30

From a sound design / sound engineer context As an effect, distortion is any process that alters the sound in the harmonic (tone, timbre) domain. Overdrive is a type of distortion. It is achieved by saturating (overdriving) the valves in an amplifier (or a simulation of this dynamic). In that context, overdrive is a subset of distortion. From a guitar ...


21

There are various solutions to this: Just doing it .. by which I mean, just tapping the switches and turning the knobs that get you to the setting you need. With practice, you can get quite speedy at this, but at the same time there are practical limitations on what can be achieved. If this is the only route available to you, you need to plan your pieces ...


13

A flanger adds a delayed version of the input signal back into itself. This produces a theoretically infinite series of equally spaced notches in the spectrum of the output signal (the spacing is 1/delay-time). Often this is referred to as comb filtering since a graph of the spectrum looks like a comb with downward pointing teeth. Usually flangers vary ...


13

No. A sustain pedal is a simple switch with a piece of cable attached that the keyboard uses to emulate the function of the sustain pedal on the piano - which basically means "let ring the notes when the pedal is depressed even if you lift your fingers off the keys". A sustainer pedal is a compressor, which is a thing that that limits the dynamic range of ...


12

very simple answer... E-Bow I've had one for 30 years, there's nothing quite like it, but it is a technique in & of itself. You can do the standard 'never-ending note' by simply holding it over a string & sliding/hammering up & down the fretboard, but with a little practise you can make it sound like violin/cello spiccato by banging the string ...


11

The short answer is yes, it matters. How much it matters, and whether it matters to you, depends on your pedals, the combinations in which you use them, and your desired sound. Here are some general rules that most people follow; nothing's hard and fast: Gain before synth. Effects come in two basic families. Gain effects alter the amplitude of portions of ...


10

Ivan Ivkovik' answer (a programmable patch) is certainly a way of doing this withouht fuss, but the programmable stuff is relatively modern (considering how long electric guitars have been around) and it wasn't always the case. I use a row of 6 individual effects units - there's no patch list or programmable setup, they're all autonomous. The reason I use ...


10

The important part of a violin sound is a gentle attack at the start of each note. Some players use a volume or swell pedal to achieve this: the note is played just as the pedal swells the volume in. Others use the volume pot on the guitar. Strats and Teles are quite easy to do this on, as the knob is close to where the string is picked. Again, the string is ...


10

I have a somewhat unique approach to playing bass, much more aggressive lines and sometimes play what would be considered a lead line if a guitar was playing it (or other lead instrument). With that said, my current setup is as follows: Tuner pedal- Obviously used for tuning but can be very helpful to act as a mute. This is especially helpful if you need ...


10

Interesting effect indeed! Obvious thing first: don't use a pick when playing Knopfler parts! His tone is very much dominated by the particular way he plucks the strings with his fingers, often snapping them down on the fret board. Here, like often in his soloing, he's playing a double stop; he usually does this with the thumb and index finger, almost ...


9

Both phasers and flangers are "synth" effects. The incoming signal is analyzed, and additional waveforms, based on the source, are combined with or substituted for the "clean" signal to produce the effect. This makes them distinct from "gain"-based effects that work primarily by altering the amplitude of various components of the original signal directly, ...


9

Most simple loop pedals don't know about bars - it's just a sound sample of a length you set. Typically: You start recording by tapping a pedal You play your instrument You mark the end of the loop by tapping the pedal. The length of the loop is now set. The loop keeps playing, over and over. When you overdub, you add sounds to the loop More advanced ...


9

Basically you use the boost pedal any time you need an extra bit of volume to stand out. Typically this is during a guitar solo, but yes, sometimes it is also useful in a song's chorus if the whole band picks up the energy a bit. But as with all effects, use your ears as a guide. Obviously you don't want to use it all the time, but for certain moments in a ...


9

When your effects are adding to the sound, you need to balance that by subtracting something in your playing. So for example, when heavy distortion is adding loads of new frequencies, playing two-note chords is the difference between a nice crunchy rock chord, and a mushy fuzz. With delay, you need to leave room in your playing, for the delayed sounds. It'...


9

It depends, really. If you decide to connect it to the input your amp, you do want to disable the amp modelling in the pedal (assuming that's possible). I can think of three ways to hook this up. I'll list each way and reasons why you would choose it: Connected to the PA You should consider connecting directly to the PA if: You don't have a very good amp....


9

If you have a power supply with eight outputs, for example, then you can add the tuner without taking away from the ability to power eight other pedals. It gives you nine pedals in total. An interesting follow up question is why more pedals don't have this. My guess would be that perhaps they require more current and the total draw would be greater than the ...


8

A pre-amp amplifies a quiet signal such as that from a passive guitar pickup, or a microphone, into a louder signal suitable for the input of a power amplifier. A couple of terms: "Instrument level" - the signal strength that typically comes out of a pickup instrument. This is generally so weak that if you connected it direct to some headphones, you wouldn'...


8

Short answer: Certain effects like overdrives and distortions typically go in front of the amp. Other effects like reverbs and delay typically go in the effects loop (when possible). Long answer: The effects loop on an amp usually sits between the pre-amp and power amp sections. Most of the "tone" of your amp comes from the pre-amp. Pre-amps tend to ...


8

TL;DR Which is better? That's up to your ears. Both bypasses have trade-offs: True Bypass is the most pure and high-fidelity, but it exposes your signal to long-cable degradation (plus it's more expensive). Pedals with buffered bypass will color your tone (especially if you have many of them), but you can run long cables without worry. More explanation ...


8

a tuner First off, I'd put a tuner; but this isn't really an effects pedal and you can get the same functionality in non-pedal form. a compressor : A compressor is probably the most used effects for bassists, by suitably tuning the controls you can make the attack and release of the notes more sharp providing a stronger, some might say punchier, rhythmic ...


8

So this guitar is quite a unique model, the John Lennon signature. Its pickup is not an acoustic-guitar pickup at all but, well, basically a standard high-impedance humbucker in small format. It's no big surprise then that it sounds more like an electric guitar: such a pickup, together with the cable capacitance, forms a 2nd order lowpass filter, and that ...


7

The conventional usage is to put distortion effect in front of the pre-amp; then, when you engage it, it drives the pre-amp harder, so that you get both the pedal's intrinsic distortion as well as pre-amp distortion. That being said, you should try both positions, and see what you like; there are no hard and fast rules.


7

This is really up to what you want to do. I think I first started out with a fuzz pedal, but I don't use it so much. A lot of bassists use a wah wah pedal. I have one myself and it is pretty fun. If you like this kind of sound, you can also try out an envelope filter. It is pretty nice as well. I also use a octaver from time to time, but only on certain ...


7

You'll have no idea whether you're really hearing a pedal correctly or not until you fix or replace that bad cable. The same goes for amp settings. Cranking the master volume throws off the EQ balance of the amp, so you're not even able to set the amp in a way that was intended when the amp was voiced. That's a bit less relevant for modeling amps but still a ...


7

This may be considered off topic given that it's kind of a gear recommendation. But I'll give the general concept of multi vs stompbox a go. Firstly, any time one thing is emulating another, it will never be a perfect emulation. It may be better or worse according to personal preference, but it will probably be different. And even among dedicated pedals ...


7

Just about everything sounds better with some reverb on it. For steel strings you can get magnetic pickups that require no power to function. For nylon strings you can get a piezo pickup but the output will be very low compared to magnetic pickups unless you have a preamp or other signal boost on it. For other instruments, just about anything that vibrates ...


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