7

The front rim of most kick drums is very strong - a rigid metal circle - so standing on it isn't in itself likely to damage the drum. It also won't damage the mic, as it is usually on a low stand in front of the drum. However you are right that there are obviously safety concerns: You could fall backwards into the kit You could fall forwards and fall to ...


6

Normally, you'd need a computer to connect the Yamaha P-105 to, since its USB interface is only of the "to-host" kind, i.e. it needs a USB host, which acts as the controller of the USB connection. Also the computer is needed to interpret the incoming MIDI-over-USB data and route it into your music software or to another MIDI interface attached to your ...


5

I am not a drummer and I'm not affiliated with these folks, so if you down-vote, please tell me why in the comments so that I can improve my answers to this forum. Here's a site that tells you how to build drum shells either ply or stave. You'll have to have some woodworking chops however: http://pdgood.us/drumshed/buildmethods.html A ply drum shell is ...


5

That's actually not a snare drum but a “huge-diaphragm microphone”. This was a gimmick some studio engineers built out of, indeed, a snare drum shell by mounting a subwoofer in it instead of the drum head. (Note that a loudspeaker and a dynamic microphone capsule are by construction basically the same thing, just the latter is normally much smaller, lower ...


3

You can't heal cracks in cymbals, but you can clean them up if they're tarnished. They don't go rusty because they are made from bronze not steel. Don't use steel wool as you will scratch the surface. Instead buy and use a proprietary cymbal cleaner which will remove the tarnish without damaging the surface. Cymbal stands and most other drum hardware are ...


3

I've played with both and never really noticed a difference. As I've never managed to wear out or break either kind (I'm not a heavy metal drummer!) I can't say which lasts longer.


3

The Ghostnote online forum for drum builders is a great resource. You can search for particular topics. Some of the tutorials can only be accessed if you have a paid membership ($20 a year), but I've found lots of good info without it. The pdgood.us site mentioned is also good, but if you search Ghostnote for particular topics of interest you will likely ...


2

I have two pedals with straps and I've only had one strap break on me ever. I find chain drives too stiff and I vastly prefer the feel and responsiveness of a strap pedal.


2

The phrase goes "only one way to find out", and it needs to be treated with caution. Both drums and drum mics come in a large number of varieties and may, or may not, withstand that kind of punishment. It's potentially quite an exciting stunt on stage, but it comes with an element of risk. How willing are you to risk damaging your kick drum? How easily can ...


2

Put simply: A drum is not constructed to hold a 175 lb person. It will not likely collapse, but could certainly go out of round, making it difficult or problematic to tune in the future. That drum is anchored by a couple thin stabilizers that are held by a pressure screw. It may be "rock and roll" to stand on the drumkit...and it's all good for the show, ...


1

For cracks, yes, you can repair them; but for keyholes no. Of course the cymbal will never sound like it did but you can refurbish the cymbal into a smaller one, say a crash cut down to a splash is possible. I have done it, but you have to know what your doing. Here is a link on how to repair cracked cymbals..


1

There are a number of one-off adaptations which allow a street performer to bang a drum, blow a pennywhistle, or do other things based on leg or foot motions. The usual name for such a fellow is "one-man band." For all I know you can buy the mallet control linkage at Amazon these days :-) but the photo sure looks home-brewed.


1

It looks like a marching bass drum worn in the back. Something like this: As you can see, both the image you provided and the one I did, have these straps that hold the bass drum on the person's torso. The pic you provided has that drum strapped in the back. The only difference is that it has some kind of mechanism to be played with the foot (?)


1

If all you've got is USB on your Yamaha, I think you're only gonna be able to connect it to your computer. I could be wrong, but i don't thiiiiink little usb=>midi devices exist. You'll have to google it or wait for someone who knows for sure... So one way around it is to have your midi sequencer on your pc route the yamaha midi to the Alesis.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible