25

At the risk of covering something you may already know well, let's take a detour and be clear about what crash and ride cymbals are and how they are different. Then the explanation of what a crash/ride is will make more sense. There are three main characteristics that determine most of a cymbal's sound: size (diameter), weight (thickness), and profile (the ...


11

For your first question. Your cymbal is oxidized, and the green color is called patina Initially, bare Cu metal atoms react with air to form the pink oxide, cuprite, Cu2O, which has Cu+1 cations. This gradually oxidizes further to the black oxide, tenorite, CuO, with Cu+2 ions. The black sulfide CuS also sometimes forms. In the presence of moisture, ...


10

Hit both the cymbals once . The "Crash Cymbal" should produce a loud, sharp "crash" The "Ride Cymbal" should produce a sustained, shimmering sound Sample of Crash Cymbal sound Sample of Ride Cymbal sound


9

The purist, jazz drummer in me will tell you there is no difference. You can place a cymbal wherever you want and play it however you want regardless of what word the manufacturer decided to print on it. You can ride a crash and crash a ride. "Crash" and "ride" are just divisions we've made based on how well they produce certain kinds of sounds. So really ...


7

This cymbal is an alloy of copper and tin. The green coulor is the a phenomene of the oxidation of copper. It can be cleaned and will disappear by a chemical reduction with hydrogenium. https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Cymbal_alloys the link of wiki says: Cymbal alloys From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [wikipedia page] Cymbals are made from four main ...


3

Yes oxidation, and all the scientific stuff everyone was mentioning. I have seen sweat, spit, and assortments of alcoholic beverages turn cymbals into this color. Essentially moisture and air as I believe a few have said. To clean it all you need is some Brasso (or comparable metal polish), a cloth, and some elbow grease. Take your time, work in sections ...


3

As @Meaningful Username pointed out, the ride is usually heavier than the crash. It is also typically larger than the crash (ride usually 20 inches in diameter and crash mostly 14 to 18 inches). If you hit the center region of a ride, it produces a bell-like sound.


3

More often than not the word "crash" or "ride" is printed somewhere on the cymbal in question. A ride usually is thicker and heavier than a crash.


2

To add to what's here: Ride cymbals will not be very loud when struck (comparitively), but will have overtones that last for much longer than crash cymbals. Crash cymbals, for the most part, are meant to accent the beat - be loud when hit, then fade quickly. If you hit both very hard, across the edge of your stick, listen to see what is still ringing many ...


2

I hate to break it to everyone but, this is not oxidation at all... Yes, copper-based oxidation is green and occurs for all the reasons stated but, it's also (9 times out of 10) highly localized and crystalline in its formation, even in the worst cases. As pictured here: What is pictured in the OP is a cymbal that is covered with too much cymbal polish that ...


1

In general wet will have more sustain. Dry will be dark with a very fast decay. Simply put wet just rings more.


1

Cymbals use an alloy containing copper so they tarnish and corrode over time, even if they are not touched with sweaty fingers. Some drummers prefer tarnished cymbals, though I think it's more about (or entirely about) image than sound quality. One drawback to polishing your cymbals is that it will remove the black logo. If you do decide to polish them, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible