14

It really depends on the style of music. If you're playing military or orchestral music, with lots of rolls, you'll probably find a wooden stick rebounds better from the snare drum, making it easier to play. On the other hand, because wood has a grain, wooden tips give you a slightly different sound depending on the rotation of the stick around its long ...


10

As any material, wood/plastic/carbon fiber will become more and more breakable when they take some damages. You don't only hit the drum with the shaft when you do a rimshot. On cymbals (crash or charleston), you can have differents sounds by hitting with the different parts of the drumstick. If your stick is already weakened, then sometimes even one little ...


8

Rutes. OK, I learned a word today! Hardly a bank-breaking investment. Or you could just play quieter. For several years I had the privilege of playing with Bobby Cook, a highly experienced theatre drummer. The first time I wrote 'brushes' on his part he asked 'Do you WANT brushes, or do you just want it soft? I can do soft with sticks". And he could, ...


6

Hi and welcome to the Music Stack Exchange. To answer your question: will this damage the brushes or my drumheads? Yes - at very least in the sense that any and all contact between sticks (or mallets, brushes, multi-rods) and heads contributes to wear on both, respectively. However, since you are playing softly, you are not likely to significantly damage ...


5

Nylon tips are good sounding on cymbals, therefore you'll want to use it if you do a lot of cymbal sounds. It is also more consistent than of the wooden tips, since wooden tips will sounds bad when it is depreciated. Wooden tips on the other hand sounds better on the toms, that's why many rock and pop drummers prefer it than the nylon tips.


4

You're probably better off getting some rutes, which at least will allow you some bouncability. Not as much as sticks, but more than brushes, extended or not. Which may, as you fear, spoil the drum head eventually - somewhat more expensive. Rutes don't need to cost a lot, and really should be part of any drummer's armoury. The last pair I bought was around ...


4

When it comes to electronic drums, aim for the sticks that feel best for you. While you're not currently using an acoustic drum set, you won't need to worry about the differences in tone between nylon tips, barrel tips, etc. Especially if you're a beginner, you'll just want to find a pair that's most comfortable to you. I use American Classic 5A's when I ...


4

I'm not a drummer but I've talked about this with the drummer in my band a bit. So I have some insight but not enough experience to truly provide full detail or necessarily be able to answer follow up questions, though I will try. Practicing with different stick sizes can be quite useful, typically on the side of practicing with heavier sticks. The ...


4

At every level, there are different schools of thought about technique--and not just about the technique itself, but how much physical technique actually matters. Even within the same group, where you'd expect people to play the same, you'll find wide variance in technique. It might help if you could identify why you're unsatisfied with your technique. Is ...


4

There is a lot of personal preference when it comes to drumsticks. Some of the important factors you will get/have to choose from are: Material (different woods and synthetics) Diameter/weight Tip style (the shape of the tip) Tip material (can be different from the rest of the stick - wood or nylon usually) What I did when I started drumming is I purchased ...


4

At the end of the day its all down to technique and placement. You can always expect to hit the bladed side of cymbals when the swing up and down from hits which acts as an axe to cut through your sticks gradually. If you are playing metal for example that is a lot of hits in a short space of time. Its wood verses metal the sick will lose. The best way to ...


3

Many of the considerations in choosing a drumstick do not apply when playing solely on an electronic set. However, there are a few considerations. First, the most obvious characteristic of drumsticks to most people is the size. You don't have to care about how the size of the stick you choose affects the volume, but it's a good idea to stay with a drumset ...


3

The sound is all personal preference, for me personally after a few years of bouncing back and forth between wood and nylon tip I got to where I didn't care for the nylon tips even on cymbals. Nylon tips are brighter and "pingier" (for lack of a better word) on cymbals and eventually I settled on the darker sound from wood tips. Wood tips are also nice ...


2

The way you do it is called "matched grip" because the hands are the same, and the other way is called "traditional grip". Traditional has been used for centuries for military drumming: Notice the way the drums are tilted--this keeps them from being tripped over, but it would be impossible to play with a matched grip due to the angle. Nowadays some people ...


2

Follow the Two basic ways of holding a drumstick: Traditional Grip Matched Grip Traditional Grip - One thing you need to remember is that the stick has to rest loosely on your hand. You only apply pressure on the stick at it's fulcrum(the thumb-index finger point as in the figure) to keep it from flying out as you play. Matched Grip - Hold your stick ...


1

When you choose a drumstick, you want to take into consideration: 1. The matierial of the drumstick 2. The weight and the thickness of the drumstick 3. The material of the tip 4. The shape of the tip 5. The length of the stick 1. You can get nylon ones, but, these are usually much more expensive and most beginners won't notice a difference between them and ...


1

No you cannot get away with a two finger grip. You have 5 fingers , and you use them all. Try this three finger grip to start, once you feel it you will understand how to use the other 2 fingers to assist things. You mentioned letting the stick move more easily with two fingers, and the others getting in the way. Here's what I suggest you try. For a stick to ...


1

If I understand correctly, you are having trouble keeping your fingers on the sticks? Honestly, there Dvd that has essentially every applicable hand technique for drum-set and it is called Weapons for the modern drummer. This has everything from finger technique to moeller. Basically the idea is that you do not want to let your pinky ever leave the stick ...


1

Plastic tipped sticks will preserve your drums a little better than wood. If you chip the wood it could rip through mesh or cut the rubber. Just don't mix the sticks you use on an acoustic kit with your E-kit sticks and you won't have this problem. Buy a brand new pair of sticks that you like and use those exclusively on your E-kit and nothing else. Vic ...


1

it happens to the best (Here Joe Morello loses it at about 3:30 and you have to actually watch the video to notice). Of course the stick will not stay put: with time you'll learn how to make it creep back to where it belongs. The actual fulcrum the stick rotates around shifts when holding/moving your thumb differently and depending on just how you move ...


1

Drum sticks are basically 'sticks'!!!! Instructing new students in the Art of Stick Fighting, I find that new students most often act as though a 'stick' is a 'club' - They hang on to it like there is no tomorrow and bang it against your stick as hard as they can. After you explain to them that your stick is there to help them, and that there really is no ...


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