19

The advice to get a digital piano that transposes easily given in other answers is excellent; when I played keys in a cover band once upon a time that's what I did. Learn the pieces in whatever key is convenient for you, and then change the setting on the keyboard before the song. Practice changing the keyboard settings. That's part of your instrument, and ...


18

What I've found is that the acoustic piano is the most expressive when played softly. We all like loud, but anything can be loud and the ear will tune loud OUT after a while. But it pays attention when things get quiet. And that's where weighted keys really help - on a digital too. If you don't have that weight, you'll get a more frequent oops-BANG ...


15

In terms of standard height: A Steinway large grand piano I believe is 28 1/8" (71,5 cm) high from the floor to the top of the white keys. You could call that a standard. The hight varies for different makers, and pianos, with over an inch higher and lower than that. (My Yamaha upright piano is 28 3/8" [72 cm].)


15

XLR connectors should be your preferred route, as balanced cables have a much lower noise level by their design - they are constructed such that noise induced by electromagnetic interference cancels itself out, whereas signal doesn't. If you want stereo, you need to use two cables. As you can see 1/4" has a Left and a Right, and XLR has a Left and a Right. ...


14

The biggest mistake that many starting-out (and professional) keyboardists, including pianists, make is sitting at the piano incorrectly which results in playing with tension. Make sure you learn everything you can about correct bench height (generally, your forearms should be parallel with the keybed), sitting in a relaxed manner and relieving all muscle ...


14

Modern digital pianos have a number of features that expand the number of notes that might be simultaneously present in the output: Some polyphonic voices last a long time after the key is released, so if you play a lot of notes quickly using these voices, you may end up having dozens, and even a hundred notes still sounding while you're adding new notes. ...


14

You are overthinking this. You are free to use whichever fingers you like when playing a piece but obviously some fingerings will work better than others. What you need to do is to find a fingering that works for you and then try to always do that. Your "muscle memory" will simply work when you have practiced enough. If you find a passage where there are ...


13

Roland FP-80 Connectors section at Specifications tab contains the following: PEDAL (DAMPER/R, SOFT/L *, SOSTENUTO/C *) So I'll presume, that those are the pedals required for the answer. As stated at Piano pedals article on Wikipedia: Modern pianos usually have three pedals, from left to right, the soft pedal (or una corda), the sostenuto pedal (...


13

Why would you need more than that? Five semitones up and six down can make every possible key: Let's say the original MIDI file was in C major. Up 5 semitones and you can get C C# D D# E and F. Down 6 semitones and you can get C B Bb A Ab G Gb. I am aware that you cannot transpose to a different octave using that but for practical purpose that is easily ...


13

Both Kawai and Roland are reputable brands. But Kawai CN37 is a brilliant digital piano. From my experience with some digital pianos, I wasn't able to use a great range of dynamics, but with Kawai CN37, I can somehow control how my dynamics are expressed on the piano, and it's quite comparable to the likes of an upright acoustic piano. I haven't tried Kawai ...


13

The keys of e-pianos today are weighted. My son is professional pianist. He plays on different grand pianos and keyboards and he never complained about losing skills. I wouldn’t worry about yours especially as you say you play fun stuff. Mind that also the keys of different pianos haven’t always the same weight and the distance of the hammers to the ...


12

If you are playing an organ sound, you might want a keyboard that can feel and respond like an organ, rather than a piano It's possible to make a very shallow non-weighted action, which is helpful for some techniques (I like it better for triggering percussive sounds, for example) It's cheaper to make, so instruments are cheaper. The instrument is lighter ...


12

I would differ from Wheat Williams’ answer. The sustain pedal is essential. A variable-resistance sustain pedal, often marketed as “half-damper”, will also make a world of difference: non-variable-resistance have an entirely different feel, and your son starts on those, then he will have to largely re-learn his sustain pedal usage when he gets to a real ...


11

some voices on your digital piano contains more than 1 tone, for example an organ single note may consist of 3 or 4 voice samples (polyphony) so , when you press 10 claviers it will produce about 40 sound samples... 128 voices of polyphony will let you hear your sound fully and without note cancellation.


10

Weighted keys offer a different kind of response to the touch of a finger since they have more stationary momentum. This helps connect your physical action to the sound itself, which results in what seems like more expressive piano playing. The other thing you are experiencing is the difference between velocity control for either instrument. If both the ...


10

The term 'clavier' (as used in the original question ) encompasses all keyboard related instruments, from harpsichords through foot pedals to modern pianos and organs. I'm guessing you mean a piano/keyboard of the electronic type.If so, I suggest 61 notes - 5 octaves - will be enough to keep you going for two or three years or more. You will find that the ...


9

We try to find a good fingering - that might mean 'good for YOU' considering your hand size - and stick to it. Not because it's a 'rule', but because it's effecient! You don't want to be hunting for each note every time you play the piece! Let your hands learn where to go, then your playing can become fluent.


9

In the 1980s we had home computers with Microsoft BASIC interpreters that had a "PLAY" command where you could type notes and other musical instructions as text. The system is called MML, Music Macro Language and it has its roots all the way back in the 1970s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_Macro_Language According to the Wikipedia page, some ...


8

If you use a short length cable (for Home Studio use), it won't really change much. Using balanced cables is good for long cables (10 meters long, on stage), but just for a 2-meters-cable connection : piano <--> audio interface the difference will not be important. I such situations, I go for 1/4 JACK because it's simpler for home studio use. ...


8

TL;DR If I were you, I would care only about the sustain, and made sure the piano and the pedal support more than just on and off states. Surely, if your son keeps practicing there will be a time when the other pedals will start to make a difference. However, you should think then about getting an acoustic piano. The three main pedals of the piano are: ...


8

Let me break it down from a language point of view so we can better understand how these words were chosen in the context of controlling the sound of musical instruments and thereby gain a better understanding of what they mean when used in a musical context. The word brilliant describes a high degree of intensity in perception by the senses. Possible ...


8

I'm only a guitarist, but I play once a week on a real piano at my teacher's studio, and I have a Yamaha P-115 digital piano at home (weighted keys, $600 retail most places -- I got lucky and paid $400 at a salvage store). The feel is a bit different between the two, but it's in the ballpark (for a tyro like me). No trouble adjusting. I originally started ...


8

The forte symbol: f means "loud", but it doesn't mean just play that note loudly; successive notes after this symbol should also be played loudly, (until another dynamic symbol is encountered). The marcato symbol: ^ means "marked" or accented. This symbol only effects the notes it is on, and successive notes should not be accented. The sforzando symbol: ...


7

Classic grand and baby grand is 28-29 inches. Period. Answer made! I measured 30 pianos from eight manufacturers and nearly all were inside this range. This is without wheel stands or any other such things. This is floor to top of white keys when on the standard legs. I would build your desk for the lower dimension as it is much more comfortable for a ...


7

Playing too fast too early is the most common mistake I know. It leads to bad habits of movement: your fingers don't move enough, because they are to weak and then the whole hand and arm "helps out" but they cannot keep the velocity for long time, so they start to cramp. Which of course influences breathing and blood circulation in a negative way, and so on.....


7

The thing about piano is that unlike most other instruments, playing in the extreme high and low registers is not any more difficult than playing in the middle. So there is a lot of easy music that uses the highest and lowest keys. For classical music, 88 keys is essential. On top of this, any decent electric piano is going to have 88 keys. Shorter ...


7

Besides the possibility to have multiple sounds assigned to a single key, another important point is: use of pedal requires the previously sounding notes to continue as opposed to terminate suddenly just to re-use the channel for the new notes.


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