20

If you are serious about drumming I have good advice: Background I've been playing 13 years.I play in my college's jazz ensemble and play in a rock band outside of that. I take lessons with the percussion instructor at my university. I usually practice 3 hours a day. I get paid for some of my gigs, but not enough for me to call myself a professional. ...


15

I've been playing the drums for almost 18 years now, so here's my two cents: This is definitely a matter of preference, and has to do with how you use your foot to strike the bass drum. Generally there are two styles, heel-up and heel-down, and they're pretty much how they sound: Heel up players (generally found in more aggressive styles of music such as ...


11

For your first question. Your cymbal is oxidized, and the green color is called patina Initially, bare Cu metal atoms react with air to form the pink oxide, cuprite, Cu2O, which has Cu+1 cations. This gradually oxidizes further to the black oxide, tenorite, CuO, with Cu+2 ions. The black sulfide CuS also sometimes forms. In the presence of moisture, ...


10

Hit both the cymbals once . The "Crash Cymbal" should produce a loud, sharp "crash" The "Ride Cymbal" should produce a sustained, shimmering sound Sample of Crash Cymbal sound Sample of Ride Cymbal sound


9

The purist, jazz drummer in me will tell you there is no difference. You can place a cymbal wherever you want and play it however you want regardless of what word the manufacturer decided to print on it. You can ride a crash and crash a ride. "Crash" and "ride" are just divisions we've made based on how well they produce certain kinds of sounds. So really ...


8

All teachers bring something to the student that the student cannot get online: experienced observation and training catered to both the strengths and weaknesses particular to the student. Everyone is different. Everyone's bodies and brains work in subtly or seriously different ways. But drums (and guitars and math and Shakespeare) are all pretty much the ...


7

Rudiments are just the different basic sequences. You can play them in any order, but you will find some work well and some sound less good. As with many aspects of music, it comes down to what you think sounds good. It is not random, but depends on what you are trying to do. Your best plan is to listen to drummers you really like and learn their fills and ...


7

The front rim of most kick drums is very strong - a rigid metal circle - so standing on it isn't in itself likely to damage the drum. It also won't damage the mic, as it is usually on a low stand in front of the drum. However you are right that there are obviously safety concerns: You could fall backwards into the kit You could fall forwards and fall to ...


7

To be clear about what we are talking about, this is an electronic drum set: There are other ways to generate sounds that function as drums in a music production, including drum machines and several different kinds of software. This answer will not be about those. For the sake of anyone curious and reading about this who does not know much about electronic ...


7

Here is an example of hi-hat open and close notation: The hats are notated by the x note heads above the top line of the staff. The + above a note indicates playing the closed hi-hat with a stick, and the o above a note head indicates playing an open hi-hat with a stick. If you want the drummer to play the hat with the stick again when closing the hat, you ...


7

This cymbal is an alloy of copper and tin. The green coulor is the a phenomene of the oxidation of copper. It can be cleaned and will disappear by a chemical reduction with hydrogenium. https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Cymbal_alloys the link of wiki says: Cymbal alloys From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [wikipedia page] Cymbals are made from four main ...


6

In the same way you'd compose any other passage of music, but ignore the elements of harmony and melody. Although, as with a lot of sound art or noise composition, you can write something with the 'idea' of melody but without precise pitches. Do you want your fill to ascend in pitch, or descend? Think like this: rhythm: Are there any distinctive rhythms in ...


6

Summary: Ex. 2 is self-contained and unambiguous; however, if you have other ways of communicating your intent to the performer, then the other, less busy, approaches are probably more useful. Ex. 2, the unambiguous one, is required if you're distributing the music "into the wild", i.e. you expect an arbitrary drummer to pick up the score and play it ...


6

One thing I would ask is whether you intend to take formal lessons or experiment yourself. If you are planning on taking formal lessons I would get in touch with a teacher first, for two reasons. Firstly, your teacher may start you off on a practice pad to work on basic technique. A practice pad is invaluable in my opinion and something I still use in my ...


6

Well, LowTom (LT) and HiMidTom (HMT) with the Hands, open hihat (oH) with feet plays either mounted SC or strikes SC thru HMT in one stroke.


6

I would advise against doing so. I expect that you intend to exchange both heads of your drum, to save some money. I've done that, once or twice, because I had to (very bad dent on the batter head, no spare available, and I had to play). First, it supposes that you use the same model head on both sides of you toms, which is often seen but in no way a ...


6

I think you'll find that this is not limited to rock bands. Any time there are seated musicians in more than one row, it is quite likely that the rows in the back will be elevated. This certainly helps with visibility in both directions (so the trombones can't claim they don't see the conductor ) and to some extent also helps with sound projection. You'...


5

I would strongly advise against it. The resonant head is supposed to resonate. If you have beaten your batter head to a point where it should be changed as a batter head, it really means it should be changed. It's beyond the point of optimal resonance and thus using it as a resonant head will not produce a good sound. Batter and resonant heads don't ...


5

Use a practice pad. All the professional drummers I know use one regularly to practise stick technique and rudiments. Also, the drum teachers I know advise their pupils to use practice pad, particularly if they are unable to practise on a full kit.


5

Yes, you absolutely can. As with so many things, this is not a black-or-white thing. There's not some kind of gene that says you'll either be a master at playing the drums, or totally suck at it. Many things come into play here: The ability to concentrate. The ability to control your motions accurately. Eye-hand coordination. Stamina. Willpower. These are ...


5

Well, you say... Knowing myself and how I learn best, viewing random YouTube clips won't help me stick with it. But sticking with it is on you, not the medium you're using for learning. If you don't have the passion for it, you won't do it. If playing drums isn't a passion of your's, no biggie. Move on to something that is. I have no affiliation with ...


5

That's actually not a snare drum but a “huge-diaphragm microphone”. This was a gimmick some studio engineers built out of, indeed, a snare drum shell by mounting a subwoofer in it instead of the drum head. (Note that a loudspeaker and a dynamic microphone capsule are by construction basically the same thing, just the latter is normally much smaller, lower ...


5

This may sound dumb and simple but: a box. Get a real kick pedal, even a cheap one, and set it up to hit something that will make a sound loud enough to hear and quiet enough that you can tolerate it as a parent. Anything hollow with a flat side to hit should work, even a sturdy cardboard box. There are practice pads made specifically for this but they may ...


4

All electronic drum kits even today basically just play back recorded samples with triggers shaped to match traditional drums. No matter how good the samples themselves are, the idea that each hit triggers a specific sample will never sound realistic when the same instrument (especially cymbals) is struck several times while it's still ringing. This is ...


4

This kind of coordination seems impossible at first but then one day it seems like it happens magically. Here are some methods that I have seen help countless students. Please note: my answer draws more on guitar and piano experience than percussion experience. I hope percussionists can propose an edit or provide an answer of their own if they have more to ...


4

Bob Broadley is right if you want to practice ONLY the stick technique : buy a pad. So you will be able to train your touch and etc... which is nice. Now, there are several things you can do if you want to improve your drumming in a more "evolved" way. First of all, buy a bass drum's pedal. This is always a good investment, since you will get used to your ...


4

My band, a three piece rock/techno/metal band, only uses drums from a machine. We did initially use live recorded drums, but for the type of music we play, we needed the rhythm section to have exact precision, to tie in with stage effects or video, for some events. So the entire rhythm section is generated within a DAW, using various tools, and synths and ...


4

Practicing with multi pads is not a bad idea, it's a great idea. You can actually just practice on a cheap, portable, (affordably ship-able) practice pad to learn stick control for rhythmic accuracy, relative dynamics, and hitting a small target (this is important because eventually you'll want to hit a specific point on a drum head to get a certain sound, ...


4

Yes, you can use the multi-voice feature. On each track, you can use up to 4 independent voices : the notes can have different duration and independent stem direction. Each number represent a voice (when selected, the notes on that voice are in black, the others in gray) and the last button displays all voices in black. When you edit / enter notes, it is ...


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