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10

The main role of a Bass is going to be different depending on the style. My answer is going to relate to Pop/rock. Rhythm: The Bass guitar is part of the rhythm section. Obviously the drums are also part of the rhythm section so the two are going to be tightly coupled. But that doesn't mean the drums and bass are locked together. It is common for the bass ...


9

I think when an instrument doesn't have a clear pitch, the musician's go-to word is 'unpitched', rather than 'noise'. Noise in a musical context often refers to something extraneous or unwanted - e.g. when talking about fret noise, or a noisy amp. However, you are quite right that the sound of many drums is essentially very like 'enveloped noise' - and from ...


8

Certainly not the main role! It's going to depend a lot on the style of music played. In a couple of bands I work in, there are what I call 'listening drummers'. Not every band is lucky enough to have one!When I'm on bass, we listen to each other and complement what's happening. Yes, sometimes the bass adds pitch to the kick drum, others, I play on some but ...


4

I think a flam is what you play, and a grace note is how it’s written in notation. Or, as I read on a drumming web page, the first, quieter part of a flam can be called ”grace note”. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_note What a grace note means, depends on the instrument and culture. For drums a note preceded by a grace note means flam. On other ...


4

I think the point is just that when the bass guitar part and kick drum coincide rhythmically the rhythm section likes to get those points as "tight" as possible. Tight being perfectly synchronized. When it's tight both parts reinforce each other. The bass gets a percussive kick and the drum gets pitch. Of course the bass and kick drum aren't always ...


4

I was taught the bass guitar acts as a kind of glue between the rhythm of the drums and the instruments playing actual notes. I understood that as the bass guitar being a part playing notes and a part playing rhythm, covering the gap between vocals and guitar and other instruments and the drums. So I don't think the main role is to give pitch, but it is ...


4

Yes, in your clip the bass drum dominates doesn't it! But I still think the music would make more sense without the drums than without the bass guitar. It has much more musical function than just supporting the drums.


3

Confessing to never having used them! However - several 'advantages'. Replaceable parts - the sleeves and tips are replaceable, meaning they will effectively pay for themselves better over time than having to replace complete wooden sticks. And they won't break as easily! They flex more than wooden sticks, and return quicker, too, meaning they're ...


3

I think it would be misleading to call it the main role of the bass guitar. In most genres, the bass is busier than the kick drum. Having the bass playing on the same beats as the kick drum would often mean that the bass would sound very slow, making the piece as a whole feel ponderous or slow. I feel that this is the case in your example. In many genres,...


2

As so often, there's no tidy yes/no answer to your question, but it's interesting to consider the various ways a musician might use the term 'noise'. 'Noise' might mean random sound. Or a definitely UN-random mix of frequencies such White Noise or Pink Noise. Or a randomisation of digital values applied as 'dithering'. Or simply unwanted sound. There's ...


2

No, the main role of the bass is not to give pitch to the kick drum. Neither is the main role of the kick to provide weight to the bass. Typically the role of both drums and bass is to provide a foundation for the rest of the song and they do this by working together as a rhythm section. The linked video section is a fantastic example of the two ...


2

It's basically the same idea. A flam is two notes: a grace note followed by a normal stroke. So only that first little note of semi-indeterminate duration is the grace note, not the whole two-note phrase.


1

I would recommend find a balance of studying technique and playing. Perhaps 50%/50%. For technique, learn about stick gripping like the french and german. See this blog post on paradiddles using the french grip. Another great technique to look into is the Moeller technique. In terms of playing. Play along to your favourite songs. Have fun with it. You ...


1

Custom moulded IEMs provide ~30 dB of attenuation, so a bit more than the Vicfirth. The problem with non-custom IEMs is that they sit right on the end of the ear canal, so (depending on the geometry of your ears) they easily slip out and/or don't seal completely. After years of fiddling with standard IEMs, I went to custom moulded IEMs and I never want to go ...


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