6

Any vibrato is set up as a balance between the strings and the springs. So once that balance is achieved, it shouldn't make much if any difference whether they're .008s or .013s. Obviously the bendability will be different, but that's a different issue. You may also need to check action and intonation.


5

You can do that with almost any electric guitar. That's what an electric guitar sounds like when you don't add any effects. You'll want to look for an amplifier that has a "clean channel", i.e. one without effects.


5

You've just made me pick up a guitar and do some bending! Personally, sometimes my thumb is in the centre at the back, sometimes it's almost over the top of the neck (close to the fat E), and sometimes it's not actually on the neck at all - it's pointing away from me, under the neck! You might have been told thumb in the middle of the neck is the correct ...


3

Chords are meant to support melody rather than dictate melody. This is something that many musicians get backwards when they first start improv. Joe Pass, for example, would play beautiful melodic lines that defined chords progressions. It takes time to learn but there isn't a lot of variety in western music. For some musicians a drone chord or vamp is ...


3

Improvisation is live composing, and composing is slow improvisation. If you haven't been given instructions on what to do, you have to make it up yourself. Whatever you don't have, you make up. If you don't have a rhythm, you imagine a rhythm. If you don't have chords, you imagine chords. But you think you do have chords? ... over just a chord repeating ...


3

This is virtually asking for gear recommendations - which is offside for this site. However, it has more of the sound of an acoustic or electro-acoustic guitar than a solid electric. Most guitars heard on tracks have some sort of effects used on them, whereas this has maybe a little reverb and that's it. The sound of any guitar being played is contributed ...


3

Moving from light gauge strings to heavier gauge stings on a Floyd Rose style bridge will cause you problems; unless you take care to set the bridge up properly, or have a shop or someone set it up for you. As Tim said in his answer, once the guitar is set up properly, there should not be much of a difference, in terms of action at least. The string tension ...


2

What mistakes have you made while restringing and setting up a Floyd Rose guitar? In 1990, I left some oil heating up in a frying pan in the kitchen, while doing up a Floyd Rose bridge in another room: not just re-stringing, but intonation. Luckily, I had the ensuing fire put out before the firemen showed up. Minor damage to a few cabinets, and a ceiling ...


2

To be quite honest, I think a metronome would serve most beginners better than pedals. Being able to press a button and get a different sound is fun but doesn't do much to help you grow musically. And note that some exceptional, world class guitarists (for example Derek Trucks) eschew the use of pedals altogether. Nothing wrong with doing stuff to make ...


2

Even though your amp provides built-in effects, it is very convenient to have the same effects as pedals so you can turn them on and off. Another reason is that you can change the order of the effects. For example, distortion into delay is very different from delay into distortion. Some basic types to consider include the ones you've already mentioned, ...


1

In general, the quality of a guitar (wood selection, construction tolerances, pickups) will be more important to creating a good clean sound than if there are a bunch of effects applied. Not saying a Squier can't do it, but e.g. something made out of plywood would not be ideal.


1

slighly distorted, yet very clean and fat tone Sounds like a general Blues tone. On any amp or FX circuit, look for a "gain" or "overdrive" knob/function. If you have a circuit with "pre" and "post" gain options, you can turn the "pre" down and crank the "post" to overdrive the tubes naturally. On a Fender Blues Junior tube combo these are called "master" (...


1

This is a great question. You're right that some guitarists get very specific about the type of guitar and amp that they use with specific pedals, but for your purposes, you won't need to get that in-depth about sculpting your sound right away. Once you start learning what different effects do, you'll know when you've outgrown the ones you have. So until ...


1

The easiest way to do this is probably to use an audio interface. An audio interface lets you plug in a 1/4" jack and connect the interface to your computer using USB. The interface can convert analog to digital signal, and vice versa. It looks something like this.


1

If you want an easy time, go one string at a time, and put the same type/gauge of string on it that you had before. Changes in string gauge/tension will require a bit of care to fix, like I recently answered here: Floyd Rose in Standard Tuning with .011 gauge strings Aside from that, most Floyd Rose style bridges are not set up for ball end strings. That ...


1

At the risk of the answers to this question being too opinion-based, it appears the golden-age of the Les Paul Jr was during the years of it's original production 1954-1963. This would be ignoring the later reissues and variations. I base this statement on this article, from vintageguitar.com, in which took place a friendly contest in order to determine ...


1

The question of whether to have a tremolo on a Strat is complicated by the fact that a tremolo changes how a Strat sounds, even if you don't use it. The springs in the back add a kind of natural reverb that won't be there on a hardtail. Eric Clapton and Pete Townshend never use the tremolo bar on their Strats but still play trem-equipped models for exactly ...


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