7

Since the standard 4 string double bass only goes down to E, and the cello down to C, this has been an issue for centuries. Many 4 string basses these days have an extension device fitted to the E string which enables Eb, D, Db and C when needed. This might be a cheaper option for you. Also, plenty of 4 string players are quite happy to tune down to a D ...


5

I'm treating 2 frets as one This is pretty close to the way people play double bass, but not 100% true. The most common technique people study (and the one I've been studying) is the one Franz Simandl wrote in his books New method for string bass. Basically he goes the "safe" way, assuming you are an average person, not a 2-meter-tall person with giant ...


5

The are defined in the introduction. The arrows mean "full bow" and the other symbol (which is fairly standard) means "at the frog". See the picture for the full set of symbols - apologies for the poor quality.


3

Yes, I agree that you are probably right. The arrows mostly likely indicate using the whole bow. I have been a professional double bass player for about 40 years and I have never come across those symbols. They are not standard. If the second symbol does mean play at the frog, it is slightly unusual since it is a pp passage and would be more comfortable ...


3

If you know the scale length of a string instrument, then you can calculate the position of each fret by taking the distance from the bridge to the previous fret (starting from the nut) and dividing it by 21/12 or 1.059463 (ignoring practical details like string height, gauge and tension, which do affect intonation but have only limited impact). These are ...


2

So: does the intonation of the harmonic actually change when I release it, Yes. and why? Because the pressure of the bow on the string changes the tension (and, microscopically, the length) of the string. It's not dissimilar to a guitarist who bends pitch by sliding the string laterally on the fretboard. I suppose that the action of the bow driving ...


1

A five string bass has been my answer for many years now - albeit an electric bass guitar. That won't help you as you don't want to spend lots of money, even for a string bass. The option of de-tuning is not a bad one, but will jeopardise the rest of the piece as far as fingering is concerned.Were you using an electric bass guitar, then I'd recommend a '...


1

Roughly speaking there are 2 kinds of upright bass, depending upon where the heel of the neck starts. On a "D" bass when you hold the first string and slide down the neck your hand will naturally stop when you get to D on the G string. On an "Eb" bass the heel will stop you at Eb. So the heel will show you where the 7th or 8th fret is. The join of the neck ...


1

One factor is proper maintenance of the right hand. The nails become an issue for sure if they are allowed to grow too long. Despite the use of nails on classical guitar they are not usually grown very long. Most books show the nails flush with the ends of the finger or just 1mm beyond. The string is actually plucked from the finger pad and nail together ...


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