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At least for dances from the Romantic era and backwards, music for different dance types in the same meter and tempo are not quite interchangeable. For example, even though they are both fairly slow dances in triple meter, the polonaise uses an 8th-16th-16th rhythmic pattern more often, emphasizes the first beat more, and often sounds more stately, while the ...


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Is there any classical music written specifically for dances? I think I don't [know] any. You have essentially answered your question - albeit, by excluding much of the classical music that was composed specifically for the purposes of dancing to it... Also, there are quite a few misconceptions in your question. For starters, you seem to have a ...


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I wouldn't read too much into the 'dance-like' comment. There are lots of dance rhythms - a stately Pavane, a flowing Waltz, a spritely Minuet, an energetic Jig, a frantic Tarentella etc. etc. Someone thought the Beethoven reminded him of one of these. A valid opinion, but not Holy Writ.


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Beethoven said nothing about dancing. In fact the first performance of the 7th was at a charity concert to raise money for veterans of the Napoleonic wars, and Beethoven's own introductory speech said We are moved by nothing but pure patriotism and the joyful sacrifice of our powers for those who have sacrificed so much for us. However, Wagner described ...


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I call the piece that I am composing, Valse Quasi una Sonata, which translates to Waltz almost like a Sonata One thing to have in mind: The terms "sonata" and "sonata form" are two entirely different matters, and that can be quite confusing. Sonata is originally an instrumental composition as opposed to a cantata which is a vocal composition. But that goes ...


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You'll keep it coherent in exactly the same way you would if it was in 4/4, 6/8 or any other time signature. The essence of Sonata form is presenting two themes in contrasting keys (the Exposition), messing around with them in a variety of keys (the Development) then repeating them, but both in the same key (the Recapitulation). You might consider a bit ...


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I see no problems with keeping a waltz in sonata-allegro form coherent. I've composed tougher and more aberrant sonata-allegros. A ragtime sonata-allegro, compete with properly repeated strains of conventional length...a heavy metal sonata-allegro...a 20th century-style toccata in sonata-allegro form, complete with the increased dissonance typical of 20th-...


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I think you make good point to exclude stylized dances like Baroque keyboard suites where the music fits the general meter and tempo of dance styles, but wasn't actually used for dance accompaniment and ballet where the audience did not dance. Having acknowledged that there was classical music written with the intention to accompany actual social dancing. ...


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It is referring to the dotted 6/8 rhythm after the dramatic intro. I have also heard this 2 sections might have the subtitle: invitation to the dance The fast 6/8 reminds me on a gigue or tarantella (event. also a waltz - as 6/8 can be heard as 2 x 3/4 measures) As it is said in the quotation below the gigue has 3/4 (triplets) or 12/16th and the tarantella ...


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Prokofiev almost certainly didn't intend "Romeo and Juliet" to be performed with narration because there is no narration in the score. It's not usual for ballets to be performed with a narration, although it might be done in certain cases, e.g. for educational purposes.


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You didn't really explain if your song is also in Eb minor. Knowing only the key probably isn't enough to recommend what to do except in general terms. Assuming you are playing minor blues, maybe try changing to Eb Dorian mode to change the mood away from bluesy. But also think about rhythm and melodic contour for that change of mood. You might be able to ...


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It depends on the chords. As a general principle, you can play any note against any chord. But it might be very dissonant if it is the 'wrong' note, which means you have to resolve it. So you need to play a chord tone to resolve it. If the piece is in E minor, you need to identify if it uses a V-i or v-i. And if it uses a V-i, does it use the major 7th in ...


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Nothing wrong with the minor blues scale, but by removing a single note you turn the minor blues into the minor pentatonic scale. I.e., Eb-Gb-Ab-A-Bb-Db becomes Eb-Gb-Ab-Bb-Db. Eb natural minor will do the trick as well. Personally I would stay away from harmonic and melodic minor for the song you listed (Can't Stop The Rain) as they imply harmony that moves ...


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