeuvre. Works/Body of work. I think that's about it.


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Before computers were widespread, I heard the word "output" used. I prefer oeuvre instead of just "work" (as Richard mentioned.) English likes (to anthropomorphize) to borrow words from other languages with similar meanings to get Anglicized words with similar but separate meanings. (Done by filing the serial number off of the word and ...


4

We typically refer to a composer's oeuvre. Since it's borrowed from the French, its usage in English is often italicized. If you're looking for an English phrase, we can otherwise talk about someone's "compositional output." I've occasionally heard "body of work," but that strikes me as something used more in other arts and less common ...


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Welcome to M.P.&T! You record it at 122.87 bpm! Why would that be a pain? The music editor wouldn't be expected to sort it out, much less the editor! If the cue started and ended at 120 and there were no tempo-changes, the music editor could, after it was recorded, speed it all up to 122.87, but obviously that would also shorten the music. S/he wouldn't ...


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I don't know the exact definitions but I think I read in another answer on this site that absolute pitch is the ability to sense the pitch of a note you hear with time and perfect pitch is the ability to sense it instantly. When I was younger, I felt like I didn't have one absolute pitch one speck. I feel like slowly and graudually, by brain was getting ...


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Such list will make lot of sense, because when you have this catalogue you can decipher and recognize written music much faster (sight reading! (like reading entire words than spelling the letters like a 6 years old child that starts reading.) That's is like a kind of meta or makro reading. You can make your list yourself: It will also be a good ear-...


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There was an attempt of "Copyrighting all the melodies to avoid accidental infringement", see this TED-talk: The numbers are huge!


4

The key word here is serialism. Serialism means that the compositional process is determined by a series, or list, of pitches and various transformations that occur to this series. A twelve-tone serialist will create a listing of all twelve pitches, using each once and only once. They can use this series (also known as a row), but they can also: Transpose ...


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The sad truth is that transcription software only does a (reasonably) good job on input that it would be quicker to do yourself by hand and ear. And if you COULDN'T do it yourself, how will you know whether the software has got it right?


2

Melodyne can detect the individual notes and save them to a midi file. For Piano you will need at least the Editor version, which is the lowest version that supports polyphonic audio (multiple notes played together as opposed to a flute that would only play one note at a time). From the editor version on it can also detect the tempo. I have yet to figure ...


1

I would do something like this as a foundation: That quarter pause works fairly well as a hook.


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One way to approach the question is to preserve the metrical stress points. Use the basic concept that longer rhythm values denote accents. Put the accents on first beats. Fitting 2 into 3 requires a reduction as the most straight forward change. Reduced values should produce weaker stresses so put those smaller rhythms on weak beats. The melody's phrases ...


0

To me all the previous suggestions feel unnatural. Regardless of whether a part is actually sung or played on an instrument – the listener will internally sing along, and you should avoid hiccupping this more than necessary. Keep “Birth” and “You” on strong beats. In a march, strong beats are ever more dominating, and these are the words that need them. Don'...


1

I know a fair number of professional musicians, and I'm one myself. The circles that I work in don't really have one specific method to determine the key of a song if its not already written out in sheet music form. My own method for duplicating the key of a song is to listen to the song and play along with it as it's playing. I'm able to usually find the ...


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You played something like this. That's fine. What's your problem with notating it? Or you could shift the accents and do something like this: I don't think you need any 'tips'. Your improvised version was fine, you got the march feel very well.


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Or MAY-be . . . ? Oops! Did it HAVE to be in 2/4?


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Only the 'theory' of balancing the security of repetition against its potential for boredom. A topic on which, say, Mozart and Philip Glass would doubtless have different views!


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If you think one purpose of music is entertaining then your thought I change whenever I'm starting to feel bored with the pattern. is a good point to change. Many people are not interesting in music when it becomes redundant. Others just like this redundancy and can't get enough. I would change, if I felt that I have nothing more to say. At the ...


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The most natural adaption to me would be in 4/4: the syncopation should be on the word “birthday“: quarter -, half note, “to you” quarter- and half note. And as you want it in 2/4 time the half note will be 2 quarter notes tied between bar 1 and 2. With other words like the original in 3/4 but the syllable "-day" counts 2 beats! (I must tell you I' ...


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May I suggest this? Losing the upbeat produces a pause between phrases during which the accompanying strings could do something fun!


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Your video is Happy Birthday in 2/4 but I think it would be more musical to take the written 3/4 version and add a 1/4 note duration to every downbeat so each bar becomes 4 beats, or two bars of 2/4. It would sound less rushed and would allow you to play it in a wide range of tempos. Bar 1 becomes half, quarter quarter Bar 2 becomes a half tied to quarter, ...


1

One thing I've found to be useful is breaking the pattern for emphasis. One rather trivial example would be a short piece in the common AABA format. One might keep the ostinato from A to A then break it at the end of the second A. The appearance of an ostinato (or other easily heard feature) or its sudden absence signals to the listener that something is ...


2

I can't think of a singular theory per se, but are you aware of the Gestalt idea of the Implication–Realization Model? In short—and I'm skipping over a lot of detail and nuance here—it's a theory of pattern completion. Something is implied, and then it is either realized or not. Similar Gestalt ideas were used by Leonard Meyer (in books like Emotion and ...


1

From what you have given us there: (b) "re, mi, do, si-la, so", and play it on "D, E, C, B-A, G" is correct to the notated score, just transposed from A (the key of the movement) to C. This is totally valid in terms of learning a melody, but it does remove it from its context, its key signature. Having done a lot of melodic transcription, from a jazz ...


2

First, scales are not keys. they're certainly related, but we don't write in scales, we write in keys - using scale notes, usually, but not always. Second, your other key is more likely F, as G has F♯ (fa diese). Third, using key C is not a problem on piano, and a lot of players would be happy there. But it's not always going to be piano. It could be ...


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