31

'Gain' just means 'amount of amplification'. It can be applied at various stages in the signal chain between musical source and final playback. The topic we're talking about is called 'Gain staging'. It basically means that at EVERY point where amplification takes place we should strive to keep the signal above the noise floor but below the overload level....


28

There are many aspects to hard rock singing, and each singer (hell, each song) has a different approach. I know that even death metal vocalists can do their scary vocals without doctoring them in the studio, and I know some really "clean"-sounding singers have to fix uo the tone in the studio. So it depends a lot. In hard rock, a lot of the "aggresiveness" ...


15

In amplification jargon, all volume changes are described by the term "gain", where gain is the ratio of the input and output signals. In a lot of modern amplifier design, there are effectively 2 separate "gain stages" where signal amplification is performed: the input, or "preamp" stage, and the output or "power" stage. The input stage amplifies the ...


14

It depends, is the answer. And it also depends on what you call "distortion" - do you mean it in the sense that a guitarist would, or just that the sound is changed? Microphones are the first potential source of distortion. Sometimes you want a "smooth" mic, but sometimes you want one which puts a bit more "grit" inio the sound. Mics are fairly consistent ...


13

It's true that distortion, especially heavy distortion causes a lot of compression and evens out most of the dynamics. But a softly picked note is not only quieter, it's also duller, that is, it contains less high frequency, even after distortion. Since we are more sensitive to high frequencies, some dynamics can be achieved just by picking softer or harder. ...


10

Interesting effect indeed! Obvious thing first: don't use a pick when playing Knopfler parts! His tone is very much dominated by the particular way he plucks the strings with his fingers, often snapping them down on the fret board. Here, like often in his soloing, he's playing a double stop; he usually does this with the thumb and index finger, almost ...


9

Several issues come into play here. I use Jazz III picks, and I am of the opinion that for fast playing, hard picks should be used. There is a possibility that you are using too much gain, or extreme EQ settings which amplify the unwanted noises. Even so, using used picks will produce more noises, since they get a jagged edge. Most important though, is to ...


9

When your effects are adding to the sound, you need to balance that by subtracting something in your playing. So for example, when heavy distortion is adding loads of new frequencies, playing two-note chords is the difference between a nice crunchy rock chord, and a mushy fuzz. With delay, you need to leave room in your playing, for the delayed sounds. It'...


9

Electrical engineer here. Gain is the ratio of the output signal magnitude to the input signal magnitude of an amplifier. In idealized circuits, as you turn the gain up, you increase this ratio and the signal's gain increases and it gets louder. Or you reduce the ratio and it gets softer. No distortion occurs. However, in the real world, even well-designed ...


8

Ok some insight I got from a high-end Mixing Engineer from one of the best recording studios in Germany: With distorted guitars: First get the sound right, then thing about eqs and stuff THEN: Be careful with the high pass: Some Guitars have needed power in the 70-90 hz area (punch, impact). It is often useful to boost this area to give the guitars more ...


8

Short answer: Certain effects like overdrives and distortions typically go in front of the amp. Other effects like reverbs and delay typically go in the effects loop (when possible). Long answer: The effects loop on an amp usually sits between the pre-amp and power amp sections. Most of the "tone" of your amp comes from the pre-amp. Pre-amps tend to ...


8

Since the most iconic Tube Screamer sounds I can think of (e.g., Stevie Ray Vaughan and Trey Anastasio) have been created using very clean amp sounds, and distortion/overdrive pedals were invented to be used instead of overdriving an amp (back in the days when amps didn't generally have drive circuits and the only way to overdrive them was to turn them way ...


8

This is feedback - caused when the sound energy from the amplifier causes the strings to vibrate, which is picked up by the pickups, and so on, in a cycle. It usually only occurs noticeably when the amplifier is applying a lot of gain to your signal - but this would include the use of distortion effects in the signal path, so a loud, distorting amp (or a ...


7

The conventional usage is to put distortion effect in front of the pre-amp; then, when you engage it, it drives the pre-amp harder, so that you get both the pedal's intrinsic distortion as well as pre-amp distortion. That being said, you should try both positions, and see what you like; there are no hard and fast rules.


7

Well, this is certainly a kind of distortion, but not the kind you get with a fuzz pedal. Fuzz and distortion pedals are characterised by sharp transistor clipping. Rather, the kind of distortion that you hear on old, loud records such as fire comes usually from tube amps that weren't originally meant to sound much distorted at all, but were just taken to ...


