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68

Instruments don't just produce one frequency at a time. When you play a single note on a melodic instruments (like piano, wind instruments, string instruments, etc.), you produce many different frequencies at a single time--a whole spectrum is produced. But this spectrum isn't random. It pretty closely follows the harmonic series, which can be thought of as ...


51

The drums CAN play melodies, but the number of pitches and notes you have available are limited by the number of drums you have (not counting creative applications of "bending" the drum head to produce higher pitches). Terry Bozzio is an example of a drummer who uses a massive drumset so that he can play more complex melodies on the drums. In a video of his ...


45

This is not always true. While most bar bands have this set up, if you go to many large concerts (for instance the Eagles concert tour), you will often find many percussionists working simultaneously. But on average, and for most typical bands, I'd say you're correct. And while I can't give a scientific reason, I can give my general opinions and at no ...


43

What you are thinking of as "drums" is really a collection of drums, percussion & cymbals gathered together in such a way as they can be played by one person. A drum kit or trap kit. This idea came about initially at the end of the US civil war. Until then, marching bands had always been on the move - one drum per drummer was the standard setup. ...


31

It reduces volume, but usually the desired effect is to remove excessive ringing. If you listen to the snare on the St. Anger record by Metallica, you'll hear the type of sounds some drummers want to mitigate with the use of tape or other dampers. This technique can be used on toms too. There it's usually not the high pitched ring of the snare, but lower ...


29

Classical music did use drums: timpani and bass drum for starters. ...I'm talking where the rhythm is one of the main driving forces Rhythm IS a driving force in classical music. I think what you mean is a combination of: why didn't classical music use constant, repeated, dance patterns? and why didn't classical music use percussion throughout the ...


25

At the risk of covering something you may already know well, let's take a detour and be clear about what crash and ride cymbals are and how they are different. Then the explanation of what a crash/ride is will make more sense. There are three main characteristics that determine most of a cymbal's sound: size (diameter), weight (thickness), and profile (the ...


25

If you are serious about drumming I have good advice: Background I've been playing 13 years.I play in my college's jazz ensemble and play in a rock band outside of that. I take lessons with the percussion instructor at my university. I usually practice 3 hours a day. I get paid for some of my gigs, but not enough for me to call myself a professional. ...


25

The relative dearth of percussion in classical music versus rock is part of what makes those genres sound different. Nothing takes on the role of a drum kit in the classical orchestra. That role remains empty and that’s part of the sound. When a more percussive sound is desired in the classical orchestra, then percussion instruments are used. These include ...


22

No-one's mentioned pans - aka steel drums They certainly are used to play melodies. The main problem is that melodies usually contain long and short duration notes, and drums generally can only produce short, so rolls have to be performed to 'sustain' longer notes. For those who haven't had the pleasure, 40 gallon steel oil drums are cut in half, or less, ...


22

A drum is usually considered a non-pitched instrument because it produces a weak fundamental frequency, produces inharmonic overtones, and the pitches it does produce are unrelated to the rest of the ensemble. Certain drums can take on more pitch-like qualities by modifying some of these parameters. A plucked string, for example, has a very strong ...


21

I don't see why you wouldn't be able to achieve all of your goals within a year - they are a perfectly reasonable. 1.5hrs of practice a day is a typical average of many college musicians, but I digress. Let me address your questions directly: Is it possible, within my barriers, to achieve my goals? What would a weekday excercise (1.5 hours) look ...


21

I'll add pictures to precise the answer of Meaningful Username ;) This is more for sound mitigation : This is more for tone control (to reduce some harmonies) : Since this answer is appreciated, I'll add that some drummers prefer (and advise) to use gaffer instead of duct tape to avoid adhesive residues. Duct tape uses natural adhesive where gaffer tape ...


21

You should do both! When I just start working with other musicians, I like to get a cover or two under our belts so we can feel each other out and learn to play as a group. Literally at the same time, I like to meet for songwriting sessions to start putting stuff together for originals. Both covers and originals will improve your skills, but perhaps in ...


