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Wood-to-wood contact is ideal. I seriously doubt the stickers are making a discernible difference in sound, but YMMV. If you do decide to remove them, you may find that the tilt of the neck relative to the body has been altered -- it takes less than a millimeter at the joint to adversely affect the angle and therefore playability. Do this with caution and ...


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It takes precision to place the nut at the correct location, however, say a guitar neck maker were to produce in many or mass quantities necks for a certain kind of guitar. That maker would not have to be concerned with the exact placement of the nut. The maker would simply add a fret at that correct location (negligible cost) then install a nut behind it. ...


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I had a similar problem with picking to strumming dynamics and a small problem with volume when putting effect on and off but not as much. Mainly my lead lines were not as loud/clear as rhythm stuff. My old chain was the following because I read that low gain to high gain works well. I did balance the volume as best I could but it just didn't feel great ...


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Here's some ipython notebooks that stream an audio waveform from a soundcard into matplotlib for a real-time viz. It uses PyAudio and struct (to uncompress the byte stream into waveform integers) https://github.com/markjay4k/Audio-Spectrum-Analyzer-in-Python sound.stackexchange.com sounds more appropriate for me going forward, thanks for the rec!


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One solution that is somewhat controversial among amp owners is called a Power soak. I've known some guitarists who have used them and had no problems with their amps, but I've also heard horror stories about players burning up their output transformers while using them. If you choose to use one, I recommend doing so judiciously. Understand it's always ...


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It's important to realise that a gain control knob works in principle in exactly the same way as a volume control knob: it regulates the signal level. The only difference is that a gain control is located at the front end of the amplifier circuit, a volume control at the back – i.e., a gain knob regulates the signal level inside the amplifier circuit, the ...


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There are a lot of unknown factors here. You say it doesn't work when you go guitar -> G3XN -> amp, but you didn't mention going straight guitar -> amp (no effects loop), set at the same comfortable level. The master volume can have a big effect as well. Generally speaking, low gain high master volume will result in a clean signal at a given volume. High ...


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Hm! lovely! that's a mixture of Dire Straits and Hank Marvin :-) I'd go for .. A reverb A mild delay as well Probably a compressor New bright-sounding strings An excellent & very clean playing technique


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Reverb. That's all that's on it. Actually, after comments, there is a single delay repeat on it too - so quiet I didn't spot it to start with. The rest is just a very simple clean Strat sound, front pickup. It doesn't hurt at all that he plays it well. I was trying to find some earlier refs for a historically similar sound, but basically it's a brighter, ...


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To be quite honest, I think a metronome would serve most beginners better than pedals. Being able to press a button and get a different sound is fun but doesn't do much to help you grow musically. And note that some exceptional, world class guitarists (for example Derek Trucks) eschew the use of pedals altogether. Nothing wrong with doing stuff to make ...


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Even though your amp provides built-in effects, it is very convenient to have the same effects as pedals so you can turn them on and off. Another reason is that you can change the order of the effects. For example, distortion into delay is very different from delay into distortion. Some basic types to consider include the ones you've already mentioned, ...


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slighly distorted, yet very clean and fat tone Sounds like a general Blues tone. On any amp or FX circuit, look for a "gain" or "overdrive" knob/function. If you have a circuit with "pre" and "post" gain options, you can turn the "pre" down and crank the "post" to overdrive the tubes naturally. On a Fender Blues Junior tube combo these are called "master" (...


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Chords are meant to support melody rather than dictate melody. This is something that many musicians get backwards when they first start improv. Joe Pass, for example, would play beautiful melodic lines that defined chords progressions. It takes time to learn but there isn't a lot of variety in western music. For some musicians a drone chord or vamp is ...


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Improvisation is live composing, and composing is slow improvisation. If you haven't been given instructions on what to do, you have to make it up yourself. Whatever you don't have, you make up. If you don't have a rhythm, you imagine a rhythm. If you don't have chords, you imagine chords. But you think you do have chords? ... over just a chord repeating ...


