13

I organise an exam centre for guitar (electric/acoustic/classical) and bass exams. Whilst 80% of candidates are younger than 18 or so, that leaves 20% adults. Most of them come with a bundle of nerves, but I see them for the next, and the next,and so on. Frequently they say "I don't know why I'm doing this", but the main real reason seems to be that they see ...


13

These brackets indicate a "first and second ending." The measures under the "1" are to be played the first time through and those under the "2" are to be played the second time. It's a nice method of notation and can be extended to more choices. There are also things like "dal segno" and "al fine" and others. You should check them out; search the internet ...


8

Triple flats and sharps do exist. They are extremely rare (never seen one in a piece myself), but theoretically you can use them. My guess is that the answer would be B triple flat or F triple sharp. Here is an example I found with a triple sharp: I found it on this website, where you can read some stuff about triple accidentals. And another example with ...


6

This is an old chestnut! 6/8 is compound time, so called because it's a sort of mixture. It can be counted in a slower two, or a faster six. ONE--TWO-- , or ONE two three FOUR five six. So, it's easy to get confused. It's more correctly called duple (double) rather than triple time, because it's made up of two dotted crotchets in each bar, but if it ...


5

As the title suggests, it's a theory exam. Lots of folk sit in a room at a desk each, and sit it together, with no reference to any musical instruments at all; rather like a GCE exam.in English or maths. It only tests your ability to envisage internally any music.Being deaf - you might as well be, for hearing yourself sing out won't be allowed! You could ...


5

It's a mistake in the book!! I just got an email back from RSL, the question is on the use of sharps/flats and double sharps/flats. 8va/vb notation was not supposed to be tested in this question and triple sharps/flats are outside of the syllabus. I've been informed that future versions of the book will now show an A rather than an Ab. Phew!


5

It isn't really that useful to think of the sightreading tests for a graded music exam in comparison to the performance pieces for graded music exams. This is because: the sightreading tests are much shorter, more like exercises than actual pieces. the sightreading tests are designed simply to test your ability to read notation and perform it at sight; ...


4

In my opinion, (this is a very opinion based question however it is a good question regardless.) It is all down to how well the musician grips an audience. Think about all of the talent shows kicking about on TV. These mass produced artist seem to me to have very little musical prowess... yet they gain a living in the music industry through fame and a record ...


4

The ABRSM theory example books are available, so there's no need to find a teacher, but, as Neil Meyer says, get one, at least for a few pointers. As a grade VIII player, you'll have a good idea of most of the theory, even if you're not aware of it, and could probably go in at grade III level initially. So in answer to the actual question, start by ...


3

I'm a music theory teacher who specialises in training students for the ABRSM exams. If you want to take the exams, then it's a good idea to begin at grade 1, even though it will be quite easy. I frequently take on students who want to take grade 5 (or higher) and have large gaps in their knowledge - things like how to beam notes correctly into groups, for ...


3

Is it perhaps a mistake in the clef? If that was a treble clef then you would be looking at an F flat which does have two enharmonic equivalents


3

On the assumption it's not written in treble or bass clef, but C clef instead, and you guessed it was treble, the Ab note would actually be a Bb. This then is enharmonically the same as A#, and also Cbb. That obviates the need for any (dubious in my opinion) bbb or #x. Otherwise, the only notes with 3 enharmonic names are Ax/B/Cb; B#/C/Dbb; Dx/E/Fb; E#/F/...


3

I don't have experience with RGT. But I have taken both ABRSM and Trinity exams. Although ABRSM do require a Grade 5 pass before continuing any practical Grade 6-8, Trinity do have extra exercises required for the grade that ABRSM don't have. Therefore I would say they are around about the same in terms of difficulty up through the grades. ABRSM exams ...


3

With the regime of ABRSM, it's necessary to pass grade V theory before taking VI, VII and VIII practical, on any instrument, but the other way round isn't a problem. You can take whatever you like, theory-wise. Not all exam boards have this stipulation in place. However, like with so many other theoretical things, it would tend to make more sense if there ...


2

I've heard of the ABRSM and I know that their grades are equivalent to the US schools and Canadian schools. I live in Toronto, Canada, so we have the RCM (Royal Conversatory of Music). I will explain what the requirements are for the RCM and then you can compare and contrast that with your system. The following overview is from the perspective of the piano ...


2

Have a listen, and a look at Fly Me to the Moon. Written in 3/4, but far more commonly played and sung in 4/4. See how the notes are lengthened in each bar to accomodate the extra beat. Notice that the same word/note stays on beat 1, whichever time sig. is used.The same works in reverse from 4/4 into 3/4, with appropriate shortening of other notes in each ...


2

It is certainly possible to teach yourself using the ABRSM books. For up to grade 5, there's the pink book "The ABRSM Guide to Music Theory", which has all the stuff you need to learn, but in completely the wrong order. There's the little orange "First Steps in Music Theory", which is in the right order, but is a quick summary with little explanation. Put ...


2

"All items may be sung by any voice and in any key, published or transposed, suited to the compass of the candidate’s voice, except for those items from operas, operettas, oratorios, cantatas and sacred works in Grades 6–8 (Lists A and D) where a particular voice and key are specified (although original pitch may be adopted in Baroque pieces, if ...


2

Was your teacher playing from an ABRSM publication of sample tests? I doubt they'd throw you a curve ball in a Grade 2 exam! But if they do, and you clap 'fast 6' to a tune in 6/8, I'm sure the examiner would be kind. You might be excused for confusing one bar of 6/8 with two of 3/4. But be clear that 6/8 is described as 'compound duple', 2 beats to ...


2

I have done three methods of music exams. UNISA, ABRSM and TRINITY GUILDHALL. The ABRSM usually has a host school (regular High School I mean) in your area that hosts the exams. There are three sessions a year that you can sign up for. The exams usually have two rooms one for the initial to grade 3 and one room for the grade fours and ups. You are ...


1

Note values of semibreve, minim, crotchet, quaver and semiquaver, and their equivalent rests (candidates may use the terms ‘whole note’, ‘half note’, etc.). Tied notes. Single-dotted notes and rests. 2 Simple time signatures of 24 34 4 , bar-lines and the grouping of the notes listed above within these times. 3 The stave. Treble (G) and bass (F) clefs. Names ...


1

I took my Grade 6 and grade 8 exams with the Canadian RCM, which is very similar to the ABRSM. I wanted to skip grade 7 entirely, but my teacher strongly advised me to continue with grade 7 and simply not take the exam. This was very much the right call — the difficultly level between 6 and 8 was significant, and I was not capable of playing many of ...


1

The grades are cumulative, not task-orientated. That is to say, if you skip out Grade 3, you won't have missed anything that's ONLY in Grade 3. It's not like skipping a chapter in a textbook. So, if you're good enough to move straight to Grade 4, no problem.


1

Should be no problem whatsoever to skip a grade or two. If your piano teacher thinks you are ready for Grade 4, then go for it! (It was rather a long time ago, but I only ever did 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and arguably 8 is the only one that matters; the others just help you pace yourself.)


1

The styles are the antithesis of each other. Obviously, for the Rockschool method, you would focus completely on modern styles of music where ABRSM, for instance, would be completely focussed on classical repertoire. Generally speaking for the rock stuff you will sing with a backtrack where with the classical stuff you would have piano accompaniment. ...


1

I'm adding a new answer on account of the updated original question. Here are the only possibilities I can think of: The initial G-sharp is obvious, and it's exactly what you already have. The remaining two G-sharps indicate the exact same pitch, just one with an 8vb (one octave below) marking, the other with a 15mb (two octaves below). If you've covered ...


1

It will depend a lot on what you intend to do with (or without) it. There have been discussions on this site as to the usefulness of the 'piece of paper'. Some intimated that grade viii was only a starting point as far as being a pro player is concerned - probably from a classical standpoint. It also depends where you are in your playing standard, too. ...


1

I've just turned 60. I did piano, clarinet and music theory exams ten years ago. I've started playing the trumpet and loving learning a new instrument. For one thing the trumpet is much more reliable that the clarinet which I use for busking. I like doing exams and I'm planning on doing the grade 1 trumpet exam later this year. As far as I know there are no ...


1

After ten years with the guitar you'll have become quite comfortable with the instrument, and will have developed some musicianship. Naturally it's humbling to take up another instrument and find your fingers tripping over pieces of music that you could probably pick out on guitar while standing on your head. Feel humbled, but don't feel foolish. Relish ...


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