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4

This is the basic element of any 'four on the floor' rhythm [though more usually with hi-hat rather than ride]. boom-tsh-thwack-tsh-boom-tsh-thwack-tsh-… Kick on the one & three, snare and kick on the two & four. Hats or ride playing 8s. Not a problem at all to hit these three together.


4

James Brown's drummers are considered some of the best of all time, and they definitely hit the kick and snare and ride at the same time occasionally. The main drum riff for the verses of "Superbad" (played by Jabo Starks) has kick and snare simultaneously at the first beat of every measure. And check out the bridge (1:30) with kick, snare, and ...


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It seems that you're asking how music without direct rhythm instruments (like drums as the most basic example) ends up still sounding with a specific time signature and beats. If not I'll re-answer but I'll do my best to explain how rhythm is indicated with just pitched notes. TL;DR you can repeat notes/chords which basically acts like a drum, or you can use ...


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A good performer should be able to make almost any sequence of notes sound in almost any metre. They will do this by emphasizing key beats in some way, with subtle (or, if they're forcing something far outside its "natural" metre, not-so-subtle) variations in volume and/or intonation.


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If the piece is a vocal, the stress pattern of the lyrics generally indicates the rhythm. There some options as to the number of unstressed syllables between stressed syllables. For example, dactyls can be represented by a long note and two short or an accented note and two unaccented or something similar. A choice may be chosen based on tradition (makes ...


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It totally depends on the mood you're going for, and honestly I'd say deciding a time signature, a key, a melody, and a concept are all things that are a part of your decision when composing a piece of your own and there shouldn't really be an answer. That being said, here's my personal tip: start with trying to find a basic melody, or at least a subject / ...


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The main point of time signatures is that they compartmentalise the rhythm of a piece. Often, a piece can be 'written' without the 'composer' even considering what the time signature might be. It's when it actually gets written down as music that it becomes important, academically.That's when the emphases are notated. If there's a pulse that gets repeated ...


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One simple way is to simply play notes/sounds with a different velocity/volume. If you take a single note and play it at regular intervals, but in a pattern: Loud - soft - medium - soft - Loud - soft - medium - soft - Loud - soft - medium - soft etc... you'll have created a rhythmic feel. As well as volume, you can also alter timbre of the note, or how much ...


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I don't know of a specific term for "absence of percussion music", but there certainly are some genres which are known to avoid the use of percussive instruments and of any pronouced beat, in very different styles. Try ambient music, a genre I believe was created or at least much codified by Brian Eno's album "ambient music for airports" ...


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