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Opera, ballet, and music in general has changed. It is getting smaller, and there is more growth in the "chamber" realm. I personally know composers of both chamber operas and "chamber" ballet/modern dance. The number of performers is much smaller, and the venues they perform at are much smaller. This music is being written, but it will fly under the radar ...


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As I understand it, these pieces were composed by Brahms after being inspired by some Hungarian folk tunes and dance tunes. I think it is unlikely that he ever seriously considered whether anyone could actually dance with these pieces as accompaniment, and really that is not important. You might also like to look at a lot of other classical pieces which ...


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For ballroom dancers (either Rhythm in the US or Latin in International styles) the steps are counted: two, three, cha-cha-CHA where the last CHA is on the downbeat. Much of the rhythm is sounded by the guiro. The guiro plays either 4-4-4-88 (where 4 means quarter note and 8 means eighth note, I can't quickly figure out how to post an image or pdf) or 4-88-...


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first time poster here, so apologies if I mess up any formalities. As a former competitive latin dancer, I will try to explain this in dancer terms, then put my pianist hat on and try to get the musician's perspective. There are 3 versions of cha cha that I have danced: international latin, rhythm, and night club. Latin and rhythm have been thoroughly ...


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The short: The count/the placement of the 1 should be exactly the same for dancers and musicians. Having been both a competitive dancer and a musician, it saddens me to see people saying otherwise. The long: I danced competitively for years, and also made a living by teaching Ballroom for a little while. I think the things you're seeing online are a result ...


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It's probably because there are just fewer ballet companies than there once were. It's a lot like why there are fewer operas being written today. In a world of increasingly scarce arts funding, a composer would be writing a work that would require not only a concert hall, a conductor, and orchestra, but also a full dance troupe (or vocalists, for an opera), ...


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At least for dances from the Romantic era and backwards, music for different dance types in the same meter and tempo are not quite interchangeable. For example, even though they are both fairly slow dances in triple meter, the polonaise uses an 8th-16th-16th rhythmic pattern more often, emphasizes the first beat more, and often sounds more stately, while the ...


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How you count 6/8 and 6/4 is relatively the same. They are both compound time signatures with two groups of three beats making a total of 6 beats in each measure. You would count each of them as: 1 2 3 4 5 6 The bolded beats represent the strong beats that make up the two different groups. However, based on what you described I would suggest keeping it in ...


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"one two cha-cha-cha" used by dancers is indeed musically misleading as the "one" for dancers is not the one in terms of musical measures. The 3rd "cha" is actually the first beat of the following bar: 1---------2---------3---------4--------|1---------2----... ...one-------two-------cha--cha--cha------- Try to clap your hand on the 1 (beat of the ...


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The basic time signature for jive has always been 4/4. Dancing to it generally starts on beat 1, just like pretty well every other dance around. If it was 6/4, every other bar would put the dancers out, apart from which 6/4 is usually felt as two lots of 3 - 123456, which certainly wouldn't be easy to jive to. EDIT: I think your timing of 1, 2, 3&4, 5&...


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I wouldn't read too much into the 'dance-like' comment. There are lots of dance rhythms - a stately Pavane, a flowing Waltz, a spritely Minuet, an energetic Jig, a frantic Tarentella etc. etc. Someone thought the Beethoven reminded him of one of these. A valid opinion, but not Holy Writ.


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Beethoven said nothing about dancing. In fact the first performance of the 7th was at a charity concert to raise money for veterans of the Napoleonic wars, and Beethoven's own introductory speech said We are moved by nothing but pure patriotism and the joyful sacrifice of our powers for those who have sacrificed so much for us. However, Wagner described ...


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It is referring to the dotted 6/8 rhythm after the dramatic intro. I have also heard this 2 sections might have the subtitle: invitation to the dance The fast 6/8 reminds me on a gigue or tarantella (event. also a waltz - as 6/8 can be heard as 2 x 3/4 measures) As it is said in the quotation below the gigue has 3/4 (triplets) or 12/16th and the tarantella ...


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Prokofiev almost certainly didn't intend "Romeo and Juliet" to be performed with narration because there is no narration in the score. It's not usual for ballets to be performed with a narration, although it might be done in certain cases, e.g. for educational purposes.


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You didn't really explain if your song is also in Eb minor. Knowing only the key probably isn't enough to recommend what to do except in general terms. Assuming you are playing minor blues, maybe try changing to Eb Dorian mode to change the mood away from bluesy. But also think about rhythm and melodic contour for that change of mood. You might be able to ...


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It depends on the chords. As a general principle, you can play any note against any chord. But it might be very dissonant if it is the 'wrong' note, which means you have to resolve it. So you need to play a chord tone to resolve it. If the piece is in E minor, you need to identify if it uses a V-i or v-i. And if it uses a V-i, does it use the major 7th in ...


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Nothing wrong with the minor blues scale, but by removing a single note you turn the minor blues into the minor pentatonic scale. I.e., Eb-Gb-Ab-A-Bb-Db becomes Eb-Gb-Ab-Bb-Db. Eb natural minor will do the trick as well. Personally I would stay away from harmonic and melodic minor for the song you listed (Can't Stop The Rain) as they imply harmony that moves ...


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You have told us what 'breakdown' means in EDM, and I believe you. 'Break' has a much earlier usage in jazz music. It's when everyone else stops for a few beats and a solo instrument fills the gap with a flourish.


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Cha-cha has a 4/4 time signature. The first three beats are quarter notes, last beat is two eighth notes, which are emphasized. So you get: one-two-three-CHA-CHA one-two-three-CHA-CHA etc. The beat is up tempo. The mood of the dance is flirty and playful. Search for "cha cha" on YouTube for examples. Another great example of a more current cha cha tune ...


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I googled "mambo puertorriqueño" and found http://www.mamboenclave.com/en/articulos/?ide=8 which says ... el dos refleja el estilo puertorriqueño de tocar las acongas o tumbadoras, porque éste enfatiza el dos más que en, por ejemplo, el estilo cubano. Translating, ...the "on 2" reflects the Puerto Rican style of playing the conga drums, because this ...


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Since you are trying to explain 2 bars of music, in 3/4 time, it needs only to be called 2 bars of 3/4. The beat is measured in crotchets (quarter notes), and there is no need to change that. Were it in 3/8 time, still 2 bars rather than 6/8 is more appropriate. It may work if you call it 6/4, but why complicate it. Dancers can count up to two easily - and ...


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