11

As long as you use it at a reasonable level you should be fine (no guarantee is offered by me though!) Remember bass amps can not only handle lows but can also handle the high frequency and percussive sounds of slapping and popping too. Here is an article with some good tips and precautions for using a bass amp with electronic drums: https://musicianshq.com/...


8

It'll be fine. It's actually a better bet than a guitar amp - the sound spectrum is far wider. It's the choce of several electronic drummers I know. The obvious is that you'll wreck any amp (specifically the speaker) by playing it way too loud. I used a Carlsboro Viper (15" speaker, no tweeter) 100w in the studio for a good few years with electronic ...


7

To be clear about what we are talking about, this is an electronic drum set: There are other ways to generate sounds that function as drums in a music production, including drum machines and several different kinds of software. This answer will not be about those. For the sake of anyone curious and reading about this who does not know much about electronic ...


6

Yes, your normal headphones will work fine. When somebody says "monitor headphones" or "monitor speakers", it typically just means that they're calibrated for accuracy—the kind of accuracy you'd want for mixing music rather than just listening to it. Consumer-grade gear, on the other hand, tends to hype the bass and sometimes the treble a little bit. But any ...


6

The usual fix for that is to adjust the spring tension &/or the beater post length. As that doesn't appear to have either, then I'd suggest jamming another bit of soft foam in the way, to slow up the oscillation.


5

Using Hot Rods would help a lot: They feel a lot more like using drum sticks, than using brushes, but are much quieter. (I'm a big fan of getting "enthusiastic" young drummers I work with to use them, especially in small rehearsal spaces!)


4

The TD-17 is different from the TD-12 in several ways, but there are two ways it is different that are important for you. First, the trigger connections are different. On the TD-12, there is a separate 1/4" trigger input for each trigger channel. On the TD-17, there is a single "multicore" cable (I believe the connector is a DB-25) that breaks out into ...


4

First off, you shouldn't be discouraged to continue playing over not being able to play patterns you haven't worked on before. New patterns are generally going to be very difficult at first because you haven't built up the muscle memory necessary to be able to play it effortlessly. This was true for me when I started playing drums over 20 years ago and it's ...


4

Practicing with multi pads is not a bad idea, it's a great idea. You can actually just practice on a cheap, portable, (affordably ship-able) practice pad to learn stick control for rhythmic accuracy, relative dynamics, and hitting a small target (this is important because eventually you'll want to hit a specific point on a drum head to get a certain sound, ...


4

When it comes to electronic drums, aim for the sticks that feel best for you. While you're not currently using an acoustic drum set, you won't need to worry about the differences in tone between nylon tips, barrel tips, etc. Especially if you're a beginner, you'll just want to find a pair that's most comfortable to you. I use American Classic 5A's when I ...


4

He's using a couple pads from an electronic drumset, like these: The pads are then connected to an electronic drum module, like this: The drum module is what produces the specific sounds. And there are a variety of brands and models in different price ranges so you should be able to find something within your budget. Roland is a great brand for ...


4

I'm just going to add on to some of the already decent answers here. In your head you need to separate the idea that playing with energy means playing loud. Intensity and energy can happen even at very soft dynamics. But most importantly, I'm not sure you're asking the right question, it sounds like you want to find sticks or techniques that allow you to ...


4

Consumer audio products like the "sound bars" you mentioned are made for applications where precise timing is less important. Whether there's a 2.5 ms or a 25 ms delay between the input and the output isn't really important for music playback or even TV. These products often combine analog and digital audio sources, and the easiest way to add e.g. ...


3

There are some good answers for managing volume if you must use an acoustic kit. However in your question you also asked about an electronic kit (I'm not sure why they don't call them digital). I know you mentioned the absence of mic or speakers, but also mentioned a digital piano which means you will have speakers for the piano. I have a band that plays ...


3

With smooth jazz drumming the key is to play silent but technical. If you are worried about overpowering the band, try using sticks that are lighter, it makes the cymbals have less sustain. I would suggest some 8A sticks, regal tip or nylon tip. As you can see the 8A series are practically made for jazz. They are a significantly lighter stick and are ...


