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-1

It is a Fender because it has fender on the headstock. It even has Strat guitar on the headstock. Anyone who says it is not a strat is in snob denial. Blame Fender.


2

it´s always helpful to record yourself and listen to it afterwards. You will detect much more when listening to yourself while not playing.


2

You don't have to hear every beat. You have to hear every main beat, and know from slow practice that you are playing four picks to the beat. Practice like this: (1) Just the downbeats. (2) half-speed (in your case, 8ths); (3) sixteenths.


4

Four subdivisions of 160 is definitely possible to keep track of with the ear and with the body. It's certainly not impossible even to count out loud, though it becomes a bit silly and slurred into "WututhrifoWututhrifo." There does come a point where things start to blur together, often right around the point also where our body just can't make ...


8

That tempo is, arguably, too fast to count (is a bit above 10 notes per second). But you don't need to literally count (out loud or otherwise) to hear whether you played 2, 3, 4, or more notes... you need to train your ear on what groupings of 2, 3, 4, or more notes sound like. You need to become familiar with these rhythms at a slower tempo, a tempo where ...


0

Your guitar will not be damaged by leaving it with broken strings. The tension difference won't have any affect, even for long periods of time. Solid body guitars especially can withstand a very wide range of tension put on them, and less or no tension won't change them at all.


2

Never had any problems leaving one string off for a short time, so I'd say it's o.k. Particularly if the guitar concerned has a trussrod. There is a way round it, though. Buy more strings than you need at that time - so you'll always have extra for situationss like this. Guitar strings are sacrificial - they're not meant to last as long as the guitar - and ...


2

It will probably be just fine for 2 weeks. You may want to loosen the other strings a bit if they have jumped sharp. (Not as likely with a fixed bridge as it would be with a floating bridge.) It's actually recommended to reduce the tension on a guitar that will be stored. For example, Fender suggests loosening all the strings by two half-steps.


3

The toothpick is definitely the first thing to consider, but let me add to that. It sounds like your basic problem is that the hole is too big. Adding a toothpick can change the direction of the hole or cause it to be off-set. I would consider 3 options (just think of these as tools in your mind's toolkit). If the tooth pick is too large, use a sharp ...


0

By far the simplest will be a pickguard. It can be whatever shape and size you think fit, and colour and material will be choices too. The damaged area looks pretty flat, but if the pickguard needed to go close to the edge, it could have a spacer under it at the point it gets screwed onto the body. The existing holes could then be opened up to allow the body ...


3

I think Theodore’s answer of a custom pick guard is a good one but I have another idea that I think would also work. Maybe you can get two large washers similar to the ones used for the pickup switch on a Les Paul to attach over the holes and mount the pots on them. Find a diameter that covers the holes. This way more of the original finish would be visible. ...


7

This is a relatively simple repair if you don't mind that the guitar doesn't end up looking the same as it did new: Drill out the damaged parts of the wood. Add a pickguard with the slot for the switch in the same position and the holes for the potentiometers in approximately the same positions. If you can't find a standard product that matches, you will ...


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