34

Yes, one possible way is to clarify a "5+3" meter throughout. Depending on the music, this could be preferable to just writing 8/4 if the meter is clearly a 5+3 layout. As one example of how this could be done, consider something like: Notice that, in the second full measure, a dotted barline shows the distinction between the 5/4 and 3/4 portions of the ...


25

On single-stem pitches, the rule is always the same: the staccato goes on the side of the notehead that is opposite the stem. But when multiple voices are in play, the convention is typically to put the staccato pitch at the end of the stem, even if there's enough space to place it by the notehead. This means that, in multiple voices, the up-stem pitch will ...


23

It's great that you're thinking about where your line breaks should go, and putting them at natural "punctuation" points is generally a good idea. Breaking mid-measure though is pushing this too far. While it may fit the phrase better, it's a bit disrupting to read. Experienced musicians are very good at identifying phrases, especially when they're 4 or 8 ...


21

I've always understood that the lower pitch of the harmonic second occurs on the left side: This is also true when additional pitches are added in. On beat four, the E is now on the right because the first second encountered is D–E (and no longer E–F). When you're writing separate voices, however, you write the higher pitch first, with the lower voice ...


15

One way which is possible is to show two time signatures, as here from Tchaikovsky's second String Quartet via Popflock: This warns the user that bars of each length are to be expected. You haven't tagged the question MuseScore, but MuseScore does allow bars of varying length without having to put a time signature in every time. Right-click the bar, select ...


14

The notes in the upper staff are tuplets. As an aid towards your eventual goal, here is some sample code to create what you're looking for: \version "2.19.82" musicA = \relative c' { \key cis \minor \time 2/2 \omit TupletNumber \override TupletBracket.bracket-visibility = ##f \tuplet 3/2 4 { gis8_\markup { \italic { sempre \dynamic pp e senza ...


13

As a possible alterative to Richard's answer, you can write the total in the time signature and the division above the staff like this: This may be easier, depending on the capabilities of your notation software. However, it does imply that the divisions are the fundamental beats. In this case that is four beats to the bar, with beats 1, 2, and 4 being ...


13

Invocation make will search the current directory for a file named Makefile or makefile, so it's often simplest to name it one of these two choices and then invoke with the simple command: $ make If you use the uppercase 'M' then the file will usually be listed at the top according to alphabetical or collation order. Rules make operates by using rules ...


11

The go-to reference for notation is Elaine Gould's Behind Bars: The Definitive Guide to Music Notation. It's a massive book that, in addition to the standard tonal notation rules, includes examples of advanced post-tonal notation as well. Other resources are listed in References for typesetting music, but the Gould is certainly the industry standard. ...


11

What you're doing is doubling up on the phrase marking, which is there just for the purpose you propose. Is there any extra point in breaking up bars? Not for me. It seems an amateur thing to do, as the phrasing marks already do the job. Even without phrasing marks, most musos would be able to translate how the line of music should scan, and for me, looking ...


11

Bar lines don’t connect in vocal music. This avoids bar line-lyric collisions. I notice that both appear to be vocal pieces, but I see no lyrics on the one with connecting bar lines. As a general rule, don’t connect bar lines in vocal music; do connect them in piano music.


10

I've stumbled up on the answer to my own question. Either of the following should work: \set restNumberThreshold = #1000 % Some large number \override MultiMeasureRestNumber #'stencil = ##f The first is a bit hackish and not very robust (it sets the number of rests required to display the number extremely high), but the second may have unintended ...


9

This is common notation in keyboard music, although we don't call them "double stops"; it's just harmony. When notating something like this, you write the music out as different voices, with the caveat that up-stem and down-stem notes help clarify which voice is which. Consider the following example: the up-stem pitches are one voice and the down-stem half ...


9

As noted in Rosie F's answer, the natural is not typically required here in modern notation. But if you wanted to get it in Lilypond, I don't think there's a default accidental setting that will display these in this circumstance. Instead, you probably will need to use the Accidental.restore-first property. Something like: b(-3 g) g g \tweak Accidental....


