New answers tagged

1

I general, the main difference between the bass and guitar amp is that the speaker on the bass amp is more durable. Often bass amps wont have good high frequencies, but it wont harm a bass amp to plug a guitar into it. Usually the amplifier circuits are pretty similar and its usually the speaker that is the main issue. Because guitar amps aren’t designed ...


0

Yes. Normal. What you're hearing is the peaks and valleys of the sound waves misaligning. If your guitar is slightly out of tune and you play the same "note" in two locations (like "A" on your open "A string" + "A" at the 5th fret of your "E string") you will hear this wobble more clearly. Some may also describe it as a Leslie effect (rotating speaker ...


4

There just isn't a simple graph that could be made - time played against ability to play. Every single person's would be very different! And then there's actual playing ability. Playing any of those songs, do you nail it every time? Could you sit in with other musos and play a song perfectly every time? Would it take you an hour or a month to learn, say, ...


0

For what it's worth. I play my guitar through a MagicStomp pedal, then into a Fender Mustang 2 Moddleing amp. My CD Walkman is put through a small mixer and then out with XLR to a PA speaker. I just have to adjust the loudness of it to match the Amp. I can use headphones also.


-1

Added a Cable with Higher Amps worked fine afterwards


-2

You should be able to use the electric guitar with a bass amp (Example: Josh Homme) I use my bass guitar at home with a guitar amp, but if I load it, the speaker may be damaged. Be careful, too.


2

What are some things I should consider when arranging guitar parts in songs with two guitars? Rock guitar arrangement tends to be for "lead" and "rhythm" guitar; this is not universally true, especially if you dig into particular subgenres, but it's a relatively safe way of doing things. Rhythm guitar forms part of the "rhythm section" with the bass and ...


0

It appears you've lost the nut on your output jack, so you'll need to find a replacement nut. Talk to the repair tech at your music shop, he has probably got a few extras. You might ask for a matching lock washer and flat washer to go with the nut. Once that has been accomplished you may reassemble by following these steps. First put the lock washer on the ...


4

I've found the hardest thing about learning guitar is getting over that first hump. It can be physically painful while building finger strength. That along with progressing quickly enough to maintain interest are the biggest hurdles. I originally attacked the physical end with simple exercises. They build strength and flexibility to place your fingers ...


2

Voicings are about spacing of the notes of a chord into different octaves and sometimes doubling some of them. Inversions are about what is the lowest note. This example on Wikipedia has several different voicings for a C major chord. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voicing_%28music%29#Vertical_placement If instead of C, say, E was the lowest note, then it ...


2

Really hard to tell from those photos, but is this bit threaded? If so, you've lost the nut that goes on the outside. Any guitar shop should be able to find you one. After comments: I've never had a socket come loose twice. Tighten it properly, it'll never happen again. Bit of superglue on the thread might help too, if you struggle to reach in properly - ...


2

Bear in mind that the albums are often double tracked and or have things like stereo separation effects that alter the sound from the way the band actually plays a song live. Also, microphones play a bigger role in recorded tone than average people credit. Cobain was not known for a ton of effects: clearly he used tremolo and phaser/flanger effects on ...


3

I think to sound more rocky you don’t need any special or different pentatonic scale but what you need is a different rhythm and and different chords like e.g. the Beatles used in Sgt. Pepper ...


2

If you play the so, la, do, re, mi (like D,E,G,A,B in G- major) above the chords of a key that's a minor third lower (in this case E7) you have a pentatonic scale that fits well as blues or rock scale to this harmony: we have D=7th, E= root, G= minor 3rd, A= 4th, B= 5th. (you can bend the A to a b5 and create another blue note.)


1

The "blues scale" is just a minor pentatonic scale with a b5 or #4 (depending on how you want to spell the half step between the 4th and 5th scale degrees, I think most use b5.) A lot of classic hard rock actual uses the flat fifth. Welcome to the Jungle and Jamie's Cryin come to mind. It's one of the evolutionary links between rock and blues. But if you ...


2

Not sure what constitutes 'blues pentatonic' - maybe minor pent? But in general use in rock is that minor pent. Along with the major pent. which is often used alongside its partner. The same goes for the actual 'Blues' scales, and their notes. Both minor and major blues notes are played in a lot of that style of music, mixing and matching. The more notes ...


2

I used the PocketPOD for live gigs several times and it is not ideal for it. It does not have footswith, plastic cursor switches are tiny and fragile. I also had problem with hum that was generated by PocketPOD when light dimmers were on even though I used ground isolated DI box. If you need to change the sound during the song you may connect PocketPOD to ...


1

You can learn all the things you mention from TAB too. TAB is just one way to express information. The standard is Standard Music Notation, which is equal across all instruments. That allows you to read sax or piano music as well. I personally think all beginning music students should learn SMN but TAB is an other avenue. TAB does take some decision ...


2

I want to piggyback on what's been said already. The Rolls SX21 is an awesome, small and wonderful tool to split your bass signal. I am doing things a little different though I am splitting the input between a GK 250w 1X12 and a TC Electronic 250w 2X10. But, the thing that I like to do different is use the 2X10 for the lows (under 200hz) and the 1X12 for the ...


0

I'm using a Thomastik JS111 set in a 335 clone guitar. Love them, but they're also the only flatwounds I ever tried. Anyway, the strings are so nice I don't even want to try anything else. Disclaimer: I'm not a jazz guitarist, or guitarist, by any means. It's just a hobby thing I like to do.


1

Personally, seeing the wires wouldn't particularly concern me - other pics I can find online of similar models (1,2) seem to also show a cheeky bit of wire peeping out. I was thinking about using a pointy blunt object to push the wires in I wouldn't do that. If it's something that you find particularly offputting in terms of presentation, you might want ...


2

This is absolutely not a problem, unless you object to the cosmetic appearance. Some pickups have that extra loop there to add extra relief to lower the risk of snapping the wires when removing/replacing pickups. If you pop the back off or remove strings and pop the pickup out, you may be able to reroute the wires if you want to. Or you could get some ...


2

Leave it alone - you'll probably break something. They're meant to be like that. Basically, that's where the coil wires are tagged onto the thicker wires needed to carry the signal off to the volume & tone pots. The short loops you can see are where the thicker wires are dropped through the pickup base to provide a stronger structure, strain relief when ...


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