57

You’ve discovered a very deep fact about music that is referred to as “mode.” It isn’t ridiculous at all to say that the same notes can have a different emotional quality depending on how you use them, in fact that’s a huge part of what composition is about! Most western composers use the same twelve notes to express everything from rage to joy to anhedonia. ...


57

Some alternatives from the top of my head Double the guitar part on both guitars Double the bass part on one guitar Split the roles inside the chord: guitar 1 plays power chords (root and fifth only), and guitar 2 plays the third and the fifth or seventh, without root note. Split the parts rhythmically: guitar 1 playing kick/snare and guitar 2 playing "hi-...


41

STOP PLAYING You should not feel any electricity when playing guitar. There could be many reasons, including electrical equipment malfunction or incorrect electric installation in your room. There were accidents of electric shock from music equipment, including fatal ones. Frequent causes are malfunction of the amplifier or ground mismatch between two ...


32

It won't work, unless you're using a piezo system which induces current from physical vibrations. An electric guitar works because the magnetic field around the vibrating strings induces current in the coils of the pickup. So the strings must have some ferrous content for the EM-induction to take place. It could conceivably work on a guitar like the ...


31

From a sound design / sound engineer context As an effect, distortion is any process that alters the sound in the harmonic (tone, timbre) domain. Overdrive is a type of distortion. It is achieved by saturating (overdriving) the valves in an amplifier (or a simulation of this dynamic). In that context, overdrive is a subset of distortion. From a guitar ...


31

The direct answer: No, this is not good teaching There is very little difference between electric and acoustic guitar. Playing all 6 strings can be absolutely fine on either. Many barre chords are 6 string. The question should really be "...shouldn't play all 6 strings together when using distortion" When you use distortion you add in harmonics which ...


30

Gain is the input level control, it decides how hard the input signal hits the preamp. Guitar amps often exploit the effect of hitting it HARD, overdriving it into distortion. Volume controls how much the output from the preamp is amplified. Again, specifically on a guitar amp, there may be the possibility of driving the speakers into interesting overload ...


26

It basically comes down to how the way the notes/beats are emphasised affects how your ear hears how the beats are grouped. Listening to a piece in 5/4, you'll hear that the beats are audibly in groups of 5. Try counting '1-2-3-4-5' with the beats in these songs, and you'll find that your counting stays in sync with the rhythmic pattern in the song... ...


24

This is a question without a single, solve-everything answer. There are a number of different approaches you can take, and different people will have their own preferences. Fake it. This works well in some traditional music, bluegrass, rock, or jazz, where a certain amount of improvisation is expected of a musician. With a song you haven’t played in ...


23

When you're dead. Seriously, though. Pick up that guitar. You're already better than the guy who didn't.


22

It is hard to not touch other strings when you bend, especially if you bend wider than a semitone. The trick here is to mute strings that are not supposed to sound to eliminate unwanted noise instead of trying to not touch them. Some ways to do that are: Mute with the index finger of your fretting (left) hand and use middle and ring fingers to bend. Push ...


22

The difference between C major and A minor, as you have observed, is not the collection of notes. The difference is how those notes are used. A melody or harmony based in C major will emphasize different notes than one in A minor. This emphasis can take different forms such as which note a melody starts on, which one it ends on, and which ones it chooses to ...


21

There are various solutions to this: Just doing it .. by which I mean, just tapping the switches and turning the knobs that get you to the setting you need. With practice, you can get quite speedy at this, but at the same time there are practical limitations on what can be achieved. If this is the only route available to you, you need to plan your pieces ...


21

Down picking allows one to apply more power which may be necessary for certain types of riffs. It also makes the attacks more even so they sound more like "chug - chug - chug - chug" instead of "chug - ga - chug - ga" (sorry but I don't know how to express it better). So the choice of picking technique is based on which sound you want to hear, with the ...


21

Tim basically has answered your question but I think this deserves larger type: Your amp is trying to kill you!!! Stop using it and get it replaced or repaired This kind of problem is most common in older amps that have tube output stages. A tube output design for a guitar amp almost always requires an output transformer. The way the transformer is wired, ...


19

On a solid body guitar the body shape and wood don't matter much. The most important thing about a guitar is the mechanical impedance as seen by the string. The string start vibrating and the rest of the guitar sucks out energy at different rates at different frequencies. This is determined by the mechanical losses in the overall force chain: bridge, body, ...


19

Over the years, Fender has refined the design of its guitars in ways which it feels make a better product for modern tastes. Modern bridges have more sustain, better resonance, more reliable and fluid tremolo mechanisms. Their current standard fretboard has a higher circumference - that is, it's flatter. Because of modern materials they can make the neck ...


19

Always use your ears. If something makes the sound better, it's good. If it makes the sound worse, it's bad. If it has no audible effect then it doesn't matter (unless you can think of other factors, like cramp). In this instance, you need the ability to leave open strings untouched, so that they sound cleanly. However if you don't want to pluck that ...


19

Playability is the most important factor for a newbie's first guitar. If the action is awful - like it can be on some cheaper electrics - and it won't stay in tune, you're going to consider giving up quite soon. Any first guitar you get will at some point be outgrown. The sound of a guitar these days can easily be moulded with modelling amps, so the pup ...


18

The guitar mode is referencing each string EADGBE in order from highest frequency to lowest frequency. So the high E (thinnist string) would be 1E, then the B string would be 2B, then the G string would be 3G, ect all the way to the low E string. The chromatic mode just tells you what note you are playing and how close it is to that note. i.e. A, A♯/B♭, B,...


17

The sounds in the songs you've listed are actually pretty different to my ears, but I'll try to generalize and go through some examples. Here is the raw line for reference. This is a modified strat with an EMG-SA in the neck position. This is important because EMG is an active pickup so the signal level is higher. This means it will distort sooner. So keep ...


17

This could be a lethal problem. It's just not safe to continue. Firstly, check the socket you usually use. Socket testers are very cheap, and worth having. When I was gigging several times a week, the first thing I would do is check the stage electrics. Several times, we had to use sockets which were not the convenient ones on stage - they were faulty - ...


17

You can’t make a bad guitar sound like a good guitar no matter what processing you have. You can completely change the sound to something where it’s not possible to tell whether it’s a good or bad guitar. Sometimes people want exactly that. I find that the very popular Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier amp makes every guitar sound identical. But some styles of ...


16

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


16

It's because of the pseudo-compression that using distortion effect gives. The same will be true if you use a clean channel with a compressor, or if your amp has a natural compressing effect, as many do. What's happening is... You play a chord normally: You get quite nice mid-range strum of the strings, nothing surprising there. You play a palm muted ...


16

Around time stamp 0:46 he steps on a gain/distortion/fuzz pedal with his left foot. Watch his leg under his fretting hand. Then he plays single notes in the neck pickup with a higher gain sound than he had in the intro. Even though he’s got more gain, it still sounds kinda clean because he’s playing single notes and he’s on the neck pickup, which is more ...


16

I'd give up on the idea before you even start. Sure, you can change necks, assuming both are compatible, but unless both fit perfectly, with almost zero movement tolerance, you'd have to line the whole thing up again. They'd each need a different action & each would have been resting without tension while the other neck was on, meaning you'd need to ...


15

I think you have two problems: Wrist geometry and muscle tension. Wrist geometry Wrist geometry is important for both allowing you to use the least amount of effort and muscle tension and for allowing your muscles and tendons to move in the directions in which they work best. An angled wrist (like in your first picture) fights your muscles. If you want to ...


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