9

Late edit Re the other, anonymous, answer Of course you have to pay [If I hadn't already made that clear] The main issue is whether you will be allowed to use it at all, if you've heavily modified it. This will vary by territory. I only know the UK stance on this, however… In the UK, you need no permission to simply cover a song. It is a legal requirement ...


9

If caught without asking permission up front, it gets you a law suit, or at minimum, a takedown. Commentary is not covered under music publication laws, but under far more stringent broadcast laws. You could try to claim "fair use" but it's far better to have written permission first. They may even give you usage for free, if you're lucky. Note: Laws ...


8

Complicated question, and disclaimer: I am not a lawyer Yes they are copyrighted. It's ok to record a song by Duke Ellington and publish the album as long as you pay the rights to whatever association manages these rights in your country. In France it is the SACEM, I believe that in the USA, the RIAA is in charge of this, and according to Wikipedia, in ...


7

“The Real Book” is now published by Hal Leonard and yes, the songs in the book are all copyrighted and published. That wasn’t always the case, early editions of The Real Book were bootlegged, the songs were transcribed and books were printed and sold without paying royalties to the publishers and composers of the songs in it. If you plan on recording songs ...


6

Of course. The performance itself is immediately copyrighted the moment it's recorded. If it's never recorded, then copyright doesn't really apply, as there's nothing to enforce. The only thing that confuses people is who owns the copyright - that's the owner of the recording, which is not necessarily the same as the person who played it. This even applies ...


5

I assume the chances of making a piece too similar to an already existing piece, is high that's quite true! especially since the music I'm making is very simple Don't worry, all melodies I know are related with others. If one will strike for copyright ... just tell me and I will show them a dozen of other tunes that already existed before someone came ...


5

Like user2808054 says, if you're just messing around at home, you can do what you want. But if you're going to start publicly displaying your music (for money or not) a number of different rules start cropping up, such as copyright, and various other Creative Commons licences. Arrangements If you write an arrangement of a piece, you need to give credit to ...


4

It depends on what you're going to do with it. If it's just for home use and your own enjoyment, then you can do what you want. If you're going to try to sell it and call it your own (ie, a commercial venture), then there will certainly be an issue about copyright. Working out who owes who what is a hugely complicated area. If you're remixing a song, using ...


4

Within the USA, If a musical composition has previously been released in recorded form, anyone may record their own version if they file a request for a compulsory license (which the copyright holder is required to grant), pay a certain fee per copy distributed (it used to be 8 cents for works up to 5 minutes, or 1.6 cents per minute for longer works, but ...


3

To recap, we are considering the question of whether the minor key theme in Mahler's Sixth Symphony, Andante Moderato movement, is similar to the subsequent composition of either or both of the two melodic themes in Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez, Adagio (the second movement in this work), so similar as to support a hypothesis that Rodrigo unconsciously ...


3

I’m far from an expert on copyright law but organ and keyboard accompaniments are usually fairly generic chords or arpeggios, bass lines and drum beats. Music copyright cases are almost always based on copying a melody although copying a portion of a recording or a very distinct groove can lead to a lawsuit too (1,000,000 rappers vs James Brown or I Want a ...


3

The answer depends on where you got the voice of the sports commentator: If you hire someone for the purpose of your recording, then you own the copyright, and your use of the sound recording does not infringe on your own rights. If you use a recording of a sports commentator that is in the public domain, then there is no copyright to infringe. Whether a ...


2

Fair use laws in the U.S. are middling-ly clear imo, but I find Fair-dealing laws in Canada less so. Europe and the UK have their own similar frameworks. Generally, it depends on how/why you are using the recording (parody, education, etc.), how much of it you are using etc. If you think people will hear your song and that you will earn money from it, then ...


1

YouTube automatically scans videos for copyright violations, which can be either good or bad for you depending on what material you use. Depending on their agreement with the copyright owner, YouTube will either take the video down or direct the ad revenue to the copyright owner. So you can post your works to YouTube, but understand that they might get taken ...


1

The Giraffes? Giraffes! recording was released before the Daft Punk recording, but that doesn't necessarily tell us when either was written. To me the obvious difference is with meters. Giraffes? Giraffes! mixes meters, but the Daft Punk stays in 4/4 time. It's hard to compare the tempos with different meters, but the Giraffes? Giraffes! track feels ...


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