14

Beethoven wrote those low notes even though he knew they were not playable on the instruments available. The subject of Beethoven's disregard for the range of the bass has been much discussed. Stephen Buckley has written a dissertation on the subject: " Beethoven's Double Bass Parts: The Viennese Violone and the Problem of Lower Compass". One of the possible ...


13

First I’d like to point out that all the info provided by @BenCrowell is on the money. I would just like to add a few points from the perspective of a bassist. The bass does lend itself to some limited double stops and the best by far are 5ths. They give a nice powerful growly sound. The instrument is tuned in 4ths and since you can only bow adjacent strings ...


12

In writing for strings, the double stops you typically see are thirds and sixths written for a violin solo. In a violin concerto, for example, this gives the soloist a chance to show off some harmonic color and sound fancy. On the violin, these intervals fall comfortably under the fingers of the left hand, and a proficient player can easily play them in tune,...


7

I would strongly advise against Solution #2 (tuning the string down). Especially if this is a school/amateur orchestra (as you say), this could wreak absolute havoc. I have enough experience giving, for example, B-flat trumpet players C parts to know that this all too often leads in disaster. In the absence of C extensions, Solution #1 is really your only ...


5

I strongly recommend renting if you can't afford even a beater bass. Even if you do tune a cello in 4ths, the resonances will be different. And more important, the bow hand positions and pressure/speed behavior when playing on bass strings, on a bass, are radically different from a cello. It's not like switching from a half-size to full-size cello, where ...


5

Historically there have been some jazz bassists who have also played cello and tuned it in 4ths, I recall Oscar Pettiford was one of them. He even recorded it a few times. As @Old_Brixtonian mentioned the scale length is VERY different. The scale length of a 4/4 cello (27.375”) is shorter than even that of a short scale electric bass (30”) and a 3/4 upright ...


5

How many note you play in the trill will depend on the tempo. But however many notes you play the last two will be the grace notes. If the piece is classical, you would start the trill on the upper note. Some examples:


3

The answers by @Richard and @PiedPiper already give excellent advice and detailed information relating to this specific piece. I just wanted to give a succinct, practical-advice answer for any future readers: Get the basses to play the E♭s an octave higher. If necessary, get them to play surrounding notes an octave higher, too, to avoid awkward leaps. Sure,...


2

Tuning down can work in some limited contexts. I've seen it done for a single low E-flat or D surrounded by rests or at the end of a movement, played as an open string. So confusion over changing fingerings for other notes was not applicable, and the bass was re-tuned for everything besides that one note. This was in a student orchestra, and the teacher ...


2

How high the harmonic is above the open string isn’t the primary issue, it’s the natures of the partials themselves. The 2nd partial harmonic an octave higher should be a true octave above the open string. This will be true, therefore, of all doublings of two. The fourth, eighth and (if you can find it) sixteenth partials have the same relationship to the ...


2

So: does the intonation of the harmonic actually change when I release it, Yes. and why? Because the pressure of the bow on the string changes the tension (and, microscopically, the length) of the string. It's not dissimilar to a guitarist who bends pitch by sliding the string laterally on the fretboard. I suppose that the action of the bow driving ...


1

One factor is proper maintenance of the right hand. The nails become an issue for sure if they are allowed to grow too long. Despite the use of nails on classical guitar they are not usually grown very long. Most books show the nails flush with the ends of the finger or just 1mm beyond. The string is actually plucked from the finger pad and nail together ...


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