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How to argue that it might be a good idea for a composition to follow music theory more closely? IMO you don't. If you think that is what music theory is about, the burden is on you to make that case. lacked any key...without any sense of direction...The melodies were slightly ambiguous...chord that didn't even contain a third or fifth of the "chord&...


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You'll notice many people here have a kneejerk reaction: "there are no rules in music!" Which is true of course. "If it sounds good it's allowed!" That's true too of course. Oddly, with literature very few people question the use or necessity of grammar, punctuation, spelling etc. Sure, you're allowed to break those rules in literature ...


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Looked at from the widest possible perspective, as mentioned in the many comments, music theory doesn't give you any rules on what you should or shouldn't do, nor can it tell you if a certain musical idea is good or bad. What it can do is give you a framework to describe patterns and structures in music. Enjoyment of music is subjective, which means that ...


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You need to be more clear about what you mean by "follow music theory". Some of your statements are materially false, like; "Music theory has been in place for the course of human history..." Human history is millions or years old (if you include our primitive ancestors), and the oldest known instruments found by archeologists are 10's ...


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Music and its reception is always opinion based. Music styles and music theories are and have always time-bound and temporary 1*). But there are some acoustic phenomenons that are objective and seem to be accepted in western music theory as implicit logical: the ratios and frequencies of overtones. Maybe this natural appearances and and physical laws have ...


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Although I don't think there's a widely-accepted term for the specific phenomenon you're describing, it has some analogy to appoggiatura, which is sometimes done with a tone in the melody from the previous beat that is "held over" for a moment in the following beat after the chord changes. The analogy isn't perfect, because an appoggiatura is ...


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