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3

Your instrument appears to be a 'Top Twenty' Bass that was made in Japan. It is possibly a 60/70's but can't be sure. The pick up on the bass is a Hofner staple pick-up so that would er towards 60's. I have a similar bass with the same pick-up.


0

"can be heard" by who? Maybe the people for you house have a sensitive ear for a Sonic 2000 Ear Amplifier commercial from 1990's. Maybe they lost 30% of their auditive sense. Or maybe their ears are totally ok. Only they can answer your doubt, not the appartment.


0

Download any sound metering app for you smartphone and do some measurements on a quiet day. Those apps simply use your phone's mic and display some kind of decibel gauge or frequency response graph. Measure yourself talking on a normal tone, or a normal conversation or for example the t.v. on news broadcast at your usual listening volume. Then measure your ...


1

One problem is resonance with anything the guitar is touching. If you are sitting on a soft surface and the instrument is only touching you, then the most they can possibly hear will be somewhat less than what you can hear. If part of the guitar is touching a bedpost or a wall or floor (note double bass players!) then the sound will carry through the whole ...


4

A neighbour inclined to complain will hear ANYTHING through the most solid of walls. But it shouldn't annoy a tolerant one.


5

The short answer to your question is YES, it is possible to hear unplugged electric guitars through walls. Even a solid body will make enough noise to penetrate some walls. Floors I am not sure about but that depends on several factors. The quality of materials and construction used in the apartment. How hard you play. Where in the apartment you are ...


2

I remember when I tried teaching my teenage son to play guitar. He squeezed too hard, so that he cried while trying to get through the lick for "Daytripper". There is a great chance that you are squeezing the string too hard as well, which takes away speed, hurts your fingers and pulls the note sharp. There is no good to fretting too hard. If it's ...


4

Based on your age you are still developing and may grow more. Changes in hand size etc will change the way you play. Other have pointed out that there are different kinds of pain. You could help by describing it better. Is it in the finger tips, the palm, or the meaty part of the hand (by the thumb or under the pinky)? If you are young and a beginner you ...


5

There are a few kinds of pain that can happen when playing an instrument and the solutions are very different: If the pain is in your joints, it is a posture / form issue and you should really correct it. These things hurt more in the long run. You are young and a bass is rather heavy so this can be the cause. Sometimes you can even get pain in the shoulder ...


3

You call it your 'fingering hand', and say you've tried with a pick - so I must assume it's your right hand that's problematic. A lot of bass players use thumb, and two fingers - index and middle.Really good ones will use all available! It could well be that you're playing too hard. There's absolutely no need. Slapping and popping are different, but I guess ...


17

Bass is a tough gig when you're only 12. It will get better. I started playing bass in a band at 13 - we were all a bit clueless & it was decided Friday we really ought to have a bassist [yup, we didn't have one before that… we didn't know any better ;) So i bought one on Saturday & gigged it for the first time Sunday. That was one heck of a learning ...


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