32

Types of connector Acoustic instruments, of course, don't have any kind of electrical audio output. For these you need a microphone. For the purposes of this answer, a microphone is just another instrument. Electric instruments have a socket in them through which an audio signal is output. There are various kinds of connector: 3.5mm phone – the same ...


18

There are indeed new languages, as well as libraries within other languages. I'm going to list a few that spring to mind off the top of my head, and maybe come back and expand my answer later. edit 03/17: I have slightly revised the answer. Notable that to a great extent, SuperCollider is often used as a back-end for systems based in a range of languages &...


14

What you're asking is similar to "I want to write great software, but I'm not a programmer and have no knowledge of computer science or programming or anything like that. Will I be able to write great software if I just get the right IDE?" I'm a programmer too; take it from me: YES theory is extremely important for what you want. Given that you are a ...


14

My sense (after writing parsers for ABC, MusicXML, Cappella, Noteworthy, and about 6 other formats; and output to Lilypond, etc.) is the limitations of ABC, the format, cannot be completely separated from the limitations of ABC parsers. As both Kevin and Chris noted above, the ABC format has the capacity to encode much of the complexity of MusicXML and ...


13

Important note This answer is now obsolete. FlexASIO seems to be the current solution. I think I know where is the issue. My Windows-fu is rusty, but here is what I found. Solution, in short Get ASIO multi-client from here or here (they are different, you might want to try both). After installation you should be able to use your interface with more than ...


13

Sure you can. It would require some knowledge in audio programming and analysis. However, I would advise to not reinvent the wheel and use existing tools, such as BPM Counter (free). I'm not sure if it can write the BPM into the file name directly, but once it's saved in the id3 tag, it's much easier to access it with your own program and then rename the ...


13

The ratio between the frequencies of successive half-tones in a 12-tone equally tempered scale is 21/12. So to lower the frequencies by a half tone, you need to stretch the file so it is 21/12 ≈ 1.05946309 times as long.


12

𝄫 is U+1D12B 𝄪 is U+1D12A [fonts are tiny in here unfortunately]


11

I suggest that you tried to Change Pitch, since this process is available, rather than time-stretch the song. Change Pitch will not change the tempo of the song. If you choose to time-stretch the song, Michael gives you all the information and perfectly answers your question. As far as time-stretching is concerned, depending on the method applied, Audacity ...


10

I found ASIO Link and it lets you listen to windows audio as well and send audio over the network. The price $39.95 AUD on Nov 10, 2016 so please ignore the price information in the below comment by mateen-ulhaq. Update November 2019: As explained in this post, the developer of ASIO Link recently passed away, and his nephew authorised the software to be ...


10

I'm happy to hear you're brave enough to start producing music with no musical background but being a passionate listener. You don't need a lot of money to do great sounds but in the beginning having a sample pack, great VST plugins and full version of a DAW does speed up the process of learning. ~300€ for the software and samples will do fine for more than ...


10

There's a way in Windows, without installing any additional software, to be able to write those Unicode characters out of thin air using ALT + Unicode hex number. If somebody wants to memorize those codes, he would be able to type them from thin air in a file name, a word document, notepad or other. First as described here, you need to enable ...


9

To answer your main question, yes you can do this by applying counterpoint to the melody tones. If you pick up a small book called "The Study of Counterpoint" by Johann Fux, it basically provides you with an algorithm for harmonizing any melody tone. The guy in the video isn't doing anything special;his left hand is just cycling through a standard and ...


7

You will probably need the help of the game's audio designer to learn the exact requirements and limitations; with a powerful enough audio engine in-game, you can really do anything imaginable. Presuming that you are not pushing the boundaries of video game music, though, you do still have a bit of freedom as a writer. You just need to think in terms of ...


7

This is actually very simple: Get a desktop PC - it will be upgradeable. Laptops aren't (easily) Get a lot of memory and disk. Doesn't matter how much, but the more the better so you can store files at high quality Get an external sound card. This is easily the most important piece of the puzzle. Good quality sound in can make for good quality out. Poor ...


