New answers tagged

0

Polyphony and counterpoint: you can write a counterpoint voice leading without respecting the traditional c.p. rules. The main point is that in this organisation of different parts the voices are each one emanzipated of the other voices, fully indepedent but also interdependent by using similar material, copying motifs or imitating. Polyphony and ...


1

'Polyphony' describes music that combines two or more melodic lines. Not just melody and block chords. (Though even the most monophonic piece may well have some polyphonic interest between melody and bass line. Things are rarely absolute in the music world.) 'Counterpoint' is another word referring to the same thing. And 'Part-writing' is what you do to ...


1

One hint: The figured bass realization doesn't need to have full four-part chords all the time. Most written-out realizations are far too busy and detract from the other parts rather than supporting them. Also, a realization that works well for harpsichord, or piano, or organ probably won't work nearly as well for either of the other two instruments. I ...


1

I’d say there is no short cut, except of playing Bachs figured Bach (e.g. keyboard accompaniment of Cantatas and Chorals) and compare it with the rules. You will find that Bach broke the rules as the figured bass accompaniment was not always following the strict four voice-leading rules. So when you have played some accompaniments like Jesu Joy of man’s ...


3

You can‘t join 2 neighbored chords without having hidden parallels. And they have no common tone! Most important is counter movement between bass and soprano. Notice also example 27 on the next page: Hidden fifths can actually only be avoided by doubling the 3rd of the second chord like in harmonic minor V-VI.


2

In standard harmony, you do have the thing that the leading tone can fall down by a third. This only applies to cadences and should only be done in the inner voices. Also, I can imagine that the leading tone can resolve down when it is part of a diatonic seventh chord built on the tonic note of the scale ie I7, then you have the practice that the fact that ...


1

The leading note has a tendency to resolve up to the tonic. Be aware of that tendency. Going anywhere else may sound odd. (But odd can be good!). If we're working within the rules of Bach-style 4-part harmony, there's this thing where having a full chord at a cadence and avoiding consecutives can take precedence over voice-leading, particularly in an ...


7

You're absolutely right! The typical rule is that the leading tone must resolve up to tonic when it is in an outer voice (that is, the soprano or bass). If the leading tone is in an inner voice, it can resolve down a third to the fifth of the tonic chord (a so-called "sprung" or "frustrated" leading tone). Bach occasionally leaps the leading tone up to the ...


0

An example of the principle that Richard describes:


4

In this style, an octave leap (almost always ascending) is acceptable as long as you resolve the leap in the opposite motion by step. In other words, an ascending octave must then move immediately down by step. In fact, this is true of most large leaps in this style. If you look at both voices of this example, you'll notice that almost every leap of a third ...


Top 50 recent answers are included