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Yes I have a Takamine , when I got it the action was very low but with no buzz or any thing ,after a few month, noticed it was a lot higher The neck was not to bad , anyway I had a go at tightening the rod ,but it seamed fully tightened .so I loosened off all of the strings and got a bit on it , but the action is no we’re near to what it was , I think next ...


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Ok, so after a few weeks I figured it out! Changing the Buffer Sizes did absolutely nothing for me. What I did though, is changing the driver type to ASIO and my device to Focusrite USB ASIO. Then I plugged my speakers into the Focusrite, and I can now play and record without any delay!


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At the risk of the answers to this question being too opinion-based, it appears the golden-age of the Les Paul Jr was during the years of it's original production 1954-1963. This would be ignoring the later reissues and variations. I base this statement on this article, from vintageguitar.com, in which took place a friendly contest in order to determine ...


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I agree with 3d12's answer. I just want to add that in addition to your local music store, one way to go, without totally breaking the bank, is to invest in a multi-effects pedal. Years ago, when I was starting off with guitar, I picked up a Vox Tonelab LE. It was a great, great tool for a long time. This sort of multi-pedal can be very customizable, I spent ...


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This is a great question. You're right that some guitarists get very specific about the type of guitar and amp that they use with specific pedals, but for your purposes, you won't need to get that in-depth about sculpting your sound right away. Once you start learning what different effects do, you'll know when you've outgrown the ones you have. So until ...


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Good question. In general the answer is no, you do not need the thumb to be curled up to bend. However, this depends on the gauge string, set up of the guitar, and your experience. On the flip side I think the "standard" or "correct" way to hold the neck is a bit misunderstood. Physics can help understand what is going on. First of all note that this ...


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The easiest way to do this is probably to use an audio interface. An audio interface lets you plug in a 1/4" jack and connect the interface to your computer using USB. The interface can convert analog to digital signal, and vice versa. It looks something like this.


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Great answers all around. The simple truth is this; There are no set rules for how you place your fingers or thumb while phrasing chords, hammering on, or even bending strings. Whatever works for you, and that which achieves a clean, satisfying sound is YOUR technique. The trick is to keep your elbows, wrists, and fingers free and unencumbered whilst ...


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I agree with Tim. Also, me personally, I tend to always have my thumb over top of the neck and use a rotary motion with my wrist (which I can’t do with my thumb on the back of the neck as well) instead of a pulling my fingers down with a stiff wrist. But different fingering positions can change that.


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You've just made me pick up a guitar and do some bending! Personally, sometimes my thumb is in the centre at the back, sometimes it's almost over the top of the neck (close to the fat E), and sometimes it's not actually on the neck at all - it's pointing away from me, under the neck! You might have been told thumb in the middle of the neck is the correct ...


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The question of whether to have a tremolo on a Strat is complicated by the fact that a tremolo changes how a Strat sounds, even if you don't use it. The springs in the back add a kind of natural reverb that won't be there on a hardtail. Eric Clapton and Pete Townshend never use the tremolo bar on their Strats but still play trem-equipped models for exactly ...


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In general, the quality of a guitar (wood selection, construction tolerances, pickups) will be more important to creating a good clean sound than if there are a bunch of effects applied. Not saying a Squier can't do it, but e.g. something made out of plywood would not be ideal.


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This is virtually asking for gear recommendations - which is offside for this site. However, it has more of the sound of an acoustic or electro-acoustic guitar than a solid electric. Most guitars heard on tracks have some sort of effects used on them, whereas this has maybe a little reverb and that's it. The sound of any guitar being played is contributed ...


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You can do that with almost any electric guitar. That's what an electric guitar sounds like when you don't add any effects. You'll want to look for an amplifier that has a "clean channel", i.e. one without effects.


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Although I don't see many of them in use, Fender has made a separate spring reverb unit that usually stacked on top of an amplifier with a footswitch on the floor to engage or disengage the unit. It can be used to obtain the classic spring reverb effect without having to purchase another amplifier. I have one in my effects collection and it works very nicely....


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