10

This depends on what you are trying to play. Some day you may want to play one of those notes along with a note on the other string. Then the touching will be bad. There are a lot of subtle manipulations required for playing clean guitar. Sometimes we use our fingers to dampen strings so they don't vibrate with the one we played. Other times we need the ...


6

It's not bad at all - unless that other string sounds! In fact, it's a technique most guitarists (particularly electric using overdriven sounds) use all the time. It effectively stops extraneous noises from other strings sounding. Occasionally, you may want that top string to be still sounding, or leave it clear to vibrate as a sort of overtone from a lower ...


5

It’s referred to as a contour, or forearm contour.


3

Quartal harmony may be something interesting to explore. I stumbled into it while studying Alan Holdworth, who uses quartal harmony to build arpeggios. I was always (and am still) fascinated by Holdsworth's note selections, arpeggios and scale runs. "Use of the terms quartal and quintal arises from a contrast, compositional or perceptual, with traditional ...


2

Reading the Wikipedia page for this item, the output impedance is rated at 10 k ohms. However, you cannot measure output impedance by sticking an ohmmeter across the leads. Simple things to check: is the full 9V showing on the battery output? When you turn up the gain & pluck strongly , what is the output voltage? -- Wiki says it's rated around 4.5 ...


2

I do play both classical and "modern" electric guitar and I would say they are different instruments. While I agree with your statements entirely, the approach you describe on the classical guitar is primarily the classical school of thought which has influenced you. I would guess (and I could be wrong) that if you had picked up the guitar and started ...


2

Personally I practice with a loop station a lot of the time. Accompanying myself forces me to focus on timing, harmonics and interplay whether I’m comping, adding color or playing leads. And being able to loop your leads and listen back can be very informative and productive for making improvements on the fly. I’m often surprised by some of the gold I dig up ...


2

As commented under your question, this would seem like a drop tuning down to the alternate pitches. Tune down to them, not up.


2

A great exercise is to examine closely many good tunes, and their harmonies. Check what notes are played on beat one of each bar. Check the pattern of the rhythm of notes making up the tune. Check what 'foreign' notes are used - and where they come in a bar. Check how several notes might get played one way on one chord, and in a similar way on a ...


1

(TL;DR: harmony and phrasing) Harmony You ask "How to achieve harmony?" There's nothing to achieve, some kind of harmonic feeling or "context" always exists. The question is, what to you do to the harmony with your solo, so I transform your question to: "How to achieve an understanding of what I'm doing to the harmony." Any note can be played over any ...


1

If you don't use distortion, then you absolutely can use an acoustic amp for electric guitar too. An acoustic amp is essentially just a PA-style general-purpose speaker in one chassis together with a good preamp and useful EQ controls. It sounds very similar to a straight DI into the console, but with more tone control, incl controls that help avoid feedback....


1

Sounds like a bit of a silly idea. Why do you need to do it? You could just use a capo on a higher fret, and imagine that's the open strings. Or simply play the song with standard tuning - I suppose you're using tab, in which case, it'll still work, but sound low. There's not ony the high possibility that strings will break, but a more important one that it ...


1

By the sound of it, there is a reverse wiring issue. Hum getting louder when touching the strings rather than quieter is indicative of a ground connection accidentally being wired to output. If its only occurring on the neck pickup, it is likely that whoever opened the guitar last mistakenly wired the neck pickup's ground to the jack output, rather than the ...


1

I must admit I'm struggling to create my own practice routine. My goals are not too different from yours. These are the elements I play with: Warmup (5 min). I would either play fingering exercises, scales or right hand picking technique. The key is not to make any bends or any stretch that might hurt my left hand before it's warmed up. Fretboard knowledge ...


1

Does it happen at any volume? try low gain, high master and other combinations. Also try with all effects and modeling off. If it happens at any volume it sounds like the input signal is inadvertently causing the amp to clip and go into some type of protection mode. Check any connections you can like cables, input jack and the fuse. If it still happens you ...


1

One possibility is that you are releasing the string too slowly, so at some point, when the string is no longer pressed firmly against the fretboard, but not yet completely released, it buzzes against that fret. A similar buzz will happen if you are fretting a whole chord, but some of the strings are not pressed properly against the fretboard


1

'Sfortzando' is a word that works. I don't think there's a special term for everyone playing thus simultaneously, but on a score - yes, even for a small group - those notes would be marked as sf.


1

If it’s a little more force, an accent. If it has a lot of attack you could say it’s marcato. Although, if you want something a little less classical you could call it a “hit”.


1

If you want to hear your voice through the headphones, it's going to be difficult to avoid using a microphone! You might be surprised at how cheaply you can buy a small mixer with inputs for guitar and mic. Look at the Berhinger stuff. Maybe no need to use the Fender amp at all - mixers generally have a headphone output.


1

Some things to consider are: play lots of chord tones or large interval leaps definitely look at combining downbeat rhythms with syncopation, a lot of downbeat rhythm can give it drive, but a few syncopations add contrast and energy hold the "chord" while the bass or second guitar changes to another chord, exploit the resulting dissonance (sort of like a ...


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