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38

What you are thinking of as "drums" is really a collection of drums, percussion & cymbals gathered together in such a way as they can be played by one person. A drum kit or trap kit. This idea came about initially at the end of the US civil war. Until then, marching bands had always been on the move - one drum per drummer was the standard setup. ...


25

The relative dearth of percussion in classical music versus rock is part of what makes those genres sound different. Nothing takes on the role of a drum kit in the classical orchestra. That role remains empty and that’s part of the sound. When a more percussive sound is desired in the classical orchestra, then percussion instruments are used. These include ...


23

Classical music did use drums: timpani and bass drum for starters. ...I'm talking where the rhythm is one of the main driving forces Rhythm IS a driving force in classical music. I think what you mean is a combination of: why didn't classical music use constant, repeated, dance patterns? and why didn't classical music use percussion throughout the ...


18

In general "classical" music usually has less of a "strict time" feeling than music that typically uses percussion heavily. That's one reason that a conductor is there - to define the time feel, cue sections and so on. But when a composer wants to make the listener aware of strict time, they can and do use percussion - something like Ravel's Bolero being an ...


14

There's always been popular rhythm-based music that used drums and 'art music' that didn't so much. Here's some pre-classical music.


12

It's a tough situation. Even if you're able to stubbornly stay right on the beat, it will sound like you're dragging or something is wrong. If you go with the flow, the whole group will speed up or slow down uncontrollably, and it will sound bad. The only real solution is to get everyone in the band to play well in time. This requires lots of individual ...


11

The main role of a Bass is going to be different depending on the style. My answer is going to relate to Pop/rock. Rhythm: The Bass guitar is part of the rhythm section. Obviously the drums are also part of the rhythm section so the two are going to be tightly coupled. But that doesn't mean the drums and bass are locked together. It is common for the bass ...


9

Certainly not the main role! It's going to depend a lot on the style of music played. In a couple of bands I work in, there are what I call 'listening drummers'. Not every band is lucky enough to have one!When I'm on bass, we listen to each other and complement what's happening. Yes, sometimes the bass adds pitch to the kick drum, others, I play on some but ...


9

I think when an instrument doesn't have a clear pitch, the musician's go-to word is 'unpitched', rather than 'noise'. Noise in a musical context often refers to something extraneous or unwanted - e.g. when talking about fret noise, or a noisy amp. However, you are quite right that the sound of many drums is essentially very like 'enveloped noise' - and from ...


8

Every instrument provides rhythm. Every sound you make has a rhythm, unless it has an extremely slow attack. Even chord changes have a rhythmic impact, and the timing of harmonic changes is felt in relation to everything else that's happening in the music. It seems to be a common misconception that a drummer makes the groove and all other players are free to ...


8

Rutes. OK, I learned a word today! Hardly a bank-breaking investment. Or you could just play quieter. For several years I had the privilege of playing with Bobby Cook, a highly experienced theatre drummer. The first time I wrote 'brushes' on his part he asked 'Do you WANT brushes, or do you just want it soft? I can do soft with sticks". And he could, ...


7

I’m sorry you don’t find “spoons, washboards, and flatfoot dancing” an acceptable answer. I would invite you to consider that spoons, washboards, and feet all feature some things in common that drums do not—they’re inexpensive, they don’t take up much space, they’re very portable, and they’re ubiquitous—every household, even in impoverished Appalachia, had ...


7

The problem is that the mixer is fully monaural (mono) and your headphones are stereo. Your mixer’s output is not designed to work with headphones. A TRS cable connecting the drum module to the mixer will not help because the mixer will only see mono. The quickest, easiest way to play along to music on your iPhone is to plug the iPhone into the drum module'...


7

There is a wise old bass-player who has a theory about what he calls 'the time-pool': a sort of fund into which everyone has to pay. The drummer is a constant donor, and after him the bassist is usually the most generous, but every member of the band needs to contribute something to it every so often. The guitarist for example can play a few notes or lines ...


6

My first thought is do it the way that is most comfortable to you. However, It can't hurt to learn it every way you can think of. Reason being it will help you down the line when some odd rhythm is put in front of you. Practicing it different ways will help you be more versatile if you really work at it or it will allow you to find some weak spots in ...


6

So the bass instruments (double bass, cello, etc) provide the rhythmic component to the song? In most classical music with a tune and a harmonic accompaniment the bass instruments play the root notes and change of 4th on-beat, while the the middle voices are playing the off-beat rhythm to the melody played by the smaller instruments. So it is correct to ...


6

The hi-hat is closed (and not hit with a stick - else there'd be a note!) on the first 8th, open (and hit) on the second, etc. There's some ambiguity whether we should hear a pedal hi-hat note on the main beats. If we DID want to hear 'chink tizz chink tizz...' it could have been notated as below. (We don't need the + articulations - after all there's no ...


6

Hi and welcome to the Music Stack Exchange. To answer your question: will this damage the brushes or my drumheads? Yes - at very least in the sense that any and all contact between sticks (or mallets, brushes, multi-rods) and heads contributes to wear on both, respectively. However, since you are playing softly, you are not likely to significantly damage ...


5

All said and done, a drummer should be able to lead with either hand. Rolling across toms, for instance, on a r.h. kit, is far easier for a r.h. drummer - or one who can lead with r.h. Vice versa for l.h. of course. The open/close is a different situation. If you are never going to play on another kit (probably r.h.) then there's no problem setting up l.h. ...


5

That seems like the standard set up for a drumkit these days. Bottom left is snare, top two tomtoms are mounted on kick, and floor tomtom bottom right, appropriately sitting on the floor. Just about every drumkit that's seen in bands will have a set up very similar, and it's set up for a drummer playing right-handed - but not necessarily a right-handed ...


5

Drummer's no. 1 job is to keep in time. Everything else apart. It's virtually impossible (in my experience) for just the drummer to bring an errant player back into tempo by himself. By enlisting the help of just one more player, it becomes feasible. The bass or rhythm player are the best candidates, as they're responsible for keeping time too. So try ...


5

Rather than just playing through pieces at your practices, why not spend some time doing some rhythmic exercises as a band? I don't think any decent player would turn down the opportunity to play better, or to learn new techniques, so if you can't convince your bandmates that this is a good idea this should ring alarm bells. In fact, the decent players ...


5

Rudiments are compared to scales in the way that scales are an exercise for warming up your fingers, working on speed or getting certain motions in to your hands/fingers. They can be used in the same way, as warmups, as speed exercises and to get certain aspects of technique down. Just like you might hear a scale run in a song or a partial scale run in a ...


5

Your post hints at a common misconception: that Classical music is "old music" and Popular music is "new music". Both traditions go way back, and continue to this day. The definitions are sometimes contentious, but to get started, here's what Wikipedia has to say: Art music: Art music (alternatively called classical music, cultivated music, serious ...


4

I’ve been playing the drums for roughly 14 years now, and can remember that when I was first being taught, my instructor told me to sit down on his kit, which was set up for right handed players, and to get into a position that feels most comfortable. Being left handed, I naturally got into the open handed position. We set up the ride cymbal on the left side ...


4

Sample libraries exist [hundreds of them], but though they all are licensed so you can use them in your own compositions for commercial use, I doubt whether any of them would permit re-use inside what is essentially another application. You'd have to ask the authors very specifically about that. It may be different if this JavaScript app is essentially just ...


4

Consumer audio products like the "sound bars" you mentioned are made for applications where precise timing is less important. Whether there's a 2.5 ms or a 25 ms delay between the input and the output isn't really important for music playback or even TV. These products often combine analog and digital audio sources, and the easiest way to add e.g. ...


4

I think a good practical rule of thumb is to... use your dominant foot as much as possible, including syncopated patterns, and, avoid using your non-dominant foot on strong beats. So, personally, I would play them like this: 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + R R RL R R LRLR R R R R R RLRL|R R R R R R Why? Because your dominant foot is already ...


4

Like the commenters, my money is on your tongue drum being tuned to the pentatonic scale. To answer your very final question, yes - there is theory behind why the pentatonic scale sounds so "universally good" and why it is generally 'easy' to utilize and play against melodically and harmonically... A major pentatonic scale has an absence of tritone due to ...


4

It's not clear exactly what genres (the phrase "modern music" isn't very precise) you're asking about, so I'll cover several of them: Rock, Hard Rock, Punk, Country: More often real acoustic drums played by a drummer and recorded. Sometimes drum replacement may be used if one or more of the drum sounds is off or has a problem - that's where the acoustic ...


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