7

You'll have no idea whether you're really hearing a pedal correctly or not until you fix or replace that bad cable. The same goes for amp settings. Cranking the master volume throws off the EQ balance of the amp, so you're not even able to set the amp in a way that was intended when the amp was voiced. That's a bit less relevant for modeling amps but still a ...


7

I'm dropping this answer in early, assuming I might be right rather than being certain at this point. I posted an example of a totally different style track, but I think using similar techniques - so I can easily describe how I did that. I don't have the file to hand to be able to directly copy/paste or screenshot the settings, but I used this setup a fair ...


7

It's as I said in the comment: Gain is referring to the input, volume to the output. Volume is how loud the OUTPUT of the channel or amp is. It controls loudness, not tone. Gain is how loud the INPUT of the channel or amp is. It controls tone, not loudness. https://www.musicianonamission.com/gain-vs-volume/#targetText=Conclusion%3A%20Gain%20Vs%20Volume&...


6

When I first started playing the electric guitar seriously, loud pick noise used to be a big problem for me, to the point of obsession (you tend to hear more when you're annoyed with it). Then it gradually disappeared. I think it was all about my bad picking technique; I probably used to hold the pick with too large of an angle. Now I have the ability of ...


6

I think the best definition of a bass growl is A strong fundamental combined with a strong midrange overtone. Bass growl is typically found in acoustic standup basses which have wound strings. A strong pluck (pizzicato) will cause the wound strings to rattle against the fingerboard, causing the growl. The wound strings seem to be essential for this ...


6

Ernie Ball makes both an overdrive and a delay effect with a built-in effects pedal. Here is a review and if you are in Britain here is a shop that sells it. PS Unaffiliated.


6

The "gritty" sound in rock singer's voices is their natural voice, albeit a technique that gives the sense of screaming or growling. Something else that should be considered is that there are many hard-rock style singers who are smokers, which can significantly affect a singer's voice. Note: Increasing your risk for lung cancer is not worth it to achieve a ...


5

Controlled feedback is a useful technique although it's as old as Hendrix. I like to use high gain and distortion and a wah so that I can hit a single note and control its feedback crescendo and decrescendo with careful muting. When I do this, I put the wah between the distortion pedal and the guitar. What are some ...


5

There's a point of paramount importance the answers so far haven't even mentioned: as with anything nonlinear (and metal-guitar distortion is the most nonlinear you get in audio production) it makes very much a difference whether you EQ before the distortion, or – with exactly the same settings – after the amp plugin. That's why you can't just simulate ...


5

The K20-X manual has a pretty thorough explanation of how to get overdriven sounds. http://www.deanmarkley.com/Info/LegacyAmps/Manuals/D1015.pdf In brief, an amp like this has two stages of amplification: the first stage "preamp" feeds into the main amplification stage. If you turn up the level of preamp, then there will be some distortion in the preamp ...


5

Depending on the amount of clipping, the waveform of a very distorted signal can approach a square wave. Mathematically, a square wave is an infinite sum of overtones, with each higher overtone at a lower intensity than the previous. Near the bottom of this page is the infinite sum of a mathematically exact square wave: http://mathworld.wolfram.com/...


5

You can definitely use your distortion pedal to make a different sound. Whether or not that is better is going to be entirely down to what sounds you like yourself. As ever with these sort of things, try it and see.


5

The Beatles' distinctive vocal sound was shaped largely by double-tracking, in which the singer would record himself twice, attempting to repeat the performance exactly as before. Later recordings used the equipment to accomplish a similar audio effect on only one recorded track: automatic double tracking. A similar, but scarier, effect is obtained in ...


4

The problem with distorted guitar sounds is that all the harmonics are accentuated. A pure (clean) guitar note will have some basic harmonics sounding, but they will be 'recognised' and will give you a note to quantify. Given two notes, the harmonics will be heard from both, and depending what the interval is, it will be easy or hard to specify the notes. A ...


4

It's not a problem, it's just lack of training. You need more interval training for your ears. Since you can't make out polyphonic melodies, try training polyphonic intervals. Like an example, play C+E -- F+A -- G+B -- C+E and other similar examples. After a while, try something a bit more difficult. Also, try to change the intervals. In the example I gave ...


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