19

In general "classical" music usually has less of a "strict time" feeling than music that typically uses percussion heavily. That's one reason that a conductor is there - to define the time feel, cue sections and so on. But when a composer wants to make the listener aware of strict time, they can and do use percussion - something like Ravel's Bolero being an ...


16

Drums have pitches, but by the time they are in the track, then unless it is for very specific purposes, to complement a melodic line etc, then those actual pitches should not be truly apparent to the end-listener. Let the listener just get the 'vibe' of what you intend. They shouldn't really be hearing a 'tune' from the drum pitches, only the apparent ...


15

Well, the problem is that as you practice, your subconscious mechanism picks up repeated tasks. If you are still "fully present" (I'd call it "trying hard") once your subconscious develops capability, you end up with two brain systems struggling for control of the muscles of the body. You can see this clearly when you start learning a ...


14

You're close! A paradiddle is a four-articulation pattern that alternates hands for the first three articulations but then repeats the third hand. The two patterns are L R L L and R L R R. Fancier terminology would be "alternating single strokes followed by a double stroke." I don't know where the name comes from, but I've just always assumed it was "...


13

You are missing independent coordination between your limbs. Your brain has not yet developed neurological connections that supports such kinesthetic interdependence as it is something that takes time to do - some of us longer than others. In order to develop strict and evenly developed competence with all of your limbs, it therefore stands to reason that ...


13

Yes, there are several things that are different: You'll find out that a real drum and a real cymbal produce much more variants in sound than the electronic version, depending on many parameters of your stroke (where you hit, how hard you hit, what kind of stick you have, how tight you hold the stick). It is a challenge, but also a possibility. You cannot ...


12

I agree 100% with everything Todd Wilcox stated in his excellent answer! To add to what he said - as a songwriter myself, I find that learning covers is a great way to improve not only my skills as a musician, but also my skills as a songwriter. First of all, when I write my own songs and musical arrangements, I tend to use chords and riffs that I am ...


12

Sites like this always get lots of questions about how to soundproof thin walls, and the answer is always that you can't do much. Soundproofing is achieved by having a lot of mass in the walls (and those foam panels you see in studios are about diffusing reflections, not soundproofing). So this means that you need to look for a house/apartment that's been ...


12

In contrast to the question, the timpani are a drum set that can play melodies (although they are almost always given accompaniment parts only). Indeed, they are tuned to pitches (one pitch per drum) before a piece starts.


12

For your first question. Your cymbal is oxidized, and the green color is called patina Initially, bare Cu metal atoms react with air to form the pink oxide, cuprite, Cu2O, which has Cu+1 cations. This gradually oxidizes further to the black oxide, tenorite, CuO, with Cu+2 ions. The black sulfide CuS also sometimes forms. In the presence of moisture, ...


12

It's a tough situation. Even if you're able to stubbornly stay right on the beat, it will sound like you're dragging or something is wrong. If you go with the flow, the whole group will speed up or slow down uncontrollably, and it will sound bad. The only real solution is to get everyone in the band to play well in time. This requires lots of individual ...


12

The main role of a Bass is going to be different depending on the style. My answer is going to relate to Pop/rock. Rhythm: The Bass guitar is part of the rhythm section. Obviously the drums are also part of the rhythm section so the two are going to be tightly coupled. But that doesn't mean the drums and bass are locked together. It is common for the bass ...


11

I'm not a drummer, but from what I've read... closed hihat is hitting it with the stick while your foot holds it closed. foot hihat is stomping the pedal so the top and bottom crash together.


11

As any material, wood/plastic/carbon fiber will become more and more breakable when they take some damages. You don't only hit the drum with the shaft when you do a rimshot. On cymbals (crash or charleston), you can have differents sounds by hitting with the different parts of the drumstick. If your stick is already weakened, then sometimes even one little ...


11

It's called "choking" or "cymbal choke". Another name for it is "muting". Unfortunately that term is overloaded since it also means putting materials on cymbals to make them sound quieter for practice or just to make them less intense. Even if the drummer is holding the cymbal before or during, I'd say choke is still the best word. If your drummer got a ...


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