7

There are a number of features planned for abc notation - major updates for v2.2 and v2.3, as well as a number of minor proposals. abc v2.2 is mainly concerned with "sort[ing] out ambiguities and incompatibilities in multi-voice music", relating to the 'control voice'. As far as I can see, both Lilypond and MusicXML have fully-fledged multiple voice ...


7

I would still recommend Csound as the best tool for text-based audio programming. It is actively under development and has kept pace with recent advances. One other worthy mention is a library called pyo which can be used with Python 2.7 and Python 3.5+. The developers for that have a lot of other nice tools which you might want to check out. If you want to ...


7

♯ & ♭ I use the system typing replacer. System prefs > Keyboard > Text All my triggers start with 'nc' for historical reasons, so 'ncsharp' becomes ♯ & 'ncflat' becomes ♭. I'm on Mac, so I've no idea about alt-codes for Windows, but if someone knows those... feel free to add. Windows seems to handle these in file & folder names just fine - ...


6

It is not a matter of quality. You can get great sounds from a computer and many albums have been made on nothing but a laptop or even an iPad or GameBoy. Quality is not the concern. There are good reasons for wanting hardware synths, though, even digital ones. They start up instantly and generally never crash. They have many knobs and controllers for ...


6

There are analogue and digital synthesizers. The digital ones you'll likely be able to emulate faithfully through a computer, but opinions differ when it comes to analogue. There are both digital synthesizers and programs that try to emulate them, but many feel that it is not like the "real deal". There is also a big difference manipulating real keys and ...


6

When I name a file of a music score on the computer, I use a 'b' as flat and '#' as sharp. My question is is there in the ascii code a way to use the real sharp or flat? No. There is nothing in ASCII. ASCII only has 128 characters, there's no place for musical notation in there. Unicode, however has over 136000 (out of 1114112) assigned codepoints (as of ...


6

We have to be a bit careful with the word 'interval' - there are a number of different ways of talking about relative pitch, and the word 'interval' might have different nuances of meaning across those. But in the context of your question, I would say that we care about intervals because: A given interval between two notes corresponds to a certain frequency ...


5

A quick note for when you decide to start using a DAW: If you have a Mac, it has GarageBand on it for free. GarageBand is a full-featured DAW, and since it doesn't cost anything, it's a good tool for learning how to use a DAW (an entire skill set in itself). It isn't as powerful as other DAWs, though, so at some point, you are going to want to buy something ...


5

Is music theory necessary to compose music? I remember writing a little tune (about ten years ago) just to try out a computer program. At that time, I knew nothing about music, and I had no interest in learning to compose or play music. I basically wrote a couple of measures (I had no idea what a measure was at the time) using only trial and error. It took ...


5

The infinity of the series isn't much of a problem: any Turing-complete language can deal with infinities. In procedural languages this tends to require rather ugly loop constructs. It's much nicer in lazy functional languages, the most prominent being Haskell. As for the algorithm itself – you can do something usable (if somewhat boring; the solution you ...


5

There is a fantastic site which provides all known Unicode chars and their numeric addresses. It's well - organized and can do excellent meta-searches. It's zahlee.info. For double sharp, 119082 U+1d12a for double flat, 119083 U+1d12b That's both decimal and hex.


5

If you want ascii this site has a list of music related ascii codes: https://www.alt-codes.net/music_note_alt_codes.php these are mainly the ones you asked about: ♭ Flat note ♭ ♮ Natural note ♮ ♯ Sharp note ♯ here are all the UNIcodes for music symbols: https://unicode.org/charts/PDF/U1D100.pdf i was able to take ...


5

If you'd like to just check that it works and you are happy using something simpler than a sequencer, you could use a virtual MIDI keyboard - that runs on your computer and will allow you to play notes out of your MIDI interface using your computer. An example is http://vmpk.sourceforge.net/.


5

One possible tool for such musicological calculations is the music21 library for Python http://web.mit.edu/music21/


4

You need amp emulator software. Guitar Rig is one well known example. You can download a demo version for free. Whatever software you get, it will come with detailed instructions. Your USB audio interface also has detailed instructions. It may well have come with some demo software. To record, you need a digital audio workstation. Examples of these for PC ...


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