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28

One of the most common pieces of advice I hear about this is to take breaks. You're right that in some situations (extremely tight deadlines, for example) this may not be practical, but in reality, it's the best way to achieve the results you hope for. Listening fatigue is a real thing, and the phenomenon you describe, coming back to a song you liked only ...


16

Taking breaks has been mentioned, and is obviously a good idea! Other ideas: A change is as good as a rest: work an a different project for a while, and come back to the first one listen to other music in a similar style - or even a different style - to get your bearings again, and tune yourself back in to what's normal listen on different systems, and ...


9

Quantizing percentage means how much closer to the quantization grid's perfect timing position the timing (position and/or length) of notes is moved. 0% : the timing is not changed at all. It's a no-change operation. 10% : the timing is moved 1/10 the way from its current position towards the exact quantization grid value closest to the current position. ...


7

You can produce music without a DAW, and synthesizers don't have to be played live by a human player. There's this thing called MIDI, introduced in 1982. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIDI With MIDI, devices can send instructions like note-on/note-off to each other, effectively playing the other device. A device called sequencer can play a synthesizer by ...


6

By copy/pasting the exact same sound to two tracks then panning them hard left & right, you have in fact created a mono sound that just takes up two tracks. In stereo recording, the very definition of centre-panning is that the same sound comes at the same volume from both sides of the stereo field. The only way to perceive the attack as not centre-...


6

3d12 and topo morto covered most of it, but having a good set of (correctly positioned) studio monitors also makes a huge difference. You can mix more effectively and at a lower volume, and you tend to spend less time wandering down the wrong path because you can identify problems more precisely. I make somewhat bottom-end heavy industrial electronica but ...


5

I have a USB mic A USB Mic is basically a mic with an audio interface built in. Of course it's all you need if that mic is the only sound source you need. But what if you do want to record a guitar, or a synthesizer? Or you want to use a specific mic that doesn't have USB? That's one reason to get an audio interface - you can connect anything to it. and ...


5

Steinberg have two 'remote' working solutions, VST Connect & the new VST Transit I haven't used either in my real workflow, but was involved in early betas of Connect, which at the time looked very promising.


4

I think this is exactly what you're looking for: https://www.bandlab.com/ I've never used it myself, but from what I gather it's sort of like Google Docs, only it's a DAW. (Google DAW?)


4

I think it's important to note that not ALL of the notes are C. They have stabilized the bass and vocals on one pitch. The accompanying instruments are shifted as well, but not to C - they keep their relative position to the original notes. You can hear the synths and strings hitting a variety of notes other than C.


4

I was reading something that mentioned playing the same octave of two notes on different instruments but having them at different frequencies. Is that possible? There are a couple of senses in which this statement could be true: As per Michael Curtis' answer, there are transposing instruments where the notated note is a number of semitones different to the ...


4

I think this is a case where the terms 'note' versus 'tone' are important, and scientific pitch notation can help make things clear. When the term 'note' is used we really should be talking about notation, something written on paper or its equivalent. A 'tone' is a more abstract idea, basically it's just a pitch, a frequency. The tone C4 is 261 Hz. If two ...


3

If you record sounds from your synthesizer into a DAW then aren't you just recording the audio? Yes. Wouldn't it be better to record midi information Only if you can get exactly the sound you want from your MIDI chain. are synthesizers ever used in music production yes. Jean-Michel Jarre uses analog synthesizers to achieve effects that may be ...


3

You can use the German/Dutch form: for example Cis, Ces for C-flat, C-sharp respectively. Two characters, true, but they are regular (ascii) letters.


3

If it sounds "better" then that's all that matters. Your audience isn't critiquing some measurement deep in your signal chain, any more than it's analyzing your musical notation or your precompositional cocktail-napkin scribbles. If you're worried that you're breaking a rule, plenty of musicians -- both composers and performers -- have pulled off stunts ...


3

There are a few things you should do: Ensure the track is armed for recording In most DAWs, a track will not "play" unless armed, this is to help avoid MIDI inputs triggering every track all the time by default Enable the Virtual MIDI keyboard Per this post on the forums, one user posted that this is in the "view" menu of Reaper Set the track to receive it ...


3

notes that fall off the grid that are then quantized to 100% will then fall exactly on the grid. If you quantize to less than 100% they will move closer to the grid but retain some of the, let’s call it, character of the performance. The lower the percentage the closer to the original performance it will sound. The higher the percentage the closer to the ...


3

How do I create this sound? This kind of sound is usually created with modulation on synthesizers. Like @foreyez already mentioned in the comments, you can use an LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator) to modulate your sound. For example you can set up a low pass filter on some basic sound which will filter out the top end of your sound. So only the low end part ...


2

As I think you already know, To increase the audio buffer size beyond what a particular audio driver allows, you need a different driver. The closest thing I know to a 'universal' ASIO driver is Asio4all - you could try getting in touch with its author and asking if they could add another setting or two! As illustrated in piiperi's answer to your other ...


2

I believe it's the sample rate. If you are recording at 48 KHz and your card is one of the basic ones it won't be able to switch between the two. So if you wanna use it to practice over a youtube video or something like that, just lower the sample rate of your daw to 44.1 KHz and that should solve it ;)


2

No, there's no de facto or official equivalent for sharp that compares to the accidental (ha!) equivalence of flat and lower case B. But some filesystems will let you use # or even more esoteric symbols in file names. Even so, even in 2019, it's safer to encode the key in some kind of metadata instead of in the filename.


2

It sounds like you may have recorded in Song mode, as opposed to Pattern mode. To find your Song recorded notes: Go into the Sequencer module, change to Song mode at the bottom, then tap the button at the top left of the screen that looks like a grid. This puts you into the piano roll for Song, and the button changes to keyboard icon. Tap the text box ...


2

There are several plugin formats, and VST is only one of many. It was developed by Steinberg (now part of Yamaha) in 1996 for a very old version of Cubase. It is the most common format, but there are other popular formats. Some DAWs support VST plus other formats, and some DAWs don't support VSTs at all. Logic Pro uses Audio Units. Protools uses RTAS and ...


2

Let me take a try at this and hopefully I don't mix up my terms... A sequencer is an application storing a sequence of events for tracks each of which sends MIDI data to a MIDI voice to be performed by some machine like a synthesizer. The key point being that MIDI is a type of data or protocol. The sequencer knows how to communicate with the MIDI protocol.


2

Back in the days before home computers were powerful enough to process audio, applications like Cubase and Logic were themselves called MIDI sequencers - they were the software counterparts of hardware sequencers like the Alesis MMT-8. Both software and hardware MIDI sequencers at this point could handle multiple tracks of MIDI data, usually transmitted on ...


2

Yes. Not sure what else I can say…


2

In general, to generate a "wub" you just have to change the timbre over (a relative short amount of) time. If the amplitude (volume) is changing it's called a tremolo. If the frequency (pitch) is changing it's called a vibrato. If the timbre is changing it's a "wub" in a dubstep context, or a "wah" in an electric guitar context. So you use the same tools ...


2

FL Studio is quite simple to use. It's very powerful, too. You can buy the basic version for only 99$.


1

Ableton Live has quite nicely working audio-to-MIDI facilities, for melody-to-MIDI, harmony-to-MIDI and drums-to-MIDI. Check out examples from Youtube. And there are separate plugin products like MIDI Guitar 2, which is incredibly good. And if you want to write songs, why not record your acoustic piano as an acoustic piano? Many song writers record their ...


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