8

This has been done, at least as an experiment. There's a paper Artificial buzzing lips and brass instruments: Experimental results (pdf download link) in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America describing how they did this for a trombone mouthpiece. Mechanical saxophone embouchures have been done before as well. Here's one playing John Coltrane's ...


7

Absolutely. JB Arban once said that people have the wrong idea about embouchure - that it's a fixed thing like a statue. He said that embouchure is fluid - you need to do what's right and what sounds good. I am not surprised that you have difficulties with flute after trombone; remember how each instrument works: The flute is like a fickle bottle - you ...


7

Breath control, breath control, breath control! I recall one of the top University Marching Band directors talking to us (Midwestern Music & Art Camp circa 1970 :-) ) about his "aha" moment. He was a trumpeter & got a summer job (high school or college age for him) with a circus orchestra. First couple performances, his embouchure collapsed half-...


5

This is a personal thing and there's no universal answer. I play trumpet with a slightly upward angle, and I know great players who play with all sorts of angles. That being said, it seems like most pros do push their jaws out. Doing some Google image searching, you'll see that top players usually play straight out (Wynton Marsalis), upwards (Wayne ...


5

If it hurts, it's wrong. Many players can play higher octaves all evening without pain. But to diagnose what exactly is wrong, someone would need to see and hear you playing. If you're lucky, posting a video would work. But more likely, you need a teacher or a more experienced colleague in the room with you to ask you to try different things and observe ...


4

There is no doubt that you don't have sufficient breath control here. I have experienced similar problems (clarinet, sax) as have friends on brass instruments while learning and improving our breathing & diaphragm control. When your lips or jaw get fatigued, stop and rest. But above all, my oft-used directive on Music.SE applies: Get Thee To A ...


4

The common wisdom I got from the brass faculty at my university was: You won't be able to make an informed choice on a mouthpiece until you're skilled enough that you can tell whether it's the mouthpiece making the difference. In other words, a mouthpiece might make a 5% difference to your playing (within reason—we're excluding very unusual mouthpieces ...


4

Sax and clarinet are extremely similar in both embouchure and fingering. There would be a tremendous amount of skill transfer if you were to switch. That being said, soprano is sort of a side member of the saxophone family. Lots of music that calls for saxophones doesn't call for soprano. It would be more practical (and cheaper) to start on alto. my ...


3

I play (with varying degrees of success) basically all of the winds. It may take some time to get used to switching between the two, but ultimately this shouldn't be a problem. The one thing that will change is that as you get better at trumpet, your embouchure will get stronger, so you'll have to relax more for single reeds. However, this will be a very ...


3

I once had a student with a pronounced "cupids bow" (as they call it). He was never able to get a clear sound and eventually had to give up the flute. But whether or not you can do it probably depends on the exact shape of your lips and their musculature. Have you tried making the hole to one side of the middle? My advice would be to try that for a while, ...


3

Leaking air out of the sides of the embouchure is a really bad habit to get into if you also play real wind instruments. It can be audibly distracting and it's also totally unnecessary. Oboe players have exactly the same problem that not enough air goes through the instrument. They cope by exhaling at the end of a phrase to empty the lungs before inhaling, ...


2

It's a slog. I did the same thing a year or two back. Although I didn't carry on with flute, I did get to the point where I could get a reasonably decent tone. The exercise I found most helpful was one that you can find on YouTube, described by James Galway. He recommends simply playing octaves on the headjoint. The idea is to do it without blowing harder - ...


2

1. Hearing If you know how the part is supposed to sound (either because you've heard it before, or because you can read music sufficiently well to hear the melody in your head), then you can obviously notice when the sound you play does not match. It can be a problem if you are playing in a very loud ensemble and can't really hear yourself (think 3rd ...


2

This really depends upon how proficient you want to be at the clarinet and saxophone or trumpet. The problem is tonal consistency. If you play clarinet and saxophone well you can mess up your tone by switching back and forth. Mainly because you are training muscle groups to act together. This would be one of those examples of the "Jack of all trades" ...


2

My wife was a flutist through elementary school and middle school and was the first freshman to play in wind ensemble in high school. She had braces from middle school through early high school and it didn't affect her embouchure at all. She went on to play as an adult. She did get a little bit of soreness inside her lips. Putting wax over the braces ...


2

Your breath support may be the issue, as well. This article may be helpful: Of all the students in a beginning band program, the oboe players usually struggle the most. Even with a good reed and working instrument, without good embouchure and breath support, producing any sort of sound on the oboe is difficult at best. Perhaps the biggest mistake that ...


1

You're tired. Your 'lip's gone'. Don't worry, it'll be back tomorrow. Unless you got the high notes yesterday by pressing too hard and bruised the lip. Then it will take a few days. Don't over-think this.


1

Playing any instrument is a game of two halves (at least!). There's the music side and the technical side of the instrument. Having played the trumpet, the first skill is well on the way. You can probably read and know what the relationship between notes is, etc. Trumpet is usually (not always) a Bb instrument. Clarinet is usually (but not always) a Bb ...


1

I have heard from some of my band directors that the right hand on the clarinet is very similar to the right hand on the trumpet, so this may help with fingerings. Also the clarinet is a unique instrument because it only produces every other harmonic. Trumpet on the other hand produces each harmonic which is each partial. Although a beginner clarinet play ...


1

A retraining with exercises involving the "set - relax - air - jaw-pressure" type routines might be in order. https://www.somsd.k12.nj.us/site/handlers/filedownload.ashx?moduleinstanceid=4175&dataid=13286&FileName=Basic%20Bassoon%20Articulations.pdf shows a good example of training the embouchure to not need to work while as much so the jaw pressure ...


1

It's not a trivial change, but it's probably one of the easier changes. The embouchure is obviously narrower, more akin to Bb clarinet. The fingerings are related, but sax fingering is somewhat easier anyway. You'll need to practice, but it will be easier than switching to, say, euphonium. Be aware that soprano sax is a bit more specialised than alto, ...


1

You really ought to get a teacher to help you out. There are so many things you can do wrong on a brass instrument and have no idea as a beginner. In particular, it's impossible to determine whether or not your instrument has an intonation problem over the internet. Assuming your trumpet has good intonation, playing sharp comes from too much tension, ...


1

Like any instrument, the trumpet takes a lot of practice to become proficient. However, the trumpet is extremely unforgiving, often more so than a lot of other instruments. I've been playing for nearly 30 years and I still have to play every day to stay in shape. There are no shortcuts. That said, there are no secrets either. Good trumpet tone and technique ...


1

Definitely. There are lots of people who play all of the woodwinds (maybe not bassoon) very well; modern musicals almost exclusively call for this kind of doubling. In fact, it's kind of unusual to find professional saxophonists or clarinetists that aren't at least competent at the other, though admittedly those instruments are remarkably similar. And it'...


1

An exercise I've been given by my trumpet teacher that is specifically for strengthening lip muscles is to put a pencil in your mouth and attempt to hold it horizontally using only your lips. It is quite difficult at first but makes no noise, requires little equipment and can be done while doing something else.


1

When I first started playing, I had much of the same problem as you. In fact, for the first month, I played every last partial wrong and I sounded terrible. However, I started going to the lowest partial I could hit (low C). I counted up from there. I had to do this before every piece for a while to "find my place". After that, I knew by listening whether I ...


1

Being a brass player myself, I found the best way to develop my pedal tones was just to relax and get air flowing through the instrument.


1

Do Nothing!! Claude Gordon (is quoted in the article below) states that you should not be focusing on lipping any of the notes, ever, when playing pedal tones, and that you should simply focus on loose lips and steady air flow. The article in which these techniques can be elaborated on is http://thesystematicapproach.com/2010/01/18/pedal-tones-develop-...


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