48

The ukulele has a reputation as an easy instrument because it is an excellent entry level instrument, especially for children. It's small, which makes it easier to hold. It's small, which makes jumps and stretches on the fretboard easier The short, nylon strings make it easy to hold down a string without pain It only has four strings, which makes chords ...


27

Heinrich Schenker was born in 1868 and died in 1935. And unfortunately, it's probably something of a blessing that he died when he did: as a Jew living in Austria in the 1930s, he only just missed the annexation of Austria (1938) and the subsequent horrors that that brought. Schenker's wife, for instance, died in Theresienstadt (a "hybrid concentration ...


21

The piano is very useful when teaching theory and music notation for a few different reasons. Let's look a picture of how notes and the pianos keys relate: From a notation perspective we can see that: The white keys and the naturally named notes line up perfectly so teaching them as distinct ideas won't be a problem. You get exposed to both the treble and ...


20

Look at it this way -- the entirety of your story could have been about being taught, becoming bored with, and eventually learning and exploring maths. But (western) society has these preconceived notions about math supposedly being technical and boring, and music supposedly being expressive and fun. In reality, the best teachers would teach both subjects in ...


15

Self-Answer: The ukulele has this rap as being inferior mostly because almost all people who "learn to play ukulele" never get much more advanced than learning how to strum a few basic chords, then sing using that minimal playing as accompaniment. Other instruments have this problem (the guitar arguably still does to a lesser degree), but the ...


8

All teachers bring something to the student that the student cannot get online: experienced observation and training catered to both the strengths and weaknesses particular to the student. Everyone is different. Everyone's bodies and brains work in subtly or seriously different ways. But drums (and guitars and math and Shakespeare) are all pretty much the ...


8

Essentially, because it IS an easy instrument to play, as far as technique goes. The ukulele and recorder can certainly be entry-level instruments (bit unfair to class them with kazoo I think!) They're cheap, and basic technique is easily achieved. But 'rejection of formal music education'? Recorder is taught in schools with the express purpose of ...


7

In that age it is most important, that your child has fun playing the piece, so it will actually like to play it. There is no special value in the "original" version for a child, and pieces come in lots of variants (instrumentation, transposition, arrangement, ...). I would more expect, that after some time having made technical progress the child will be ...


7

I'm a cellist and I have been parent coach for Suzuki viola. I don't have specific experience with this, but will use my imagination. Let's renumber the fingers. What used to be "2" will now be "1" and so on. Your student will be working with fingers 1, 2 and 3. Think of a beginning student who doesn't use the fourth finger yet. Now, let's think about ...


6

I understand what you are saying. I have known so many folks who have a similar story without the happy ending (perhaps they had the same teachers as you ha ha). They took years of very technical strict lessons learning what the creators of the curriculum thought were important, and became burned out on playing their instrument. It became too much like ...


6

I like to think one can compose music, songs, jingles, etc. without "formal" training, but ... There is so much to each of the arts that it takes a mysterious and marvelous mental and emotional facilities to produce a decent creation (that has anything extra above the commonplace work) in any art. This includes music. There is always a possibility ...


5

The actual major is called Music Therapy. It is very real. I must say, it is not as common as other music majors, such as education, theory / composition, musical theatre, jazz, or performance, but it is steadily gaining traction. If you can play an instrument, you can be a music therapist. From what I've seen they are usually pianists or guitarists, but ...


5

When I was thinking about applying for graduate school, I asked my teacher at the time, who was Ivy-league educated, "Please be honest, does it really matter where I go to school; does anybody actually care?" My professor smiled at me and said, "I'll put it this way: no matter where people went to school or currently teach, we all see each other at the same ...


5

When I started studying music, I thought my instructor was going to teach me everything I wanted to know about music. My lessons were once a week for thirty minutes and I practiced each day to prepare for my next lesson. Things progressed nicely and I thought I was on the right track, but then I started to realize there were holes in my learning. My solution ...


4

I came from an ancient-style rudimental background, and in college had to learn to play set in about two weeks. Obviously, there was no set in my dormroom, so most of learning independence happened away from the instrument. I would suggest a two-pronged approach, since just a pad really isn't the same as set, but a set without hands is almost as bad. Learn ...


4

No, they are not always standarized. I live in Greece and we have a different system here. We have 3 or 4 grades (people usually skip the 1st grade, unless they are really young), and they are: Preliminary Starter Intermediate Advanced (These might not be 100% correct names, but this is how I translated them) I have met other people here in Greece who ...


4

Compared with what? Orchestras are relatively rarer, primarily because fewer kids are encouraged to take up string instruments than wind instruments -- and because a school band can handle a near-arbitrary number players in each section, while an orchestra will only use a few winds and brass players. Nearly every high school I know of (Eastern USA) has a ...


4

I don't think this is restricted to The USA and this form of musical education has many pluses. The band culture requires each musician to behave in an cooperative fashion. While there are rules-and-regulations, the fundamental structure is based on the individual self-discipline contributed to achieve the group’s goals. School bands can allow musicians ...


4

In addition to the above, consider he may be also able to fall in love with a brass instrument that does not require all the fingers on the left hand. Trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, tuba, none of those require four fingers on the left hand, and all are beautiful instruments. It depends on his capability and desire to play professionally....there may be ...


4

With five years of playing under your belt, you probably know a fair bit of theory, but just aren't aware of it. Now's actually a good time to start; you'll get a lot of lightbulb moments - ah, that's why so and so works! A teacher is an obvious good choice - books are o.k., but they won't answer a question there and then, unless it's already in the book, ...


3

In general, someone with the skill to handle a hard piece of music will be able to learn it regardless of whether or not they've previously learned an easier arrangement. In most cases where someone who has learned an easier version finds a hard version frustrating, the problem is simply that they lack the skill to handle the hard version, and starting with ...


3

It is really useful for teaching music theory concepts. It is also good to play your harmony exercises for your students so they can hear why certain things work and others don't. I also, for instance, need a piano to teach my pupils how semitones and whole tones work. You also have much more freedom in the chords you play on piano than what is the case on ...


3

Music sounds fun and easy, but in reality it's hard work and a lot of study is needed to become a master. Having this said not everyone wants to become a master. In this sense I think teachers, that have followed a traditional curriculum, don't understand this and just tend to perpetuate the way they learned. I have had many discussions about this in the ...


3

In Britain we have several exam boards, from prelim up to Grade VIII on most instruments. After VIII, the exams are degree level, and are awarded with letters which are used after one's name. ABRSM is probably the longest running exam board, and holds exams in many countries around the world. I am guessing, but it's probably the countries that used to be ...


3

Rudolf Kolisch, an excellent musician known for his association with Schoenberg, played the violin left-handed due to an injury. There's also Playing Violin and Fiddle Left Handed


3

I have a missing index finger on my left hand. Due to that, along with other problems, I play violin left-handed. I started playing violin in my fifties, right-handed. It was difficult, but not as difficult as you might think. And you can find instruments specifically made for left-handed violinists. There is no need to alter a right-handed one.


3

There is the field of Computer Music and Sound and music computing which seem related to the background you have. For computer music, you can even find several reputable journals (i.e MIT) so you can use that as a starting point to find any other related fields.


3

Yes there are such melody studies. But, those studies may not be what you want or expect if you start by comparing things with the typical college harmony textbook. I think there is a tendency in harmony textbooks to abstract the topic into something divorced from rhythm and melody as epitomized by things like this flowchart... That may look scientific ...


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