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MIDI-USB adapter cables are indeed the way to go, and I actually own that same exact cable you linked for my home recording setup and it's worked fine for me over the last several years. One thing to be aware of is that some keyboard models won't output the MIDI if you have other outputs plugged in (like line-out), so if you're not getting the signal as ...


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There are many reasons to play scales, but they all come under one general purpose: To prepare you to play actual music. So you should play them in the manner that best prepares you. If you are about to perform a piece that contains mostly staccato passages, it might serve you best to play your scales staccato. If you find you are having trouble with legato,...


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a) release the previous note at the same time that I press the next note b) let go BEFORE I press the next note OR c) let go AFTER i press the note (but not so much that it bleeds together)? This is a question of articulation: a) called portato, non legato b) staccato -> Staccato Signifies a note of shortened duration or detached (not ...


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Practising scales is about warming up, learning which notes go with which, diatonically, and for playing in exams! How you play them, as Heather suggests, can and should vary- a lot! Play them piano; forte;slowly;fast;staccato;legato;with crescendo/diminuendo;combinations of all the above! It's a different situation for exams - they need to be played ...


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Practicing scales is about notes and fingering. You can use whatever articulation you would like, and it is helpful to mix it up. Sometimes play separated, sometimes slurred. Maybe an alternation of two notes slurred, two notes staccato. The options are endless, and what you choose is based on what goals you have.


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The first thing I would do if this were my piano would be to remove the bottom panel above the pedals to see what's happening with that pedal. I suspect the linkage may have simply come apart and it may be a real easy repair. The next thing I would do is pay for a tuner to come and tune it up. Once the upright is taken care of, that's when I might consider ...


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Contrary to some of these comments, Digital Pianos can last MANY years, I have four Digital pianos that I purchased new in 1987, 1990, 1991, and 1999 respectively, me, my wife, four of our 7 kids and hundreds of my students have been playing on them 5 or 6 times a week since then and ALL 4 of them still perform just as good as they did the day I bought them, ...


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So many factors involved here. Where you live, where the piano is situated will have a bearing on how an acoustic piano will cope with changing temperature/humidity. No such problems with an electronic (digital) piano. Unless you pay a lot of money, you won't buy a good acoustic piano - which will need transport and re-tuning soon after - an extra expense. ...


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If you just want it for joy and hobby you could buy a digital piano. (There are many advantages: Price, costs for tuning, weight, transport, loudness, mobility, other sounds, connection to computer and others. If you have the goal to become a pianist (level of piano teacher) you need an acoustic piano.


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According to https://www.casio-intl.com/asia/en/emi/products/cdp230r/spec/ the unit has 48 notes maximum polyphony which I can only assume applies to both the keyboard buttons and the sound engine inside. So all the notes should sound. (Some very low end keyboards might only be able to play one or two or three notes at the same time. Yours can do much better ...


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