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1

I don't mean ear training - naming intervals, or playing back melodic phrases by ear. I mean - becoming better at noticing when you are perhaps 20 or 30 cents out on a note. For instance if I play certain octave intervals on saxophone they do tend to be slightly wide. It is all to easy to get used to that. I am interested in how to become more aware of it. ...


2

I concur with the other answers that you are looking for movable system ear training, even if all you want is to improve your internal tuner. As Richard pointed out, a movable system teaches you the function of each note within the context of the scale. Once you have a feeling for this function, you will have a much easier time recognizing when you are not ...


3

I agree with Richard learning and training solfege (movable do re mi) practicing all scales and modes and intervals from the same tone. But there is another training that was the greatest benefit to me: By trying to play or notate melodies, tunes of well known songs, and controlling my writing with an instrument. Later you can continue with your own ...


6

The absolute best exercise to train your relative pitch is to sing music on some kind of movable system. This is because movable systems—like movable do and scale-degree numbers—teach you the function of what you're singing, which is ultimately exactly what relative pitch is. (Fixed systems, like fixed do, do not teach function, which is why I believe it's ...


-1

Transcribing as ear training It seems a bit putting the cart in front of the horse. You cannot transcribe if you can't identify pitches - chords and scales, etc. Don't misunderstand me. Transcribing is a great exercise! But I think it benefits from first establishing some base level of ear training. If you don't have that base established already, then ...


0

Transcribing is one piece in the puzzle, one tool and one aspect of learning music. But it's not either/or, you should learn to play by ear what you hear straight away as well, without writing it down first. Sometimes if you think you heard it right, if you slow it down and spend time transcribing it, you may realize that you heard it wrong the first time. ...


0

I kind of have the same thing! Except I don't fumble and I don't need to have heard the song recently, I can sing a song I heard like 5+ years ago in the correct key without skipping a beat. But I can't name the pitch, so I feel like it's not perfect pitch. For instance, if someone played me an A on a piano I almost always would guess the note wrong. If i ...


3

Transcribing is one of the best ways to learn music. It teaches ear training and how to identify technique for particular instruments. It also challenges you to separate different sources in one recording. When I was young we used to transcribe fast riffs by slowing down the spin rate of an LP (vinyl record player). The pitch will drop but you car ...


1

I suspect that the answer is simply this: when you use good speakers your brain receives a lot more information, more details, and therefore it has to work harder at filtering out what you don't need and just focus on following the melody line you are trying to transcribe. I would also guess that with more practice it will cease to make much of a difference,...


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