8

Remember that full-measure rests in LilyPond are input with a capital R. Thus every instance where you have r2. (or r2.*8, etc.), you should instead have R2. (or R2.*8, etc.). Making this change in all voices corrects the problem. In the example you gave, it's present in the final lines of both the treble and bass and it's present in two lines each for the ...


8

The notes on the treble clef are triplets. That's all.


8

A first approach would be to change the text of the tuplet number and append a small slur: bow-up = \markup { \with-dimensions #'(0 . 3) #'(0 . 0) \override #'(filled . #t) \path #.1 #'((moveto 0 0) (curveto 1 1.2 2 1.2 3 0) (curveto 2 0.9 1 0.9 0 0) (closepath)) } bow-down = \markup { \with-...


8

I think this is tricky, because it's a skill between two separate skills handwriting (letters) and drawing. I have pretty bad hand writing, but I studied art in college and could draw pretty well. Drawing straight lines is actually difficult! Two things that might help: If you hunch over to get your eyes close to the paper, move back so you see more of ...


7

Composers may use a dashed/dotted/broken slur or phrase mark when it's optional (for example, when lyrics are irregular, as user25358 attests). It may also be used to indicate a hemiola, for example where a 3/4 bar should be treated as 6/8. That could be the case in bars 2-3 of your excerpt. Editors may use a dashed/dotted/broken slur to indicate editorial ...


7

Leaving out the number is an approach I have never seen in classical orchestral scores. Typically the last tutti note has a fermata, followed by a one-bar rest also having a fermata above the text "Cadenza". Of course, this leaves open, when to start again, which is the reason, why classical cadenzas end with a trill to be easily recognized. In smaller ...


7

The problem with 6/4 is that it implies a metric grouping in the bass and drums of 3+3 or 6 on its own. I notice that you are defining your tempo as q.=160 when you do this, however. That part is actually correct, and you should make your metric decision based on how you hear the tempo. The 160 bpm that you are hearing are occurring four to the bar. You can ...


7

Composers of the past few centuries have settled on a compromise: they tended to use staff paper with five-line staves already written in, like so: They then wrote in everything else with pencil: key signatures, time signatures, accidentals, pitches, etc. This way, any erasing they did preserved the staff lines. Although, in my experience with manuscript ...


7

The note with the two accidentals is an A#. The B has a natural, showing that the key sig has at least one flat. I guess it has at least 3 flats, so As are flat unless otherwise stated? There used to be a convention that if, say, the key sig makes As flat, and you want an A#, you put a natural and a sharp, as shown in your extract. (Modern practice is to ...


7

I would consider breaking measures like this, but only when: the music starts with an anacrusis (say one quarter note for the sake of this example) and there's a repeated section which requires you to go back to the beginning and repeat the anacrusis. In these circumstances you have to put the end-repeat :| bar line one quarter note before the end of an ...


6

In newer versions of LilyPond \override MultiMeasureRestNumber #'stencil = ##f can be expressed as \override MultiMeasureRestNumber.stencil = ##f or even shorter as \omit MultiMeasureRestNumber All of that does exactly the same. It's just syntactic sugar.


6

The problem is that this is not a common notation, and the meaning of the symbol "C/Em" is unclear. What Lilypond can do - as you know - is add a letter after a slash, e.g. C/E, which means that you're supposed to play a C major triad with the note E in the bass. What does exist are polychords where two different chords are stacked on top of each other. ...


6

Most of the mixed-meter scores I've seen use non-dotted measure lines as well (and no "+" sign between the paired meter notations.) . It's just treated as "we will always be switching meter every bar" . See for example West Side Story "America" where it goes into 6/8-3/4 swap time.


6

There is, thankfully! This answer assumes MuseScore 2 or higher. (It may also work on MuseScore 1, but I can't verify that.) Find the group of pitches where you want to add the optional lower octave. Select the entire group of pitches by clicking on the first pitch and Shift+Click-ing on the final pitch; the group of pitches should now be boxed in blue. ...


6

There is a convention that scores for music theater (particularly on Broadway) are always written with four bars per line. Of course that only makes sense because the music is rhythmically boring with nothing but four-bar phrases! It does boost the wages of music copyists whose union rates are per page, not per note. More empty space on the page means more ...


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