New answers tagged

0

Check out StewMac, they have everything you need to clean all types of wood. Also, a lot of good advice there. I think it's www.stewmac.com Mike


0

This guy uses just a pen with a pretty good effect - at least creating a "tremolo" I used a pen to imitate the sound of a violin and cello playing famous guitar riffs. No midi, synth or other effects has been used. Can you guess all these songs? Don’t forget to let me know what you think :)


9

This depends on what you are trying to play. Some day you may want to play one of those notes along with a note on the other string. Then the touching will be bad. There are a lot of subtle manipulations required for playing clean guitar. Sometimes we use our fingers to dampen strings so they don't vibrate with the one we played. Other times we need the ...


1

Does it happen at any volume? try low gain, high master and other combinations. Also try with all effects and modeling off. If it happens at any volume it sounds like the input signal is inadvertently causing the amp to clip and go into some type of protection mode. Check any connections you can like cables, input jack and the fuse. If it still happens you ...


6

It's not bad at all - unless that other string sounds! In fact, it's a technique most guitarists (particularly electric using overdriven sounds) use all the time. It effectively stops extraneous noises from other strings sounding. Occasionally, you may want that top string to be still sounding, or leave it clear to vibrate as a sort of overtone from a lower ...


5

It’s referred to as a contour, or forearm contour.


0

I've had this same problem in the past on one of my bridge saddles. My method of stopping it from happening repeatedly was to use Loctite thread dressing. I put a drop of Loctite on a disposable piece of paper, then removed the offending screw from the bridge saddle and dipped it into the drop of Loctite. With the threads of the screw still wet with Loctite, ...


1

One possibility is that you are releasing the string too slowly, so at some point, when the string is no longer pressed firmly against the fretboard, but not yet completely released, it buzzes against that fret. A similar buzz will happen if you are fretting a whole chord, but some of the strings are not pressed properly against the fretboard


0

As I understand the question, you play a chord or a note, and when you lift your finger/s it causes an open string to vibrate straight after. You might have sticky fingers, which will pull the string as you let go. You might be inadvertently doing a pull-off, and moving a finger slightly sideways as it comes away from a string. In very slo-mo, do what ...


0

If you only want to play the F, you have to stop the string from vibrating when you want the sound of F to stop. When a string is vibrating, it takes a few seconds to stop and if you release the note you are holding, it's quite understandable for the open string note to sound, because most likely the string won't stop vibrating! In addition to this, you ...


2

Reading the Wikipedia page for this item, the output impedance is rated at 10 k ohms. However, you cannot measure output impedance by sticking an ohmmeter across the leads. Simple things to check: is the full 9V showing on the battery output? When you turn up the gain & pluck strongly , what is the output voltage? -- Wiki says it's rated around 4.5 ...


1

By the sound of it, there is a reverse wiring issue. Hum getting louder when touching the strings rather than quieter is indicative of a ground connection accidentally being wired to output. If its only occurring on the neck pickup, it is likely that whoever opened the guitar last mistakenly wired the neck pickup's ground to the jack output, rather than the ...


0

I had to loosen the screws in the back till the bridge was parallel. For some reason the turning the screws on the front wasn't raising the bridge, but then I put on a different set of strings & then had to tighten the springs in the back & then loosen the screws on the front to raise the bridge up. It worked that time.


0

First of all you'll want to look down the length of the neck of the guitar to see if it is warped or twisted, a little bow in the neck can be corrected but a twisted neck will need replacement. Next you'll need to examine the bridge to make sure all parts are functional there. This includes the whammy bar mechanism located under the plate on the backside of ...


0

I don't know what caused the issue, but I know one possibe solution: you might have to loosen the springs at the back. Ideally the tension of the springs at the back should exactly balance the one from the strings, leaving your bridge flat. You would need to remove the cover at the back of your guitar and use a screwdriver to loosen the tension of the ...


1

'Sfortzando' is a word that works. I don't think there's a special term for everyone playing thus simultaneously, but on a score - yes, even for a small group - those notes would be marked as sf.


1

If it’s a little more force, an accent. If it has a lot of attack you could say it’s marcato. Although, if you want something a little less classical you could call it a “hit”.


1

Some things to consider are: play lots of chord tones or large interval leaps definitely look at combining downbeat rhythms with syncopation, a lot of downbeat rhythm can give it drive, but a few syncopations add contrast and energy hold the "chord" while the bass or second guitar changes to another chord, exploit the resulting dissonance (sort of like a ...


3

Quartal harmony may be something interesting to explore. I stumbled into it while studying Alan Holdworth, who uses quartal harmony to build arpeggios. I was always (and am still) fascinated by Holdsworth's note selections, arpeggios and scale runs. "Use of the terms quartal and quintal arises from a contrast, compositional or perceptual, with traditional ...


0

If you have an iPhone or iPad you can use garage band as a microphone and have your EarPods underneath the over ear headphones plugged into the amp. This is an odd solution that might seem dumb but if I had no way of acquiring any other equipment this is what I would have done.


0

My initial thought was practicing with only one headphone in so as to hear both the guitar and the vocals, but I haven't actually tried it to see if it works. On the other hand, Practicing unplugged Do you absolutely need to have the headphones? I was thinking you might actually want to try practicing unplugged (maybe on an acoustic, depending on who you ...


1

If you want to hear your voice through the headphones, it's going to be difficult to avoid using a microphone! You might be surprised at how cheaply you can buy a small mixer with inputs for guitar and mic. Look at the Berhinger stuff. Maybe no need to use the Fender amp at all - mixers generally have a headphone output.


2

Unless you have a specific reason to buy a 7-string, I'd advise buying a second 6-string to use for a different tuning - while you can use the same string gauges for, say, a drop-D tuning, you'll want to look at different string gauges for very different tunings. You still get better quality for your money with 6-strings. As @infinitezero commented, you ...


Top 50 recent answers are included