Hot answers tagged

7

For ABRSM, the syllabus lays out these rules quite clearly. Minor scales in the lower grades may be played harmonic or melodic or natural minor by the candidate's choice (do check carefully as you take higher grades when this changes!) Pieces are normally played without repeats. The syllabus will say if a given piece on it should be played with repeats, so ...


7

The AP Music theory test consists of a lot of different concepts including : being able to read all clefs (including alto, tenor, etc.) knowledge of musical terminology (there is a lot covered on the test) knowledge of keys, scales and modes knowledge of basics about the instruments like what they sound like basic chord construction basic voice leading ...


4

In my opinion, (this is a very opinion based question however it is a good question regardless.) It is all down to how well the musician grips an audience. Think about all of the talent shows kicking about on TV. These mass produced artist seem to me to have very little musical prowess... yet they gain a living in the music industry through fame and a record ...


3

I think this is a question that only you can answer. We can help guide you, but ultimately the decision will be yours. Ask yourself: Am I comfortable carrying all of the necessary sheet music with me whenever I want to play? If I'm ever on vacation and run into a piano, am I happy with only playing if I've brought my music along with me? If I ever give a ...


3

With the regime of ABRSM, it's necessary to pass grade V theory before taking VI, VII and VIII practical, on any instrument, but the other way round isn't a problem. You can take whatever you like, theory-wise. Not all exam boards have this stipulation in place. However, like with so many other theoretical things, it would tend to make more sense if there ...


2

One of my teachers talked about memorization as follows. There are different kinds of memorization, and once you've merged them all, you're set. 1) "See" ,in your mind, the score as you play. 2) Play the whole tune from pure muscle memory 3) Play the whole tune from knowing the notes (rather than "seeing" the written notes) Then there's the other 3-step ...


2

You have to be either (1) highly motivated or (2) have somebody really pushing you (parent, spouse, teacher, etc.) to get to grades 7 and 8. After more than 60 years playing and 50 years teaching, my "comfort level" is still about grade four or so and I have to really push myself to play grade 6 pieces. But then I don't consider myself primarily a ...


2

At dip. level, you and your teacher should be addressing this. It's a personal thing, and while one may say practise all four simultaneously, another may say do one for a week/fortnight, then another, and so on. We all work differently, so it's impossible to give good advice that'll work for you. With the exam maybe 12 months away, I'd be learning a big ...


2

That is tough. I am not sure if advice from a guitarist will carry over to piano but... I try to maintain a diverse repertoire on two instruments. The approach depends on whether you are learning these pieces from scratch and working them up to performance level or just ironing out glitches but already know them. And, how much time you have to get them ...


1

Grades are often skipped, both practical and theory. In ABRSM, not sure about AMEB, grade V theory must be passed to be able to enter grade VI and above practical. The theory syllabus is usually cumulative - it keeps adding to the previous stuff - so just looking at, say, grade V, will not give you enough information to pass. You'll need to be aware of all ...


1

I tackled the symphonic extract question by buying as many past papers as I could lay my hands on and working through them. Along the way, I made a list of all the subjects that the questions included (terms, transposition, history, form analysis etc.) and then spent time learning as much as I could on each of those subjects. It takes a lot of time, but it's ...


1

The two main drum examination services are Rockschool and Trinity Colledge. These both have international examinations availible. For more information see the following websites: Trinity Colledge Internationl Rockschool India


1

It is not universal, or even usual to memorise exam pieces. Whether you're going to take the exam or not! I don't understand what you mean by "As well as chord progressions, I am keen to use my left hand more".


1

I do what I like to call the avalanche approach. It is when for instance if a piece is 8 bars, you start at bar one. You make sure you have bar one under your belt, then you go to bar two, then you play the first two bars together, refreshing your memory on the first bar while you learn the second You keep on doing this until you get all the music under ...


1

When I need to memorize some music, I just practice without looking into the scores. If you don't remember the next phrase - look it up and start again. You can also try to remember it by parts (e.g. memorize the first part, then the second, then try to play them both). As of your question - I've never heard of people memorizing music by dictating it. It ...


1

Grade 6 ABRSM is a fair bit more work than Grade 5. Grade 5 theory is sufficient to gain you access to a practical level of Grade 8, that is more than enough for most people who do not want to do music for a career. Grade 6 is only required when you start work on the music diplomas that ABRSM offers. Grade 6 is for the DipABRSM and Grade 8 is for the LRSM. ...


1

Sounds about right. The ABRSM 'Theory in Practice' books are well thought of, and will take you past 5, into 6 easily. Work through them, with an occasional teacher input. Most people seem to do grade 5 as a passport to practical 6+, and don't do 6,7 and 8. Assuming you want to pursue a musical career, it will look good on the c.v. and also fill in a lot of ...


1

You are allowed to take theory exams regardless of whether you are learning an instrument. The reason it is in place the other way around is to ensure that people doing grades 6 or higher on an instrument know music theory to at least grade 5 standard.


1

This page on ABRSM's website should give you everything you need to know. There, you'll see a table that shows you when to expect results based off of when she took the exam: Underneath the table is a link on how to view your results when they do come in.


1

I took my Grade 6 and grade 8 exams with the Canadian RCM, which is very similar to the ABRSM. I wanted to skip grade 7 entirely, but my teacher strongly advised me to continue with grade 7 and simply not take the exam. This was very much the right call — the difficultly level between 6 and 8 was significant, and I was not capable of playing many of ...


1

The grades are cumulative, not task-orientated. That is to say, if you skip out Grade 3, you won't have missed anything that's ONLY in Grade 3. It's not like skipping a chapter in a textbook. So, if you're good enough to move straight to Grade 4, no problem.


1

Should be no problem whatsoever to skip a grade or two. If your piano teacher thinks you are ready for Grade 4, then go for it! (It was rather a long time ago, but I only ever did 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and arguably 8 is the only one that matters; the others just help you pace yourself.)


1

Adding to L3B's answer, the more talented one is, the sooner it's all achieved. Obviously practice time, quality of teacher, finances, also feature strongly. As a guideline, I said one exam per year, depending on results, of course was fair, but it's only a vague guideline. Everyone has different amounts of talent, time, motivation, etc., etc. So, if it's a ...


1

Another factor to consider is the instrument. If it's piano, and you haven't played that particular one, you need something to get the feel of it before playing more demanding pieces. You may even consider your accompanist if they have to play a piano. If it's electric guitar, and you're using someone else's amp, simple is a good start, then you may be able ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible