7

Just about everything sounds better with some reverb on it. For steel strings you can get magnetic pickups that require no power to function. For nylon strings you can get a piezo pickup but the output will be very low compared to magnetic pickups unless you have a preamp or other signal boost on it. For other instruments, just about anything that vibrates ...


7

If the reverb is before the loop, I would expect the reverberating sound could be cut off in cases where reverb is long and loop is short. That might result it some artificial sound in terms of reverb suggesting a physical room/space. Putting reverb last should more naturally mimic a room/space.


6

If you have a long cable run from your guitar to your amp, and/or you have a lot of true bypass pedals chained together between your guitar and amp, and you feel like your guitar tone isn’t quite right, then a buffer may help your tone. If you love the sound of your guitar plugged right into your amp with a short cable, and it doesn’t sound as good when you ...


6

Could a low/high pass filtering solution work, or are the higher harmonics of the low notes too important? It can have an interesting effect - in fact I have experimented a lot with this on bass guitar - but you are correct that the harmonics of the lower notes would be above the fundamentals of the higher notes, and so you wouldn't really get full ...


6

With the pedal "off" your signal is routed past the effect, which is why that works. With the pedal "on" the signal is routed into the effect so any problem with the effect will become noticeable. The problem is that over the internet we cannot see what is wrong with your pedal. It could be a fault with the effect, or possibly a cable, but I would first ...


4

There isn't really any point to using an active pedal volume pedal in your setup. The advantage of an active pedal is that it can offer simultaneously high input impedance and low output impedance. High input impedance is important when you're directly connecting a passive guitar (else the pickup resonance is damped by the load), whereas low output impedance ...


4

By crikey this is broad… Half of any guitarist's sound is the guitarist, the rest is a combination of guitar, effects [if any] & amp/speaker structure. How long do you have to learn all this?? If you've 6 months, get a modelling amp/pedal, an old Line 6 will do a lot. An old Zoom will be cheaper, but you'll outgrow it rapidly. I recently threw an old ...


4

You're trying to combine "parallel DC power supplies." It's not as simple as Lego, though, because typically one supply is a few millivolts higher than another, which drives the second one in reverse. If you're lucky, nothing catches on fire besides that power supply which, to its astonishment, has become a power drain. With a few diodes rated for that ...


4

The looper will record exactly what you want to play into it. So if you want that particular instrument to have reverb, put it before. If you're building up on a recording, adding other parts, it will depend on whether you want everything to be 'reverbed' after - which is common practice - in which case, put it after. There is no right or wrong, and trial ...


4

One possibility is the battery. I bought a handful of battery connectors to use for mini pedals that don't have room for a battery inside. Unfortunately, many cheap battery adapters have the wrong polarity since they're intended for Arduino or other electronic gadgets that are center-positive. So make sure the battery is connected with the correct center-...


4

The traditional method of adding effects to your mix is to use an Aux or Effects bus, not the main outputs. The wiring is Aux out -> effect ->Aux in. This has several benefits: you can route signals to the effect independently of the main mix. E.g. you can apply the effect only to the vocals. you can control the mix between original signal and processed ...


3

Practically, the 250mA output will probably be just fine. Try. It's a pretty poor power supply that can't cope with a nominal 12% overload.


3

I’ve done this before with a completely normal guitar but you won’t like how I did it: I simply learned to play the guitar part all over again, but I learned how to play the part only the bottom three strings and then only the top three strings and then I recorded two separate tracks so I could process them differently. Obviously this method can’t be used ...


3

For the specific song you mention, the two key things are: a heavily overdriven, high gain input stage on the amp a well set up neck using tapping, you could play forever with only one hand (see any Van Halen) - if you aren't able to do this, either you aren't hammering on or tapping quickly/hard enough, or your neck has other issues. You do want your ...


3

Can I simply go Tele --> Zoom G3Xn --> Focusrite --> Garageband? Yes - this is a perfectly standard way to work. Will this damage any of my equipment in any way? No - not unless there's something non-obvious about your plans that you're not mentioning! Do I need to avoid using amp-sim effects in my Zoom before I connect to the Focusrite? No - the ...


3

Very good explanation of the technical aspects of both effects. Before electronics were used to simulate flanging, two tape recorders (reel to reel) were used. An identical recorded track was synchronized and played back on each machine. Since the mechanics of each machine play back at slightly different speeds, the faster machine would be slightly slowed ...


3

As Laurence says, adding reverb is more generally done at the mixing desk. The problem is that you (on stage) can't hear what sounds good for an audience. It may sound great to you, but awful out front, which is why performers have foldback speakers (also known as monitors) with a different mix. One reason things sound better with reverb is that you can't ...


3

Once in a while a person misunderstands how to connect a new pedal. Just to make certain it's hooked up correctly, the instrument plugs into the input connector, and the output connects to the input of the amplifier or to the input of the next in line foot pedal effect. If things are plugged in backwards, the effect will not pass the signal when the effect ...


2

I used the PocketPOD for live gigs several times and it is not ideal for it. It does not have footswith, plastic cursor switches are tiny and fragile. I also had problem with hum that was generated by PocketPOD when light dimmers were on even though I used ground isolated DI box. If you need to change the sound during the song you may connect PocketPOD to ...


2

Why no fun? Likely because the 4cm puts effects in front of the amp and also between the pre-amp and final power amp stage. If you wanted the ENGL output to go to the RC-300, then you would need another amp output to send a signal from the ENGL power amp. If the ENGL Fireball II amp had a line-out, such as an emulated headphone jack, then you could send ...


2

'connect my guitar to the PA system'. We don't know what type of PA system it is. It might be a real PA, or it could be a glorified home stereo. So we're going to have to make an assumption that it's a real (or at least semi-pro) PA, with XLR inputs for each channel. There are any number of multi-effect pedals out there, from a few dollars up to many-few ...


2

The following list is based on actual current draw, not on the 'power supply requirements'. Boss, for example, say that their BD-2 needs a PSA power supply which can provide 200mA at 9V. Of course they will, because they sell a PSA power supply which provides, believe it or not, 200mA at 9V. But - the actual current draw of the pedal, as measured by a mA ...


2

The manual for the Zoom G3Xn states that its output is suitable for either a guitar amp or external powered speakers. It should therefore be OK directly into the jack plug input of your Focusrite. Turn the input gain right down then try - creeping the gain up gradually. It's unclear whether the LINE or INST setting is best. Try both (but turn the ...


2

You can put a pickup on a ukulele if you want, and run it through all the effects a guitarist might use. A multi-effects setup will often include one or more pedals for volume and wah-wah. A single effect box normally uses an internal battery, with the option of an external power supply. More typically, a uke is just miced and put through the PA. Maybe ...


2

The old way people use these pedals is to create a preset that specifies one key and how many harmony notes should be added and in some cases which diatonic intervals to add. So a preset might be in C major and always add a diatonic third above and fourth below (making a second inversion diatonic triad). When changing songs or changing keys in the middle of ...


2

If what you’re doing works fine for your particular situation, keep doing it. However your iPhone mic will be picking up all sorts of other sounds from your environment and applying the onboard effects to those sounds as well. Your current solution will let you down badly as soon as you want to perform with other people, or if you were playing through ...


1

USB instrument interfaces don't have to be large and expensive, there are small and inexpensive versions available. If you want to use a standard effects pedal like a WAH then a simple USB interface will work. The Behringer interface line starts at around $30 USD. You would send the guitar into the expression pedal, then into the interface. If you want ...


1

The early machines needed the song's key to be inputted. That in itself was problematic, in that then, it would only reproduce diatonic notes. Which was fine for most harmony - thirds, fifths, octaves. I worked with a band once that used one, and at a certain place in a song it sounded off. The singer accused the other two singers of being out of tune, until ...


1

According to the product manual [PDF], it seems that the active pedal has a buffer and the passive one does not: Feature Comparison Bloomery / Active No String Tuner Out Solid Steel Construction Dual Buffer Includes Optional Grip Tape 20mA Center Negative 9MM Power Bloomery / Passive No String Tuner Out Solid Steel ...


1

Filters are a good start for isolating low vs high parts of a signal, but as a observed in comments and other answers, the upper harmonics of the low notes will be in the high portion of the output. But, we can refine this method by using phase cancellation as well. Start by taking the frequency spectrum with wide buckets to find the low note (this may be a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible