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2

your first thought about bar 17 is correct - it's the secondary dominant of chord IV (it doesn't modulate to C major). The underlying chord sequence is a bit obscured by the figuration and the avoidance of 'problems', but line 1 below shows the origin of these bars. Line 2 shows what happens when we decorate the bass line to include the ascending and ...


1

Allowing, as you say, this is a matter of interpretation, here's mine: At the beginning of measure 17, there is a clear arrival in G major. The second half of that measure, along with the first half of measure 18, tonicize C major -- the pre-dominant key relative to G major -- before moving to D7 -- the dominant -- in the second half of measure 18. From ...


3

You question is kind of confusing, because you're mixing terms. Hidden and direct and synonymous. Both are used in describing movement to a perfect interval by similar motion when the first interval is different that the second. Like a sixth to an octave with both voices ascending. Parallel is more specific within the class of similar motion. Both intervals ...


1

As I read various counterpoint summaries, the only problematic case is the soprano jumping (and turning state's evidence?). This emphasizes the octave and sounds like a voice dropped out. The best check is to listen for a noticeable "thinning" of the sound.


2

Mann cut off some sections from Fux's book. There's some discussion of this in Mann's translation, but I really don't remember where. Maybe next to the end of the book, after 4-voice 5th species. But every counterpoint book now has a section reserved to it. You may look out for Jeppesen, Gauldin, Benjamin, Kennan, Thakar... the basic rules are most the same, ...


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