3

Many of the considerations in choosing a drumstick do not apply when playing solely on an electronic set. However, there are a few considerations. First, the most obvious characteristic of drumsticks to most people is the size. You don't have to care about how the size of the stick you choose affects the volume, but it's a good idea to stay with a drumset ...


3

Use whatever the studio has. Use their engineer to set it up. If they already have a studio kit, consider using that instead.* Their engineer will be very familiar with it. The time to be learning how to mic up a large drum kit in a room you don't know with mics you don't know is not now. You will not get it right in a week, maybe not even a month. It ...


2

First, understand that electronic drums main selling point is they aren't as loud as acoustic drums. The common consensus is to use acoustic drums if you can. Still, I have gotten noise complaints with electric kits in an apartment if there's someone underneath you who may be able to hear the kick pedal being stomped on. Disadvantages of using electric ...


2

It's a good precaution. Your mileage may vary. High quality equipment tends to be designed (or amended) in a way where its output does not go nuts when turned off. But that's not a hard/reliable rule. You can turn the amp volume down to "almost off" to make a first try if the convenience of switching order is important to you. There are also power ...


2

The items in the previous post I call bundle sticks, which is a good option, but I think they are still pretty loud. How about regular jazz brushes? These are VERY quiet. I have also put masking tape on the cymbals and the hi-hat cymbals as well. Using a pillow for the bass drum is a good idea.


2

A common way to solve this is to have a drum shield (often made of plexi glass) in front of the set to stop some of the sound from reaching out.


2

Ableton Certified Trainer here. There's a few things you need to have a look at in order to get your drums working properly. If your drum kit is showing up in your Preferences > MIDI area, you need to ensure that the "Track" option is enabled for the kit. This means that Ableton Live will receive note data from the drum kit. The other two options are "...


2

It sounds like a sample being played faster than originally recorded. There are a couple of videos on Youtube that feature the intro played back at different speeds: Coldplay Charlie Brown Intro Slowed Down Coldplay - The Secret of Charlie Brown Intro Beyond that, the sample is washed out with a lush reverb, set with a pretty much 100% wet/effected ...


2

Adding to Tekkerue's answer, electronic drum modules (my Yamaha works well, and wasn't expensive: the joys of second hand) have MIDI ports, so can be wired to other sound modules to give just about any sound on earth, using the drums as triggers, which is, after all, what they are. Rather like a lot of synthesisers and work stations make drum sounds when ...


2

Jay Huggins' answer makes a lot of good points. I like to add something that might be important to you as a parent to know. Having followed lessons for around 16 years I'm not ashamed to say that the first part of learning drums is the most boring part. That is, if you do it the way you should: basic rhythms, rudiments, the like. Only after you've mastered ...


2

Likely the best bet is a USB audio interface that supports line level input and has a gain control. USB mixers are generally mixers with a built-in audio interface. This will certainly work, but may be a larger thing than you need/want. Cheap USB interfaces often don't have any gain control, but it may also be possible to adjust the volume of the output on ...


2

Its web site says: *Specifically designed for V-Drums; compatible with any Roland V-Drums kit. That does not actually rule out other devices. Note number: corresponds to the pads of the V-Drums series MIDI channel: 10 This appears to imply that any MIDI drum that sends these note numbers on channel 10 can be used. * A Roland V-Drums series drum ...


2

Probably not harmful as such. In fact, you may find a particular grip suits your playing best. I don't believe every drummer holds his sticks in exactly the same way - basically, yes, but there will be subtle differences, due to different physiology, different wrist actions, etc. So, feel free to experiment. But bear in mind that the basic grip(s) have been ...


1

Could I take a different route?... Why spend the money, especially if you're not actually a drummer? Two passes on a keyboard, one for the top of the kit & one for the kick drum. Quick edit to remove any obvious glitches or 3-handedness & you're done. Couple of examples done this way - you'll probably hate them, but just listen to the drums ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible