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2

Speaker cabinet does effect the sound. If it didn't, we'd have speaker elements in thin frames instead of the bulky boxes. If you're using the speaker elements from the old piano, a good starting point would be copying the dimensions of the space around the element. But, if you're already making the effort to build a new cabinet, it could make sense to find ...


3

Worth looking at speaker design. I daresay the speakers and how they're mounted isn't particularly hi-fi orientated, so the opportunity to improve their mounting and cabinets, to make it sound better - I'd go for bigger speakers, maybe woofers and horns, with a crossover, and maybe a more powerful amp/pre-amp for a much better quality of sound straight away. ...


2

Not that it's a job I'd like to tackle myself, but you should be pretty safe with that type of design. Almost none of the sound quality will be dependant on the actual case construction, pretty much entirely the speakers. The lower modesty board/baffle might impart some resonance - you can test for that by knocking on it & seeing how much it 'sings'. ...


2

The brain is very quick to adapt to varying weights and sizes of keys. The first thing though is to have an ergonomic technique. Then the brain can make the proper adjustments to abduction, weight and elbow movement. If there are flaws in your technique your brain won't be able to overcome the differences. It is like walking barefoot, with heavy boots, in ...


4

Without knowing that particular model, I'd guess you probably need "full volume" to properly match an acoustic. If you ever try actually accompanying people live in a 'gig' situation, you will quickly discover a digital piano just cannot reach the levels you can with an acoustic, without further amplification. Pianos are pretty loud. That doesn't ...


2

ASIO4ALL is just a CPU emulation of real ASIO and it's always slower than hardware supported ASIO. So check if your audiocard supports hardware ASIO. If it doesn't - you can either buy a new one or just accept that it can't do it with appropriate latency.


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I think it's different from person to person, depends on how opened we are, how adaptable to different things. Most people I know, doesn't have any problems switching from one to another, and even different instruments. I just bought a Roll up piano for my boyfriend's birthday gift. It has 81 tones, a little bit smaller tiles than standard piano, but with a ...


3

It will be the same as when you are climbing up 2 stairs with different degrees of steps. If the difference of the steps inside the scale are equal but different between the two stairs you'll be easily adapting the new distance when climbing the other stair. But when the distance is changing on the same stair you will stumble and struggle like a wanderer ...


6

can you switch easily between normal and mini key sizes like it was two different instruments, or do you feel that your playing on a real piano is badly impacted with the bad habits you constructed playing on the mini keyboard? I haven't noticed anything bad caused by playing mini keyboards. Mini keys are a little awkward to play, so I won't try to play any ...


2

It's a long road. I'll just add some points that helped me (note each of these are long topics, I'm just give my short thoughts on them): You need to understand basic music theory. If you can take a basic music theory course or go through a book chapter by chapter, that will help. There's a lot of information here that musicians take for granted, what the ...


4

You were able to type that question, because you can improvise - in natural language. Written language at least, apparently, but most probably spoken language as well. The skill of improvisation in music comes the same way as improvisation in natural language: by hearing and mimicing existing expressions. First you just try to copy and repeat what you hear, ...


4

This is on its way to being closed, but it sounds like you need, first and foremost, a teacher. You say you know nothing about how to play any instruments - piano included. There's always two distinct parts to learning music on any instrument. There's the instrument itself - how it produces the sounds, and there's the music - a huge subject on its own, which ...


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