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8

Rutes. OK, I learned a word today! Hardly a bank-breaking investment. Or you could just play quieter. For several years I had the privilege of playing with Bobby Cook, a highly experienced theatre drummer. The first time I wrote 'brushes' on his part he asked 'Do you WANT brushes, or do you just want it soft? I can do soft with sticks". And he could, ...


6

Hi and welcome to the Music Stack Exchange. To answer your question: will this damage the brushes or my drumheads? Yes - at very least in the sense that any and all contact between sticks (or mallets, brushes, multi-rods) and heads contributes to wear on both, respectively. However, since you are playing softly, you are not likely to significantly damage ...


6

There is a wise old bass-player who has a theory about what he calls 'the time-pool': a sort of fund into which everyone has to pay. The drummer is a constant donor, and after him the bassist is usually the most generous, but every member of the band needs to contribute something to it every so often. The guitarist for example can play a few notes or lines ...


5

Rather than just playing through pieces at your practices, why not spend some time doing some rhythmic exercises as a band? I don't think any decent player would turn down the opportunity to play better, or to learn new techniques, so if you can't convince your bandmates that this is a good idea this should ring alarm bells. In fact, the decent players ...


4

You're probably better off getting some rutes, which at least will allow you some bouncability. Not as much as sticks, but more than brushes, extended or not. Which may, as you fear, spoil the drum head eventually - somewhat more expensive. Rutes don't need to cost a lot, and really should be part of any drummer's armoury. The last pair I bought was around ...


4

If the music is heavily groove-based, you (and the bass player) are responsible for the groove. Not all music IS heavily groove-based... And it's not unusual to take a subtly different tempo for verse and chorus, or for a final chorus. But yes, poor time-keeping rather than deliberate variation IS often a problem. And the player responsible will often ...


4

Rudiments are compared to scales in the way that scales are an exercise for warming up your fingers, working on speed or getting certain motions in to your hands/fingers. They can be used in the same way, as warmups, as speed exercises and to get certain aspects of technique down. Just like you might hear a scale run in a song or a partial scale run in a ...


3

Time is a funny thing. Metronome time is not always what a musical situation demands, but it's a pretty good start point, and every competent musician should be able to do play reasonably against one. That said, there are plenty of examples of great records where the end BPM is different (usually a bit faster) than the start. For instance, some of the Isley ...


3

Drum rudiments are really more about the technique of playing. How to stick. Scales can't really be seen in the same way. Rudiments came about as the building blocks of play - mainly if not exclusively on snare. Since drum playing is simpler than piano, for instance, given that with piano it's not only the duration (rhythm) but specific notes at the same ...


2

If you're fairly loose with the terminology, all common rock and pop songs are made up of only rudiments. You could look at practically every simple beat as combinations of unisons and one-handed rolls. Simple fills are often just single stroke rolls incorporating broken sixteenth notes and similar concepts covered by practically every book on rudiments. ...


2

I would say the Wiki definition is incorrect in that it describes the snare position as an "upbeat." It's a downbeat, which means it's on one of the four beats to the bar (in 4/4 time). An upbeat can be anything not on one of the four, but it's subjective: In a 16-division bar, one could say divisions 1, 5, 9 and 13 are "down" and everything else is "up." Or ...


1

the answer to your question, I'm a bass player btw, is to absolutely keep time always. Other people, like me, depend on you to do that. Make sure you're in the right, of course. I have a firm on eye on the bass drum. If youre trying to adjust to another person, then everyone else will assume they are wrong and wander too. Record yourself and them playing ...


1

I tend to follow the melody of the voice or the solo instrument, and this gets me out of balance. Maybe that you are the root of the problem. You don’t have to follow the soloists, they have to follow you. When you try to play in time with them everything may fall apart. If the bass and percussion (or even only a rhytm-keyboard) try to follow the singer (...


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