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1

If the pitch is getting lower, you will need to tighten the coils in the back of the guitar with a screwdriver. You will have to do some experimentation until you find the sweet spot that balances the tension between the front of the guitar caused by the strings and the tension on the back caused by the coils. They will probably need to be adjusted as well ...


2

The only way to not be a beginner is to try and practice these techniques. The technique you describe is one of many and no technique IMO is a purely beginner technique while others are "advanced". All techniques require diligent practice to master so just try and take your time.


1

I've had guitars - acoustic, electric and basses all hanging from headstock hooks for many years. Not had any problems with any. In your situation, I'd have a lightweight sheet, probably shaped in some way, to keep the dust off, but make it moments from lifting off the wall and playing. Not used the sort in the pics, but can't really see advantages over ...


4

Use whatever you can - left hand fingers that are free, right hand free fingers, palm, as much as possible. Using left hand fingers can work quite well, with the exception that there's always the possibility of producing harmonics. And let's face it, damping/muting is needed more when playing at higher volumes, which is when harmonics are trying to escape. ...


1

I have the same problem, with both LPs and Strats. I like the feel of Fender extra heavy small (jazz) picks, but the problem is horrible with the extra heavys. For me it's bad when playing loud, whether I'm using distortion or not. A compression box seems to help, but I also think practicing at high volume is helping me modify my string attack to reduce ...


1

I know this question is ancient, but I played as my main guitar for several years, a G&L Legacy modified with a Speedloader bridge and nut, and I loved it. To this day I am dismayed that Floyd Rose ditched the entire enterprise. You had great tuning stability without the need for Allen wrenches or the need to master the zen of tuning slightly below pitch ...


1

Wide Range, like the pickups in the 70s Fender Deluxe? Going by the Wikipedia page, you don't lose as much high end with them, but they require more winds and are bigger than PAF-based ones. For years, you could get ones from Fender that look like the 70s pickups, but they didn't have the CuNIFe magnets and didn't sound the same. I read online that only a ...


2

As others have said, volume isn’t the point. A 12-string guitar, whether acoustic or electric, is meant to achieve the chorus effect. Think about what a chorus pedal does. It delays the sound and mixes it with the original signal. It also detunes the signal and mixes it with the original signal. If it’s stereo chorus, it will mix up the detuned and delayed ...


1

Completely agree with Tim above. In case a helper sheet may be of use, here is my mine listing the modes, keys and chords. HTH - catz


0

A 12 string does sound fuller. And often the lowest four strings are tuned in octaves, adding to the bass fullness and depth.


1

This may well be perceived as a dupe - there are already lots of similar questions on this site. However - you consider A Dorian. Let's look at the notes from A dorian. A B C D E F♯ G. The chords for the song are A C G and D. There's certainly a 1 and 3 from each of those chords in the whole mode - C&E, G&B, D&F♯, but it doesn't bode so well for ...


9

The point is to hear courses of strings doubled either in octaves or unisons. It doesn't matter if it's electric or acoustic, you will hear the doubled strings. I don't think there will be much difference in volume. Actually, my impression is 12 string isn't as loud, because you can't "dig" the pick into the strings to strum as hard. There is less ...


15

The point isn't volume - several 12 string guitars I've had have been no louder than the 6ers. Doubling of strings isn't actually it. It's only the top two which are doubled. The lower four are actually octaves, making the highest string the octave G - 3 semitones higher than the open top strings. When playing on the bottom strings, then, instead of single ...


1

Your second photo makes it very evident what the problem is - the pivot point shout be on the neck of that screw, not against the thread, and it should be screwed properly in to the body of the guitar. I have highlighted the problem here: With the blade pivoting on the screw thread, turning it will just grind away the metal, and will not adjust the height. ...


0

Try searching YouTube for "adjust floyd rose tremolo" YouTube has a ton of electric guitar how-tos, and it can be daunting finding one to suit a specific situation. Here is one I've watched myself that explains how to change strings and make adjustments, but you should be able to find quite a few other fine how-tos on adjusting a Floyd Rose bridge. ...


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