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I have a Vox Amplug and while I found it useful for traveling it's not the best at home. About a month ago I bought a Yamaha THR10 amp - small, cheap(ish), will run on batteries if you want, but a great sound with or without headphones. They have just released an all-new model so you may find the last of the previous models for bargain prices. I bought ...


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A high nut can cause intonation issues on the first 3 or more frets and be perfect at the 12th


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I own a few practice amps/devices including the amPlug, orange crush and line 6 amplifi. They are all fine, but it depends on how YOU like to practice. Opinions aside, if you want to hear yourself play and you don't have any space and no budget, then the amPlugs actually sound good. Like you said, they are limited especially if you're looking for the chug ...


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I took a slightly different route to getting proficient at leads and soloing, and I actually ended up creating a guide book called "PentaBox Overlay Method: Guitar Soloing Drastically Simplified". The idea is this: Take the basic 1st position minor pentatonic scale pattern, and overlay it onto different degrees of the diatonic scale (ie. the full major and ...


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If you can play scales, that's not much. Think of it this way: a keyboard player gets the scales of the white keys as given. They also get the pentatonic scales of the black keys as given. Hit only white keys, or only black keys ... good music? Scales are just a frame of reference to build actual music on. For some reason, guitarists think that they have ...


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When you can do what you say, the next step is to find others to play with. Form a band. Guitars are one of very few instruments which can be used for ingle note playing and chords. So make yourself familiar with chords. Major, minor, dominant 7, major and minor 7, will see you through most pop type songs. In this band, there may be another guitarist, with ...


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Do you just "go up and down the scale" w/o any musical context? Learning scales first, and that's what it seems like you are saying, probably isn't necessary. A better approach would be to learn some songs that you like that are not too difficult. That will give the scales context. Musical patterns are more conducive to learning than straight scale ...


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There are two ways to go, that I'm aware of. Either have a pro set up your guitar for you, or learn to do it yourself. If you choose to learn to do it yourself, you might enroll in a luthier training program or choose to learn from a book. I've used a book by Dan Erlewine as a guide for learning to set up my own guitars. He explains the process clearly and ...


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You get what you pay for. I see a lot of kudos for some online videos and the like, and I'm sure there are good teachers that try to do online stuff and put effort into making it good. But mastering the guitar is also about mastering your own body. I personally would not advise anyone to start or stay with online resources until they've had some training ...


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Locking nuts are solid chunks of metal which affects the tone of the open strings; possibly the player likes how the open strings sound with a locking nut. It's easy to adjust the string action at the first fret with a locking nut: the locking nut comes off with simple screws that go through the neck (no glue), and a shim can be inserted between it and the ...


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It's because his signature model uses a blocked Floyd Rose trem, basically. He keeps the locking nut and bridge fine tuners like a FR guitar would have, but the bridge itself doesn't move. This is probably because he has always used locking trem systems, and it's more personal preference. He doesn't technically need the locking nut and could tune at the ...


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Having the part of the string which could move trapped with a clamp, it obviates any movement that's likely to happen - and that would be behind the nut, particularly round the posts, which after all should be wound properly - e.g. tight and secure. Possibly a case of belt and braces - and a piece of string, just in case! Must make re-tuning a pain when it ...


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If you bend strings a lot, or hit them with aggressive strumming you can pull them out of tune on the post quite easily by disturbing the string wrappings, especially if they are coiled untidily. Comment : Doesnt that video show a floating bridge though ?


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One of the methods a person may use to magnetically charge a pickup pole when winding your own pickups is to stroke the pole with a strong magnet and the pole becomes magnetized itself by this action. With that thought in mind, I would advise caution about playing with a valued pickup and an external magnet, because you can also reverse the polarity and or ...


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By crikey this is broad… Half of any guitarist's sound is the guitarist, the rest is a combination of guitar, effects [if any] & amp/speaker structure. How long do you have to learn all this?? If you've 6 months, get a modelling amp/pedal, an old Line 6 will do a lot. An old Zoom will be cheaper, but you'll outgrow it rapidly. I recently threw an old ...


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Take the bar off - does it stop? Most common cause is the actual whammy bar rattling in its thread. Fix is a few turns of PTFE tape on the thread before you screw it in, available from any hardware/plumbing store. Don't use sticky tape of any kind. PTFE is "teflon" & won't stick or jam. If that's not it, you're going to have to give us better ...


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Yeah don’t loosen those screws, just tighten them. A lot. You should see the claw (that the screws go through) move like 1/4” towards the wood. Before you tighten the claw screws, loosen the strings. Then, don’t be shy about tightening that claw. If you’ve loosened the strings then you can tighten the claw until the bridge is to low. Then when you tune the ...


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It depends on how familiar you are with harmony, how complex the chords are, what kind of distortion they use, the style of the music and countless other aspects, but these tips may help you: Try to locate the tonic of each chord. Try to play the chords as power chords or triads. Most songs that use very distorted chords employs basic power chords and ...


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Ever heard the old joke about the farmer being asked how to get to a nearby famous landmark? There are a hundred versions of it, but there's one commonality... His reply is always, "Well, you don't want to start from here…" The thing about GAS* is that it's the wrong place to start. You have a Strat - live with it for now. When you get 'good' you'll know ...


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I don't think you can really say. It depends on the specific instruments. Either way, you should definitely play the one you want to play the most, otherwise you'll have less incentive to practice and improve. Slaps and pops are louder on the bass than playing finger style, but a non-resonant bass played with slapping is likely to be quieter than a resonant ...


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You might not have meant it literally, but you probably don't want to get into the habit of genuinely practicing unamplified, as not hearing the signal you're producing doesn't give you any feedback on whether you're playing evenly, muting well, etc, Do use headphones plugged in to an amp, or a multieffect unit with a headphone out. In terms of what you'd ...


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If it's slapped and popped, the bass will be louder than the guitar. On the latter, you'll be strumming chords, or playing riffs, but it will be slightly quieter than a bass played in the way you describe. But you will still want to hear what it really sounds like, so will need an amp. with a headphone socket anyway, although that won't upset the neighbours. ...


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I read an article a few years ago by Eric Clapton's guitar tech that stated He was only allowed to change a string when it broke. Doing strings this way minimized the brightness effect that happens when a complete set of strings is changed on a regular basis. For someone who plays on a regular basis, I find it doesn't take very long for my strings to lose ...


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