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1

There is a lot of good advice here already. I have one piece to add: keep sight of the "big picture." Often we can tie ourselves in knots as we try to hyper-analyze small details of chords and progressions, but if we've already identified the broad outlines of where the music is going, we can more easily explain the minute details. To use an ...


1

Let's stick with, for now, the 6 main chords used diatonically. I, ii, iii, IV, V and vi - omitting the not-so-common viio. Establishing the I is the most important start, and we're looking for the chord that sounds like the piece has come 'home' - to a place where it could end satisfactorally. Back to the start of the piece - which most often is I. Contnue ...


1

Muscle memory. The way I found to build it fast is get an isolated vocal track, import into audio software, and reproduce it a line at compare it to the isolated vocal. I find it's harder to figure out the phonetics than to hit the right notes ... singing "Yesterday" as 'Yis-ti-day' for example.


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We are not computers. We don’t need to convert everything to names or numbers to memorize it. My 4y old niece can recite a few songs and a New Years poem, but doesn’t know a thing about the alfabet. So to reproduce a melody you need a couple of things: listen to the melody many times to memorize it learn to listen to yourself while singing practice your ...


1

When those people say, "We learn by repetition and memorizing the sound of the melody, we don't think about intervals or relative pitch or anything.", it's quite possible they're learning the song from the recording in their head. Think an earworm except you purposefully embed the song in your head instead of inadvertently doing so. If those people ...


1

When singing, you do indeed "hear" the music inside your head. But when learning to sing, just like when you're learning to draw, this isn't a fixed sequence: you try, listen, correct, and try again. A tuned piano nearby can help a lot to check whether you hit the note correctly. If you're learning to sing from sheet music a melody you've never ...


5

The answers you have are correct. There is no magic pill, you need to practice singing vocal exercises on the diatonic scale and that will tune your head. There is more than "hearing" the note, you also need to feel the right feelings in your body, the correct core muscle support, breathing, and resonance in your head. This needs work. I ...


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