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Exactly as ttw's answer, in most situations, inverted melodies of an already good melody will make sense. The trouble, however is finding the underlying chord progression that fits well with the inverted melody that does not involve the progression breaking any rules of harmonic progression or straying into an unknown domain (consecutive augmented chords ...


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There are two books which I would recommend for dealing with this voice-leading. It is best to approach the subject in order of the texts. The first is a book which describes the actual methods and instruction of composers of the era, from a historical and theoretical point of view. There is much in the book for instructing oneself to write in the style. It ...


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Not commenting on anything else in the music, my first reaction is: the harmonizing voice moves in parallel with the subject, that's a counterpoint/voice leading problem with the harmonizing voice. Change the harmonizing voice(s.) Being passing tones mitigates the problem somewhat, but the fact they are in the outer voices is a problem. Sometimes the way ...


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I think this is an nice theme and I wonder how you have been “harmonizing” the previous entries. I can hear the chord progression I vi IV (ii) V. In this case you could give the bass line to the 2nd part: e c# a b e (bar 15) avoiding the dim. 5th parallel (c#-d# and g#-a). To avoid the octave parallels you could slightly change the theme (soggetto) in ...


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The "rule" applies everywhere in that having parallel octaves causes the music to sound like an instrument or voice dropped out. The texture suddenly becomes thin. Similarly for parallel fifths or covered fifths or covered octaves. The effect is strongest between outer voices. Even in pop or country, one tries to avoid parallels between the bass and melody. ...


6

Your passage is entirely musically valid. You have parallel octaves when you have two notes that are a perfect octave, in the same voice that repeats. This is also true for the unison. What you have here is one chord that is held for the whole measure and a little floral pattern that moves a bit in the Soprano voice, this is not parallel octaves. I'm not ...


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Begin with the root tone. The first note should be a long value. The second note might be a fifth a second or a third (up or down) Pentatonic scale are good to play inverse To go sure for 100% create a melody which contains already its inversion in the second phrase. (last proposal was just a little joke)


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Almost all good melodies are not bad when inverted, at least around their first note. Melodic interval of seconds map to seconds, thirds to thirds, fourths to fifths and vice versa, sixths to sixths and sevenths to sevenths. You could make a list of intervals then their inversions around whatever axis you like. As an aside, sometimes inverted melodies (as ...


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Yes. I think you understand and describe it perfectly clearly! It might help you to know that the way people try to objectively qualify the consonance/dissonance of an interval is the frequency ratio of the two tones. That's frequency in regard to the vibrations, like A440 Hz. The octave above would be 880 Hz, double. As a ratio it's 2:1, a simple ratio. ...


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Historical view: Gregorian chant allowed only songs in unison, prime and octave, later the perfect fifth and Fourth. (Organum). The purpose of this rule was the auditive intelligibility of the word of God. Aside this aspect it seems to be a fact that dissonant chords are stressing the ear and disturbing the concentration - even the 3rd and the 6th have ...


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There's lots of literature on the subject. (Google, Google Scholar, etc.) The question is why some combinations seem to "require" motion and some seem not to. To some extent, it's cultural; to some extent, even within culture, it's stylistic; to some extent there seems to be some acoustic reason. Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


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Counterpoint can be written for basically any number of independent parts greater than 1. (And even for a solo instrument, there's something called compound melody that can simulate counterpoint as if in multiple voices.) Counterpoint in more than four parts isn't only in the 19th and 20th centuries, either. Bach, for example, wrote several motets and ...


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You seem to get the general gist of it. But the blanket condemnation of fifths and octaves in the middle of your exercises is too much of a generalization, even in first species. The main purpose of good counterpoint is, as you said, independent lines that are oriented towards the same goal. If your lines, in your opinion, become more independent and "...


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You seem to be going about it the right way. And I think that's a pretty good summary of counterpoint. Repeating things - notes or intervals - can lead to a lack of variety or of melodic independence, but I think you can have one repeated note and up to three repeated intervals in a shortish exercise. The 'repeated interval' rule probably exists for the ...


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Melodic activity in the bass doesn't necessarily imply frequent root changes. The melody may jump from one chord tone to another, or it may move from one to another by way of passing tones. Both techniques appear in the example you've chosen. How did composers of the era solve this apparent paradox? It's only a paradox requiring a solution by the ...


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I was not with them but I can tell you from my experience of playing Euphonium in the brass band. This instrument has usually the c.p. to the melody of the cornets. I started at the age of 10 years and after A few years I was able to play this kind of variations (broken chords, motifs, passing tones, change notes and contrary voice leading without knowing or ...


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My experience is that each period has created its own rules and the best way to study the different practices is to analyze the style different of composers of different periods, to find out similarities and differences - and not learning the rules of the species of a composing style that never existed. Mind the history of music is a history of change and ...


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This is an important question, and I have two main responses to it: 1. Counterpoint is less about "rules" and more about matching an earlier compositional style Many students are overwhelmed by the various "rules" of counterpoint. In many instances, these same students feel as if their own creativity is being inhibited because these rules tend to go ...


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The main point of first species counterpoint is to develop a feel for creating two-voice music with independent voices. That is, to have to melodies, which are decent melodies in themselves and which combine nicely. There is a good description of Medieval Counterpoint by Margo Schulter but I can't find it at the moment; I'll try to see if it's bookmarked ...


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