33

It won't work, unless you're using a piezo system which induces current from physical vibrations. An electric guitar works because the magnetic field around the vibrating strings induces current in the coils of the pickup. So the strings must have some ferrous content for the EM-induction to take place. It could conceivably work on a guitar like the ...


12

Metal, but not just any metal. Both steel-string and classical acoustic guitars generally use metal, such as bronze or silver-played copper, for the windings to add mass and lower the frequency, but they don't have much magnetic metal, so they don't work well with soundhole pickups, which are magnetic like electric guitar pickups. Most electrified acoustic ...


10

Nylon fishing line is commonly used for African instruments such as the kora and ngoni, as a matter of convenience. Strings were previously leather, but of course nylon is better. Nylon fishing line would also work on the upper strings of classical guitars, with perhaps some issues on string tension if you can't get the right thickness of strings. It would ...


7

Pinch harmonics, just as any other harmonics, produces one of the notes belonging to the harmonic series of the note, that is: octave octave + 5th 2 octaves 2 octaves + major third (flat) 2 octaves + fifth 2 octaves + minor seventh (flat) 3 octaves and so on - see the entry on the Harmonic series on Wikipedia. The ones I put in bold will be probably the ...


3

There's fishing wire which is made of metal, and there's fishing line which is just a nylon string and has no metal. The video shows fishing line made of nylon string. Just as fishing line might work as a temporary string on an acoustic guitar, a length of fishing wire might work as a temporary string on an electric guitar. Some brands (and/or models) of ...


3

Harmonics are produced when a string is touched at a node. That is, a spot where the string can split an equal number of times. The obvious one is the half way point - fret 12 on an open string. It's the easiest one to produce - the node itself being slightly wider than others further away, and is also the loudest. On an open string, the next node splits the ...


3

Start by re-setting the neck - with lower pitch comes lower tension, so the strings may be affected by the action. A high action will necessitate the strings having to be pressed harder, sending them sharp. Using the 12th fret harmonic is a time-honoured way to check against the fretted 12 pitch. That's of course after putting on a new set of strings, as old ...


2

I'm more experienced with Telecasters than Stratocasters, but I see this problem with gauges much higher, such as .013s trying to get into standard-neck baritone territory. I took off the low-Es spring to gain some space, but it seems impossible to have blues-rock post-1982 if you can't intonate a Strat in Eb. Taking it to a luthier for a setup is a ...


2

For a very small footprint, 2 amp system you could use a couple of iPhones, or tablets, or androids, old, new... whatever. Buy 2 guitar interfaces like Peavey Ampkit. iRig, etc.... Very inexpensive. Download the apps for the said devices, AmpKit, Amplitube, Tonebridge... Tons of options here. (many are free). Run both the signals to a mini-mixer from the ...


2

Audio interface or not, you will need a program that lets you hear your "microphone" in real time (whether that is an actual microphone or a guitar is irrelevant, from the software side of things.) There are free and paid solutions for this, such as Garageband, Logic, FL Studio, and Reason. Without an audio interface, there are a couple of extra ...


1

What exactly is the pitch of a pinch harmonic sound? It's a harmonic, done in a specific way. Often, you press the node with your fretting hand and hit the note with your picking hand, but with the pinch harmonic, you're doing both with your picking hand. The harmonic most guitarists first encounter is the one at the 12th fret, which is the octave of the ...


1

You'll need a USB guitar cable and an amp simulator program (there are several free ones).


1

To paraphrase this post: https://www.vguitarforums.com/smf/index.php?topic=22478.msg200736#msg200736 Nothing is impossible, but it's cheaper to buy an amp with actual effects loop. If you have access to another amp and speaker you can use take signal for the looper out of the headphone out, as this article suggests: https://www.zombieguitar.com/using-a-...


1

Doubtful that the fishing line would endure the the "string tension" needed to tune to pitch. For a standard electric pick-up, no. Metal strings are needed. Carry an extra set in a sealed baggie. Keep playing :-)


1

That all depends on your style, preference and your guitar setup. I highly recommend DR: Drop-Down Tuning electric guitar strings. I have the DR DDT-12 (12-60) on my Ibanez-RG drop-C tuning. I play Melodic Death Metal and I have my action set very low and the DDT's have an amazingly heavy/crunchy tone without sacrificing clarity or string tension. They also ...


1

Get yourself a set of "YellowJackets" and a pair of EL84 tubes. Swap out the EL34 tubes for the above configuration. This will reduce the overall power output and might really sound great with the Hi/Med/Low power switch that amp already has. The EL84 tubes will "break-up" or become over-driven sooner, yet still keep that EL34 British ...


1

I've read that in the early years, Buck Owens would use one channel of a Fender Twin Reverb and the lead guitarist, Don Rich, would use the other. I recall, though, that the second channel has a volume drop, which might but be helpful to you.


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