New answers tagged

2

All live, I guess? If you can only lay one track down first, drums is good.That sets the tempo (with a good drummer!) Drum breaks can always be overdubbed. Then the rest of the rhythm section - guitar (rhythm) and bass - any order.Assuming the drummer can play to a click track, it's worth including one. If not, and the drummer fluctuates, on what may ...


2

If it's a rhythm-based song, lay down the rhythm section, drums, bass, enough piano or guitar to enable the lead singer. Maybe a guide instrumental track of the melody to give the singer something to latch on to. All these tracks can be replaced later if needed, but get the groove right - everyone else's performance will need to fit with it. Then the ...


1

I used to have exactly the same problem. In my case, one of the reasons was that my left hand do tend to slightly rotate inward - almost unnoticeably but enough to affect the stick rebound. Sadly there was no particular exercise to correct this but the obvious: Practice slow and focused, and practice also full strokes without finger control. Focus on ...


0

Let's face it, it could be (and should be) either.You have two pedals, two beaters, and two feet. As a leftie playing a right-handed kit, your right foot will probably, over time, become your 'more controllable' as far as kick is concerned. So, keeping the right foot as the main beat, your left foot will put in any extra kick drum parts. However, as at the ...


1

That feature is available on the EXS24 sample editor in Logic Pro but I’m almost certain you can’t do it in GarageBand. GarageBand does have many pre programmed drum kits though.


0

Disclaimer: I'm neither a drummer, nor do I play very much metal Don't make it a habit to always connect the same foot with the snare. Good metal drummers have a high degree of independence between hands and feet, basically they can switch the pattern of feet around at will as long as fast sequential beats alternate both pedals. That said, the “default” ...


2

Use whatever the studio has. Use their engineer to set it up. If they already have a studio kit, consider using that instead.* Their engineer will be very familiar with it. The time to be learning how to mic up a large drum kit in a room you don't know with mics you don't know is not now. You will not get it right in a week, maybe not even a month. It ...


2

It's a much simpler job to tune a drum which has one head. Timps are such. One head will produce one pitch (plus the complex overtones) when it's stretched regularly. When it's uneven, it'll try to produce several different pitches, resulting in a bit of a mess. Rototoms are similar, with just the one head. I don't think they'd do the job with two. The ...


0

Some physical differences that result in a distinct pitch of an instrument may include but are not limited to, size of the drum, tightness of the drum, the type of material of the drum, etc. I hope that helps. 【Andrew B】


Top 50 recent answers are included