11

As long as you use it at a reasonable level you should be fine (no guarantee is offered by me though!) Remember bass amps can not only handle lows but can also handle the high frequency and percussive sounds of slapping and popping too. Here is an article with some good tips and precautions for using a bass amp with electronic drums: https://musicianshq.com/...


8

It'll be fine. It's actually a better bet than a guitar amp - the sound spectrum is far wider. It's the choce of several electronic drummers I know. The obvious is that you'll wreck any amp (specifically the speaker) by playing it way too loud. I used a Carlsboro Viper (15" speaker, no tweeter) 100w in the studio for a good few years with electronic ...


1

I would suggest including: Instrument name (kick, snare, hi-hat...) Instrument characteristics (e.g. brand and size) Articulation, if applicable (tip, edge, 1/2 open hi-hat...) For pitched instruments, note name Layer (velocity). Note the libraries often include more samples in loud volume range, as they are believed to be more frequently used, for round ...


1

You need to figure out what will be the defining characteristics for you. That's something nobody else can answer. In what way will the samples that you make be an addition to the millions of samples you can already find and buy and uniquely identify them? And how do you plan on using them? If for you it's all about genres, e.g. you want to have a basic set ...


1

I'm not sure of anything from an actual teaching perspective, but if you are looking for fun Guitar Hero style learning, then check out the game Rock Band because it also includes drums. You can use any electronic drum set with a little bit of setup. Here is a video showing how to make it work:


1

If the TD-11 is like the TD-15 (which I have and just tested this with), and you're connecting it to your computer via USB, the TD drum module is an audio interface. It provides both stereo audio input and output. You connect your headphones to the TD module and use the TD module as the audio output (AND input) in your computer's DAW software. You may need ...


1

Sound Control Panel, checked "Listen to this device" This is most likely going to use the Windows WDM/directsound and "in shared mode" which tends to have a lot of latency. For recording and playing you will want to use a low-latency driver: look for a Roland-provided ASIO driver or use ASIO4ALL (freeware). You will need software that ...


1

You can connect direct via usb lead to your computer from your TD11. I've just started this but have now stumbled across the issue of additional latency (compared to my existing minilab midi controller) and it not have a 'v drums' allocation in the midi control interface when in the 'link midi' preferences. Good luck


1

This is probably impossible. The V-drum is connected with a computer via USB. If your computer specialist and you are able to convert your midi output to a USB input. Than maybe it is possible. Oh, I did not read the previous commend. Is there also v-drum without USB? If so than maybe not impossible?


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