16

I'll answer the "When should I" of your question simply, and from the experience of someone with a music ed degree, but no formal voice training. I do know the basics of vocal training and education, and have had a little myself. I won't delve into the different physiological differences with the falsetto voice, since that's been awhile… :) For most male ...


7

As much as it bothers you, he's actually naturally doing exactly what he should be doing. I'll explain in a moment. Changing voices for boys who sing is primarily difficult for two reasons: the physiological aspect and the psychological aspect. Because many books are written on this subject, I will very briefly address each citing information from a text ...


5

If you are singing in falsetto, you will notice that you won't need to exhale as forcefully to sing high notes. You should also sense a relaxation in the muscles that control your vocal chords. You will also be able to sing high notes much more quietly when singing in falsetto. There is a distinct and recognizable physiological shift in the mechanics of the ...


4

Sure. I think the majority of countertenors employ falsetto for considerable parts of their range. Check out Ombra mai fu in the version of Jochen Kowalski, a countertenor mainly employing falsetto. That's certainly a valid/serious singing style. His hallmark role indeed is "Prinz Orlofsky" from the operette "Die Fledermaus" which is a comical role, and ...


3

This is a very confused question. Your description of falsetto is mostly wrong, partly by mixing up cause, effect, and side effects. Falsetto comes about by a particular configuration of the larynx that does make it harder to achieve good closure in lower ranges. The fundamental pitch control mechanisms in falsetto and chest-based voices are considerably ...


3

Head voice is a transitional voice using both chest voice and falsetto mechanisms. It's usually employed in the character of a lightened chest voice so it still has the "male tinge" to it. It's probably the main upper register tool for the lyric tenor in contrast to the dramatic tenor which uses a stronger bout of chest voice. "Reinforced falsetto" is a ...


3

Another answer states "after the hormonal development in his body changes his voice range into the lifelong adult range": that's dangerously misleading. The male (and to quite a lesser degree the female) voice change is a significant change of the whole larynx. As a sort of imagery, consider it like a molting insect that's soft initially and hardens out ...


3

I haven't had a chance to watch the second video yet, but in the first, it sounds to me like maybe a mixture of falsetto and non-falsetto (modal) voice. A full-on falsetto usually has a more "Mickey Mouse" quality to it. I think this also might have a more nasal resonance to it. Granted, I don't know much about technical vocal terminology. But you mention ...


2

To me both sound like falsetto used to great effect in combination with microphone technique. In the lower range, both use a breathy kind of falsetto with incomplete closure (which is what most people occasionally using falsetto end up with). That's good for a "husky female" variant. In their higher range, they use reinforced falsetto (with good closure, ...


2

You'll probably find you don't have a single threshold between falsetto and chest/head voices, but instead these ranges overlap. Many singers work on extending the range of their head voice upwards to have a more full-bodied sound in a higher register. Low-pitched falsetto is a bit of an oxymoron, I'm not entirely sure what you hope to achieve, but you'll ...


2

Here's my striped back timeline for learning to "mix" my voice. I didn't practice loads at home, maybe 1 hour a week on top of 30 minute lesson) 1st Teacher: 1 Year - Trills, diction/vowels, Using diaphragm correctly, control of volume and breathing. 2nd Teacher: 6 Month - Frys, mixing voice 1 Year - Perfecting the above, to understood and control it ...


2

All human beings in general are able to sing higher notes using falsetto than head voice. In fact the term falsetto is Italian for false and the term is used to describe the ability to shift into "false" voice to achieve higher notes than you are otherwise capable. Although scientist believe that not all people produce falsetto the same way. In order to ...


2

The range for male falsetto tends to be that of alto. A few soloists might dip into mezzosoprano ranges, but alto is quite more common. One reason is that for a usable falsetto range, you are better off with a deeper chest voice and that limits the higher range. If you want your singer to stay solidly in falsetto, you'll still want to avoid low alto range ...


2

B4 in the modal voice is an incredibly difficult note to reach! Who are you listening to that goes higher than that? The big note in Nessun Dorma is a B4 for Christ's sake! I consider myself very lucky to have the vocal range I have, I've got a decent tenor range that covers me for everything I want to sing. And despite that, there's no way I'm hitting a ...


2

I'm no expert, but that sounds like a perfectly normal tenor range to me. What singers are you listening to? You could try transposing to another key, or singing in the same key but down an octave, or adjusting the melody line to avoid the high notes. Do whatever sounds good and doesn't hurt. There are plenty of great singers with ranges more limited ...


2

I'd recommend you see an ENT. It is possible you could have vocal damage (although not super likely, so don't panic just yet). It is also possible you just forgot the coordination for falsetto, as you say you didn't sing (well, couldn't) for three months. Does any sound come out at all when trying to bridge your passagio? You can try imitating Minnie Mouse ...


2

Both the Bee Gees & Green Gartside from Scritti Politti made their careers out of being able to sing falsetto at lower ranges than most people would naturally use. They, of course, knew they were doing it. Singing "quieter" is one way that towards the top end of your range to switch into falsetto, accidentally or on purpose. As you sing up louder, you ...


1

I gave a listen to the song. George Johnson is not singing falsetto during the verse, not until the final ringing note of the line immediately preceding the chorus. Thats the natural upper range of his voice. During the chorus, and you are right here, there are at least a half-dozen voices singing, and most of them are singing falsetto. I can clearly hear ...


1

You need to find your range, and be comfortable with it. Tenor tesituras are less common, actually, and are very desirable. Also, careful practice/warmup can allow you to "stretch" your range, but make sure you aren't straining because that could cause damage to your voice.


1

This does not sound like "warmup" but rather like pre-stress. The purpose of warmup generally is to align your reflexes to the realities of today's state of voice and atmosphere and give an additional loosening up. However, the durations you are talking about here would seem excessive for that. It rather sounds like your "warmup" is for getting your vocal ...


1

I am a professional Baritone and unfortunately get colds all the time. You must ensure that you do not strain your voice - if you can't get a note, stop trying and try the next day. To ease your full range back, there are a couple of things you could do: 1) Try vocal exercises like starting on a C, and singing 1-5, 5-1, 1-9, 9-1, and gradually moving up by ...


1

People singing along to a tune when listening through headphones rarely comes out well. The problem is that the headphones mean the singer can't hear themselves - all they can hear is the music, and a muffled rumbling of their own voice through the bone structure in the head. Not much through the actual ear, so no tone to recognise as a note. This is true of ...


1

This may be a duplicate, in fact there are quite a few posts on this site about trying to sing head voice/falsetto. Consider seeing the other post and the good tips that are there. From personal experience, I will say that the best learning mechanism for this is time. The other post gives technical descriptions of the voice mechanisms and explains that the ...


1

You can't sing along sensibly with headphones, falsetto or not. Not even studio musicians do that: the monitor mix in their headphones contains their own voice. At best you blend your bone conductance into a total sound that isn't there to the listener. Just record him a few times to demonstrate and ask him to stop it, or go away yourself. I doubt that ...


1

If he is doing this while wearing headphones, he presumably cannot hear exactly what it sounds like to others. I would suggest recording the sounds he is making and then playing them back to him. I suspect that when he hears exactly what he sounds like to others, he might start to change his "output" - without the need to think about paying for extra lessons....


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