14

Playability is the most important factor for a newbie's first guitar. If the action is awful - like it can be on some cheaper electrics - and it won't stay in tune, you're going to consider giving up quite soon. Any first guitar you get will at some point be outgrown. The sound of a guitar these days can easily be moulded with modelling amps, so the pup ...


12

The term is related to Steinberger's TransTrem tremolo system, which requires strings of a specific length to work properly- the strings are "calibrated" for use with this system. Any other set of strings would then be "non-calibrated", and the strings are marked as such so TransTrem users don't buy the wrong set. Here is another ...


10

You've had the guitar for 7 or 8 yrs. That means either you just put up with it and its foibles, or it's basically not a bad guitar. As in it stays in tune, isn't too bad to play, isn't falling apart, and the fittings and fixtures all work fine. This being the case, it's probably worthwhile bastardising it with other pups. That will maybe involve different ...


8

Most guitar jack sockets are made of 30 cents' worth of bent tin. If you want to try diagnose/fix it then your simplest running order is Spray it with contact cleaner. Loosen the socket a bit & see if you can rotate it 90 - 180° so your cable pulls at a different angle. (If you think this might be too faffy, combine it with 3.) Take the socket out &...


8

I've done this before: I put Fender Custom Shop vintage Strat pickups in literally the cheapest guitar that was in the store when I bought my first guitar (a Peavey Predator Strat clone). It definitely improved the guitar's sound, and it definitely doesn't sound or play like a Fender Custom Shop Strat. For me, it was worth it because I bought the pickups ...


8

There are several good answers here already, but I'll add a couple more considerations no one else mentioned yet: Your question seems to imply that you're okay with the tones you're getting, but want more sustain. You mentioned wanting to get incredible sustain like what Gilmour has in Money (and other pieces of his too). Technique and the guitar certainly ...


6

If it's a solid body guitar then its construction likely does not contribute to the sound, other than helping with sustain. I was raised on the idea that the body was just there for cosmetics. If the neck is good, it doesn't slip out of adjustment and cause buzzing or de-tuning of the instrument and if the other mechanisms are in good shape, e.g. bridge, ...


4

Pickups may not be the problem There's an interesting thing with cheap electric guitars. They rarely sound as good as more expensive ones - and it's rarely anything at all to do with the bits that most obviously make the sound. The single biggest contributor to tone is you. And with a cheap guitar that age, I'd bet every penny I have that the frets are worn ...


4

Depends on what you want from it. New pickups won't make a $100 guitar worth $1000, but if you like it and want to make it suit your purposes and abilities better, or want to expand your skills in guitar building and electronics, this is a great way to go forward.


4

Yes, it is possible with pitch-shifters, "octavers" and synthesizers. Which product is suitable depends on several things. (1) do you need to do this live or could you record on an audio track and then do the transformation off-line? (2) Do you need it to be polyphonic or would a mono synth be ok? (3) Do you need it to transpose down only i.e. for ...


4

Your impressions about humbuckers versus single-coils are generally correct, although there are notable exceptions (Richie Blackmore and Yngwie Malmsteen playing hard rock and metal on Stratocasters, for example). You may not need an explicit single-coil pickup on your guitar, though. Many guitars that have humbuckers offer options to access only one coil of ...


4

I'm considering getting a guitar with a HSS configuration so I can have both a humbucker and single coils, but I'm not entirely sure that's necessary. Great idea - then you can learn about the differences between those pickup types for yourself - much more valuable than collecting others' opinions. The second thing is about the pricepoint of the guitar. I ...


3

Lots of great answers here, so I won't repeat the many good points they make, but just say that I myself have an Epiphone 7-string Les Paul -- since the price for the Gibson is so much higher and the performance improvement is very small, if any, as long as you get one of the GOOD Epiphones. I replaced the stock pickups with Fishman Fluence pickups since I ...


3

I was thinking maybe it's time to upgrade and wanted to get a new guitar When it comes to solid guitars my personal belief is that the pickups and their placing make much more difference to the sound than the body. As mentioned below, I like to do a blind test. Whichever way you go, take your old guitar with you to the guitar store.** Play it against other ...


3

Several things. First is that the arm is a lever. A lever gives more leverage. So using our hand instead will produce less leverage, so less chance of breakage. Second is with the bridge like that, there's lots of movement to raise the strings' pitch, but little to drop it. The bridge needs to be able to move both ways, so tighten the screws underneath until ...


3

To get the Jeff Beck floating bridge thing, you need to be able to go both up and down, and I think you've used up all the down. Here's Carl Verheyen explaining how to set up a Strat so it floats, which should guide you. I would tighten the claw and retune to balance. That should make it behave more nicely and allow intonation. Best of luck.


3

A couple of screwdrivers, at 180degrees to each other, under the base of the knob will do it. Put something, card or suchlike on the scratchplate to protect it, and either turn both drivers gradually, or use them as levers. Do not turn the knob any more, as that will either break the pot or break off the wires attatched to it, and give you more problems. The ...


3

For the beginner, an inexpensive strat copy and a modelling amp would suit your needs nicely. We live in a golden age of inexpensive guitars, Harley Benton is, as I write, known for decent inexpensive guitars, and the Boss Katana is as respected as any amp in that class. You can swap out things like pickups and bridges and tuners, but the main thing about a ...


3

Good question! In a nutshell I think that putting together a quality instrument is kind of like cooking. You need to have quality fundamental ingredients to make a delicious dish. Spice provides the fine tuning. You’ll never make lousy ingredients taste better with more salt, you can only hide their flaws behind the distraction. This follows the “Garbage in, ...


2

"Can anybody point out what my problem with my guitar might be?” Yes, it might be that the lighter gauge strings are sitting too deep in the nut slots. If the guitar was set up for heavier gauge strings, the slots will be wider than optimal for the new, lighter set, thus the strings will sit deeper and be too close to the frets. This can cause the ...


2

It may be string replacement. If it didn't buzz before then it is not likely uneven frets. Do you happen to know what gauge was on it when you bought it? When you change gauge you change the tension that neck feels and because of this the truss rod in the neck should be adjusted to balance that change in tension. Since you are a complete beginner I'd take ...


2

I recognize that this is an unusual answer format for this site, but I think this is the best way I can illustrate the timing here. It's not the open B that's played quickly but rather the bend that is quick.


2

Solved, just used a large plier to get off the knob.


2

It is not the same note ^^ it is a B flat (the note between A and B), so you play: Note Fret Finger A open - B 2 2 Bb 1 1


2

I totally agree with @ToddWilcox. Furthermore I do not suggest the "cheapest" guitars because often they are quite annoying and have some difficulties for a newbie. Maybe you can take a look at PRS guitars. They are relatively cheap and suits well If you are newbie. (I am not adverstising the brand just take a look and choose yourself). Also look ...


1

You can bet your last buck that putting nice pickups in what you may consider is a mediocre guitar, will absolutely up the retail price! No, seriously though... it will absolutely make the guitar better. Think of a guitar getting new pickups as being akin to a car getting a new engine ---- even if it's a lousy car, its got a BRAND NEW engine. Hopefully that ...


1

The other answers consider electronic techniques to transpose pitches lower. But no one has yet mentioned the capo, a mechanical way to transpose all the guitar pitches higher.


1

Yes, pitch-shift effect 'pedals' are available. The lower 4 strings of guitar match those of bass guitar. Or you can get into the realms of guitar-controlled synthesis. Unfortunately the rules of this forum prohibit recommending specific gear. Though that would be useful here.


1

I cannot be definitive, as I'm not a Strat guy, but later G&L bridges have a set screw to force the saddles together so they resonate.


1

We'll start here: Note: There are also fret buzzes on most strings but it only buzzes when playing an open string in the high E. Generally, it sounds like your instrument has backbow. Your truss rod could be too tight, so that the strings rattle on the frets. The test is: capo the first fret, fret the last fret, and there should be some but not much space ...


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