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6

Following @Aaron's answer, if Cubase doesn't support such time signature, you can still find a workaround by manipulating the tempo. E.g. if you want to have the 5/4 section in 120 BPM (120 quarter notes per minute) you can notate the 4/3 section as follows: set time signature to 4/4 set tempo to 3/4 of the 5/4 section tempo, e.g. 3/4 × 120 BPM = 90 BPM ...


5

Steinberg have two 'remote' working solutions, VST Connect & the new VST Transit I haven't used either in my real workflow, but was involved in early betas of Connect, which at the time looked very promising.


5

If your characterization of "white noise" is somewhat accurate, you are out of luck. You can get various bits of noise from unstable power supply and inverters for step-up DC/DC converters and ground loops. But those will be whining or humming. Broadband noise, in contrast, is almost sure to originate from the analog circuitry of your microphone, and it ...


5

Are you certain that you really mean 4/3 as the time signature you want? There’s no way that Cubase can handle this extremely rare, unusual and controversial time signature. It would imply that the beat unit is defined by the triplet half note, and even in my world that does rarely see this kinds of time signatures, times like 4/6 or 4/12 are far more common....


5

4/3 is what is known as an "irrational" meter. Accordinng to this discussion on the Steinberg website, Cubase is not able to handle it.


5

Recording audio for this kind of use is called sampling, and an instrument that can record and play samples is a called a sampler. There are software and hardware samplers. A sampler that cannot actually record is (sometimes) called a playback sampler or sample player, to distinguish them from "real" samplers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampler_(...


4

Screenshots are from Nuendo 4, the coeval of Cubase 5. So it should be similar. In the "VST Connections" menu add two stereo busses for each stereo-out of your USB sound card. I called them "Main" and "Headphones". On channel settings pick "Main" for Symphony and Guitar channel outs. If your click is the default Cubase click, in the "VST Connections" ...


4

I think this is exactly what you're looking for: https://www.bandlab.com/ I've never used it myself, but from what I gather it's sort of like Google Docs, only it's a DAW. (Google DAW?)


3

No. Unfortunately Asio4All in cubase does not support using more than one device . Whichever device is switched on first gets control of the driver. ASIO officially does not support more device per driver although there are workarounds for other DAWS. The only exception is FL Studio.


3

Wrapping up what I found out researching: There are lots of samplers out there, commercial, free, expensive, less expensive. The comments and answers regarding samplers helped me to find the right search terms. If you have Cubase already, the new sampler track of Cubase 11 is able to do a lot of this already out of the box. But there are not very much ...


3

I'm going to take a wild swing at this, based on guesswork. I think the root of your issue is that your kit is sampled in stereo, yet only has 4 stereo output buses, switchable to 8 mono. You are splitting your individual sounds into 8 mono recordings, in effect, whereas what I think you want are 8 stereo. You can't render in place for 'pure' Midi. Midi ...


2

Asian Squirrel, you can either buy a MIDI to USB cable, which I would not recommend because of the latency. Latency is the delay between when you press a key and when it registers in your DAW as a midi note. If you're interested in the MIDI to USB cable, here's a link: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Uno It's the cheapest option. You can also buy an ...


2

I figured it out! While using Groove Agent SE, you can just drag the audio parts or slices you want onto the pad you want them on; then you can just "Create Drum Map From Instrument" and then edit the drum part in the drum editor thing like normal.


2

Change your track settings from tempo based to time based. Then change the tempo of your project to fall with your recording. It is the little icon with the clock (when your track is time based) or a note (when it is tempo based). Then you can revert your track back to being tempo based.


2

I just fixed the problem. It was from the PC itself. A audio enhancer was installed on my sound card, I just had to deactivate it. If you encounter the same problem, check the EQ of your sound card, and if you have an ASUS, turn off "Waves MAXXAudio" Thanks everyone for helping.


2

Your guess is true. In the Good Old Times™, when USB did not yet exist, MIDI ports were fixed hardware devices that stayed there even if the cable was unplugged. So the Windows MIDI API has no easy way to report changes. You sequencer might re-read the device list when you open its configuration dialog to select another port. But if not, then the only time ...


2

Maybe the "white noise" is fan noise from your computer? If so, putting some distance between computer and microphone and letting the microphone face away from the computer (a cardioid microphone usually has a marked sensitive side, with the least sensitivity being just opposite) might help.


2

I think you are hearing is a vocoder. See if Cubase has a vocoder plug in. That should do the trick. Your cover sounds great by the way.


2

While some cue notes are useful, as suggested by commenters, they require advanced type setting (smaller notes and transposition, possibly also a different clef). Actually the standard solution is, to write a complete score with multi-bar rests, indicating how many bars are to be skipped, but containing everything else, like general pauses, fermatas, ...


2

As far as I understood what you want to do, the workflow should be the following: Record MIDI (you have done it) Edit the MIDI recording, as needed Create an audio track in your DAW. Connect output of your electric piano to the input of your audio interface. Record Audio: set the cursor to the beginning of the project (or beginning of the section you want ...


1

If I understood correctly, Shreddage II is a VST instrument and Peavey Revalver is an effect. In that case, you need to create a track that has Shreddage II as an instrument, and add Peavey Revalver as an insert effect to it. An alternative would be to create an effect track with Peavey Revalver and then add this effect track to your Shreddage II track as ...


1

Sadly I don't get your question exactly... However, the reason why anyone would say you should record at -6dB's is just because you don't want any clipping of your audio signal. I do a lot of orchestral music with virtual instruments for example. The software that's used is named Kontakt 5. In the settings I can choose if the instruments should be loaded by ...


1

Create a MIDI track instead of an instrument track to hold the MIDI notes. Create multiple instrument tracks for all the instruments. Use the “Sends” section on the MIDI track to send the one set of MIDI data to multiple instruments. One advantage of this method is you retain independent mixing of the different instruments. Another way to deal with this is ...


1

In most instrument VST's like Kontakt, you can choose the input/output of the VST. If you just open multiple instruments and route them to the same midi channel, every change you'll do in this midi channel will then affect all VST's


1

The thing about Cubase is it has a 1,300 page manual. The other thing is that, until you've read that manual at least 3 times, you're going to struggle. All documentation is available via the Help Menu. Everything is key-commandable - literally everything. Every menu, every function, every user-made preset. If you need harmonic transposition, then ...


1

A MIDI cable is usable only for sending MIDI messages in real time. The manual does not mention any setting that would enable sending messages when playing a stored song. To be able to access the internal files of the device, connect it to the PC with a plain USB cable.


1

The difference in quality depends on a few factors, of which you listed the major ones: microphone, interface and processing unit (sound card in this case). Using a 3.5mm mic-in or line-in means the sound card in your computer must transform the analog signal from the mic into a digital signal that the CPU can understand. It does this with the help of an ...


1

USB microphones have a built-in sound card. Sound cards that may be installed in your computer will not be used for the recording and will therefore not affect its quality. If you noticed an audible difference between recordings on different devices, one likely cause is you're comparing them using different quality playback devices. It's very unlikely your ...


1

This is standard behaviour in music applications. You can't 'hotplug' a USB device. Have everything connected and powered up before starting the program. Don't be surprised if a USB device loses contact after the computer goes into a power-saving standby mode either. The solution to both these issues is simply 'Don't do that, then!'


1

The fact this happens in various different software packages shows you it isn't caused by them, so no, don't bother buying a new DAW package. I'd lay odds on it being because you have a USB mic plugged directly into a laptop - this is rarely a good idea if you want even semi-decent sound quality. So get yourself an audio interface. If you do want to ...


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