25 votes
Accepted

Difference between a ride and a crash/ride cymbal

At the risk of covering something you may already know well, let's take a detour and be clear about what crash and ride cymbals are and how they are different. Then the explanation of what a crash/...
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12 votes
Accepted

Crash cymbal turned green

For your first question. Your cymbal is oxidized, and the green color is called patina Initially, bare Cu metal atoms react with air to form the pink oxide, cuprite, Cu2O, which has Cu+1 cations. ...
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9 votes

How do i differentiate a crash cymbal from a ride cymbal which looks so similar

The purist, jazz drummer in me will tell you there is no difference. You can place a cymbal wherever you want and play it however you want regardless of what word the manufacturer decided to print on ...
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  • 309
8 votes
Accepted

Recording technique: not letting the crash cymbals ring out

Disclaimer: I'm in no way an expert in cymbals or recording (yay! guess that makes me fully qualified to provide answers on the Internet) but here's $0.02 from my experience. This cymbal is not only ...
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  • 1,026
7 votes

Crash cymbal turned green

This cymbal is an alloy of copper and tin. The green coulor is the a phenomene of the oxidation of copper. It can be cleaned and will disappear by a chemical reduction with hydrogenium. https://...
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7 votes

Recording technique: not letting the crash cymbals ring out

It's hard to give a definitive answer for a particular song, because there are many ways to skin a cat and we don't have the raw recording on hand. I suspect it's not a single thing resulting in this ...
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  • 421
4 votes

Recording technique: not letting the crash cymbals ring out

You asked about recording techniques, so this isn't really answering that question, but regarding the actual cymbal, it may be a Zildjian A 18" medium thin crash. This is what I pieced together: ...
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4 votes

Crash cymbal turned green

I hate to break it to everyone but, this is not oxidation at all... Yes, copper-based oxidation is green and occurs for all the reasons stated but, it's also (9 times out of 10) highly localized and ...
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3 votes

Crash cymbal turned green

Yes oxidation, and all the scientific stuff everyone was mentioning. I have seen sweat, spit, and assortments of alcoholic beverages turn cymbals into this color. Essentially moisture and air as I ...
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2 votes

How do i differentiate a crash cymbal from a ride cymbal which looks so similar

To add to what's here: Ride cymbals will not be very loud when struck (comparitively), but will have overtones that last for much longer than crash cymbals. Crash cymbals, for the most part, are ...
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1 vote

What makes a cymbal "dry" or "wet"?

In general wet will have more sustain. Dry will be dark with a very fast decay. Simply put wet just rings more.
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  • 6,990
1 vote
Accepted

Cleaning Up Zildjian Cymbal Stains

Cymbals use an alloy containing copper so they tarnish and corrode over time, even if they are not touched with sweaty fingers. Some drummers prefer tarnished cymbals, though I think it's more about (...
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  • 434

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