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3

A hooked bracket end indicates that the music repeats back. An open end indicates that it carries on. I'd never really thought about the hooked end for a short 'last time bar' that concludes a piece, but it makes sense, and a quick trawl through some printed song copies confirms that it's generally done. Note that the bracket gets a hook because the ...


6

Closing the last volta bracket is unnecessary and can be confusing (except, as Gould suggests, when there is a short bracket at the very end of a piece). In your arrangement, you could get away with the closed voltas in m.39 and m.73 because they are ending a section, but it's better without. The one at m.87 is wrong.


1

In most of the charts I've seen, cymbal durations using half or whole notes are written using a diamond shaped note head instead of an x shaped head. For drumset notation this can cause a little confusion, as some copyists will use the x shape for a ride cymbal and a diamond shape for a crash, but this is easily solved by writing the crash on a ledger line ...


1

The fermata you use means that the note value is actually more than its usual value/length. So some of the written parts are ambiguous. It's established that most percussion has a very short sustain value. Cymbals are obviously the odd ones out, and most people understand that their sustain is much longer. But I think most writers are more concentrated on ...


4

The U.S. Army band (see the "Percussion Clinic" download) indicates tambourine to be given with standard noteheads, which eliminates the problem described. Here is the one notation example that specifically includes a half-note: The Percussion II part for Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker also uses standard note heads for the tambourine. The below image is ...


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